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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (Jan.-June 1896)"

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o. F. Nsws Letter 




THE HELMET, " KING'S ' RIVER ,CANY0N. FROM THE PAINTING BY G. fD. ROBINSON. 



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Vol. 111. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 1896. 



Number 1. 



Printed and Publish* d every Saturday by the proprietor, FliEH MA HItlOT'T, 
006-609-818 Merchant street, San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco 
Postoffice as Second-class Matter. 

'The office of the IfMWS LETTER in Ifew York City is at the ■■ World " 
Building, Room 187 {J3, Kali, Eastern Representative), where informa- 
tion ""/// in obtained regarding subscription ">/</ advertising rates. 

APROPOS the recent effort to bring the Republican 
National Convention to San Francisco it is suggested 
that such movements give some individuals an opportunity 
to purchase a little cheap notoriety and lay it up as a 
claim upon the gratitude of the party. There are few 
men who have ever been delegates that do not publish the 
fact when ever they walk out among their fellows. After 
all, delegations and conventions are but the showy autumn 
leaves upon the tree of politics to be blown away by the 
first gust of a windy campaign. 

THE Examiner pretends to be astonished because a rich 
young man prefers horse racing to politics as a side 
occupation. Why not? Let a rich young man go into 
politics, and besides being obliged to keep company that 
he would turn away from in a poolroom, he will have the 
press giving its energies to libeling him. And the Exam- 
iner would not consent to be left in the race. With rich 
old men it is different. They are forgiven a fondness for 
Senatorial togas as readily as young women are a weak- 
ness for sealskins. And nobody is very curious about the 
means either take to get them. 

THERE is a wretched and unfortunate creature creep- 
ing along our streets selling lead pencils. Both legs 
are gone from the knees down and he presents a pitiable 
appearance. He has travelled here from the East, so the 
daily papers say. San Francisco seems to be the jumping off 
place for the maimed, the halt and the blind. It's a shame 
to have such objects of misery on the public pavements. 
The city is in duty bound to place persons of such misfor- 
tune in the Alms House at once. Several years ago, we 
had a visit from six cripples on wheels; they had found 
their way wretchedly, and probably departed in as un- 
happy a condition. 

THE brethren who wear the cowl are holy, of course, 
but still they are human. And being human it is not 
to be expected of them that they will not need to pray for 
grace to restrain a tendency to exult, even as if they were 
of the worldly, over the peculiar afflictions that have been 
visited upon their enemies. Here is Price, the publisher 
of the A. P. A. Magazine, arrested for disseminating ob- 
scene literature-, and the Rev. Dr. Brown, mighty in dis- 
course at A. P. A. meetings, accused by a conscienceless 
old woman of having surrendered to the charms of a young 
one. The Lord, for the moment, seems to be against the 
A. I 1 

STRANGE that it does not occur to Dr. Dille that he 
was tided in upon a New York City wave of reform; 
that he tops that wave on account of his lack of weight 
rather than his ability to swim. He is of the drift wood, 
and not a big log either. He would do for lirewood, but 
there is not the possibility of a plank in the whole timber 
of him, knots included. Recently he told an intelligent 
audience about a man using a wart on his neck for a collar 
button ! The doctor of whatever he gives medicine to 
was not even talking upon the subject of economy. He is 
neither eloquent, learned, nor a man of excellent taste. 
When such a one becomes an apparent leader, of what 
stuff must his following be ? And yet this same plaything 
of circumstances over which, of course, he has no control, 
will probably never realize what a great man he was not. 



THE brethren of the pulpit have been interviewed as to 
their views on evolution. The concensus of clerical 
opinion is that they hope the theory of development is not 
correct, in which case it is contrary to Scripture. But if 
correct, and not to be disputed, then a true interpretation 
of Scripture will show that the inspired writers antici- 
pated Darwin, and that evolution is in entire harmony with 
Scripture. Faith overcometh all things. 



DID President Harrison really agree to turn over the 
federal patronage of New York, and did he actually 
make a bargain with Senator Piatt to that effect? — that 
is what the Nation, in New York, asks. Mr. Sherman has 
made a direct charge that the Indiana Candidate for a 
second nomination put a certain contract in Steve Elkin's 
pocket. The Boston Herald, one of the most powerful 
journals in the country, has made an angry demand, 
upon Mr. Harrison to say why! 



IT seems evident to all the rational citizens of California 
that Governor Budd was "level-headed" when he made 
the reorganization in the State Militia, in consolidating the 
nine regiments scattered about the State into five. AU 
sorts of influence was brought to bear by influential citi- 
zens to swerve the Governor from his determination. 
But, as Hoke Smith would say: "He seen his duty and he 
done it!" In short, Mr. Budd has backbone, and deserves 
great credit. It relieved some too hundred officers of their 
former rank, and "hence the tears." But there is no dis- 
puting that while these gentlemen were mustered out, it 
was a wise and politic undertaking on the part of the Gov- 
ernor to simplify our National Guard and render it soldier- 
like and efficient. 



THE guardian angel of San Francisco's Alms House has 
been, for the past twelve years, the matron, Mrs. 
Weaver, wife of the present Superintendent. This lady 
has made a thorough study of human nature as it comes 
under her constant inspection. While all are treated with 
careful impartiality, there are inmates who have been 
used to luxuries in their youthful prosperity, of which 
the cruelty of old age and misfortune has now deprived 
them. These persons have received from the matron that 
same delicate consideration which has marked her hearty 
and cheery devotion to any and every one else. In con- 
sequence, she is adored by all there. Now, a question of 
politics has arisen in the Board of Supervisors, and an in- 
tention has been "declared" to dismiss Superintendent 
and Mrs. Weaver. This would be a sad disgrace to the 
City and County. 



IT seems to be a difficult matter for boards of health and 
other such bodies to keep within the bounds of their 
powers. In undertaking to stop the sale of skim-milk in 
this city, the health authorities have certainly exceeded 
their jurisdiction. It is clearly not a lawful exercise of 
the police power to attempt the suppression of traffic in 
a wholesome article of food, merely because it may be 
palmed off upon the unsuspecting as* something richer or 
better. It would be entirely proper, however, to require 
all skimmed milk to be sold as such, and to this end to 
provide reasonable regulations against imposition on the 
public. In using all proper means to prevent adulteration 
or fraudulent substitution, the Board of Health will have 
the support of the public. But there is a reasonable limit 
to its functions and powers. When the Board steps be- 
yond that limit, it arbitrarily interferes with legitimate 
business, and becomes a meddling nuisance. 



January 4. 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



A CLERGYMAN IN TRIBULATION. 

TH ! this town arc • 

1 burcb. 

a< B 

tor of l >o i 1 1 <^ In 

I within bis gates, ami tin- damsel 

with him. The old woman demanded hush money— not for 

.'. but for a mysterious third person who has not been 

found, a Mrs. Barns and the Doctor was weak 

count. Be was. however, 

sufficiently endowed with the wisdom of the serpent to take 

••int. and after consulting with his deacons, 

to call in the police. As ;> consequence Mrs. Mary A. 

Davidson, who got the $500, is in jail. 

Had Dr. Brown been a man of the world he never would 
have given up that money, but rung for a policeman im- 
mediately, innocent or guilty. But a clergyman is pecu- 
liarly placed. Notwithstanding the assertion of the Rev. 
Sydney Smith, that there are three sexes — men, women, 
and parsons — preachers arc male, and they occupy a 
unique position. In modern times chastity is demanded 
of them. For one of them to lose his reputation for that 
lisastrous to him as if he were a woman. One of the 
conditions on which his salary is paid him is that he shall 
be chaste. If a Protestant he is given a wife, if a Cath- 
olic he goes without one, but in either case he is expected 
to walk before the world a model of virtuous conduct. A 
man in common, secular life would not like, of course, to be 
accused of the offense imputed to the Rev. Dr. Brown, but 
if of ordinary courage he would let the public think what 
it liked, reassure his wife, send the girl home to her par- 
ents, and leave the rest to the courts. But his pluck in 
such circumstances would be as nothing compared with 
that displayed by the Rev. Dr. Brown. It is no great ex- 
aggeration to say that it is a matter of life and death to 
him. To have a Christian character to maintain is no light 
burden. 

As for Mrs. Davidson, she is in jail, and in all likelihood will 
go to the penitentiary, unless Dr. Brown should choose to 
take counsel of his Master and be merciful beyond the mercy 
of those of this world. There is not one chance in a hundred 
that her story is true. But while there is that one chance 
justice requires that everything should be done to enable 
the old woman to make a defense. She is poor and friend- 
less, and appearances are all against her. Make a violent 
effort of the imagination, defy probability, and suppose she 
is telling the truth. Then fancy her case. She has the 
public against her, the press against her, and the congre- 
gation of the Rev. Dr. Brown's church has rallied around 
him with that enthusiastic loyalty characteristic of con- 
gregations. She seems to know the peril of her plight, for 
she expects to go to San Quentiu. There are generous 
souls in the world. It may be that one of them, with a 
purse, will rise up and, without passing judgment on Dr. 
Brown, resolve that this old woman shall be given every 
opportunity to substantiate her statements if she can, 
that popular clamor shall not deprive her of her legal 
right to be considered innocent until her guilt has been 
proved. The old woman is entitled to a fair show, and she 
can't have it unless a good Samaritan with money appears. 

Dr. Brown has done well to appeal to the police; that is 
greatly in his favor. But he will do bettor if he shall ex- 
press Miss Overman to her parents and give a clearer 
explana iion of why he allowed himself to be blackmailed 
out of $500 on a foul and false charge. 

There Will There will be no war between the United 
Be States and England over the Venezuela 

No War. boundary. Every man of sense who con- 
sults his judgment, rather than his passions, 
believes that. The people of the two nations are civilized, 
not savages, and they will not fight, therefore, for the 
mere sake of fighting. War between two such countries, 
devoted as they are to the arts of peace, is too horrible to 
be contemplated by any one who knows what war is, who 
values human life and human happiness, and cherishes the 
smallest regard for the world's welfare. 

The quarrel which has sprung up will, in the end, be 
beneficial in a good many ways. For one thing, it will cure 
English statesmen of a pernicious inclination to deal 
with the United States from the British newspaper 



point of view. 1 blame for President 

i rent message, it Is the misfor- 

e to have been a journalist, a 

writer of articles for the Saturday Review, which is as 

flippant as it is bright and Utter. When his lordship gets 

his pen in his hand bis old newspaper habit returns, and be 

is more eager to make a point or tun m than be is 

to round an innocuous diplomatic phrase. His response to 
Secretary Olney, which brought forth tin- President's 
vehement message, was worse than ill-considered. It was 

insulting. Bad Secretary of si air ( tlney been a rural con- 
temporary ami Lord Salisbury been seated in the edit 
chair of the Saturday Review, rebuking and instructing 

him. he could not have been more offensive in tone more 
condescending in his manner of giving tbe American Secre- 
tary of Stale elementary instruction as to the meaning and 
scope of the American Monroe Doctrine. It was indefensible 
in a Prime Minister of England, if quite allowable in an 
editorial writer for a sneering London weekly, catering to 
its clientele. 

When the fever of resentment on both sides of the water 
dies down, Lord Salisbury's share in the unhappy business 
will be given more attention. It may or may not be Eng- 
land's present desire that the United States shall arbi- 
trate her boundary dispute with Venezuela, but it cer- 
tainly is not the desire of England's people that her mon- 
arch for the time being — her Prime Minister — should be a 
man of Lord Salisbury's caliber — a man who, for the sake 
of saying smart things, affronts a first-class power and 
brings war very near. 

There is too much common sense in both England and 
America to permit the concerns of an insignificant South 
American republic to embroil them in an armed conflict. 
Lord Salisbury may think it beneath the dignity of a Sat- 
urday Reviewer to arbitrate anything, but the British 
people may be trusted to have a truer perception of what 
constitutes dignity. They do not want anything which 
does not of right belong to them, and we think they have con- 
fidence in the fairness of the government of the United States 
— confidence enough to be sure that this government would 
not take a way an inch of territory belonging to G reat Britain 
or give to Venezuela an inch to which she has no title in 
justice. There is in England, we are persuaded, no deep- 
seated sentiment against arbitration of this question, 
whatever Lord Salisbury's proud spirit may lead him to 
declare. That gentleman's next note to our Government, 
we venture to prophesy, will be graver and more respect- 
ful in tone than was his impudent Saturday Review editor- 
ial to Secretary Olney on the Monroe Doctrine. Should it 
be otherwise — should the Saturday Reviewer's instincts 
overcome the prudence of the Prime Minister — the English 
people and the English Parliament will have something to 
say. Let the alternative be presented of a war with the 
United States or a change of ministry, and there will be 
a change of ministry. Lord Salisbury will be a statesman 
out of a job. 

It is to be remembered that the people of England know 
nothing about the Monroe Doctrine. They are not aware 
of how much it means to us, and how earnest we are when 
it is called in question. When they come to understand 
the situation, as they surely will, a British roar will go up 
— a roar against war and for arbitration. Lord Salis- 
bury's feelings will cut no figure whatever. 

The beauties of the labor-union was recently shown 
when the manager of the Baldwin found fault with the 
way the cooking was done. The chef got mad and left. 
His five assistants dropped their aprons and followed suit. 
They had to. They expected to see the guests leave the 
hotel and the manager go into bankruptcy. Instead of that 
he hired another chef and five more assistants and now 
nobody finds fault with the cooking. The chef had been 
getting $200 a month for several years, and now owns 
houses and lands, but, for a wonder, the Baldwin is not in- 
cluded. The assistants are poor and out of work. Some 
day a gleam of common sense will enter the brains of la- 
borers, and then all will not allow themselves to be drag- 
ged down by the stupidity, or quarrel, or misfortune of 
one man. When there are no more poor, nor unfortunate, 
nor unemployed, the strikers may be on top, but never till 
then. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 



Protection A Society for the Protection of Preachers 
for the appears to be in order. Seeing that black- 
Preachers, mailers and other designing persons are con- 
stantly layiDg snares and setting traps for 
the guileless and unsuspecting clergymen, it behooves the 
more experienced male and female members of church 
congregations to organize for the circumvention of these 
agents of the devil. The crafts and subtleties of un- 
scrupulous women, particularly widows, are especially to 
be guarded against, and the society should see to it that 
the advice of the elder Weller to his son is inscribed upon 
the walls of every minister's study. But no trust is to be 
placed in precepts; of themselves alone they are in- . 
sufficient to baffle the arts of the corrupt. Yet rules and 
regulations are needed for the conduct of priests and 
deacons in order that they may be hedged about on every 
side with safeguards. Particularly must pastoral calls be 
subjected to the most rigid discipline. Pastoral visitation 
is one of the readiest means of ensnaring the artless 
divine. The preacher should never be allowed to go unat- 
tended upon errands of consolation to the homes of 
spiritual sisters whose physical well-being may be reported 
as more or less impaired. It is not sufficient that the 
apostle shall be pure; he must be shielded from con- 
tact with evil; from the net of the adventuress and the 
pitfall of the blackmailer. To err is human, and society 
is prone to suspicion. Since the introduction of "steering 
committees" for the safety of legislators exposed to temp- 
tation from lobbyists, many Western statesmen have been 
preserved to their constituents in all the bloom of inno- 
cence and unsullied patriotism. Without such guardian- 
ship these law-makers might have fallen by the wayside, 
and become wholly lost in political sin. If these thing be 
just and seemly for statesmen, how much greater is the 
need of protection for the pastors. There is more joy in 
hell and the newspaper offices over a scandal affecting a 
prominent preacher than rejoicing on earth for the salva- 
tion of a thousand souls. The multitude of the ungodly 
and the profane openly chuckle when the foul shafts of 
slander are sent flying against the reputation of some one 
of the Lord's annointed. The way to confound the plot- 
ters of iniquity, to heap confusion upon the slanderers, is 
to so order the goings and the comings of the ministers 
and stewards that an alibi may always be established, 
to break down any specific charge of wrong-doing. Let 
the Society for the Protection of Preachers so contrive 
its good offices that no clergyman shall ever be alone and 
helpless, lest some emissary of Satan take him unawares. 
Let every minister be required to keep a diary in which 
from day to day and from hour to hour his walks and talks 
shall be set down, and let it always appear that he was 
attended by some member of the S. P T. P. O. P. So 
shall the wicked be confounded, and the pencil of the inter- 
viewer be brought to naught. 



The Winter Season Few of the multitude of Eastern 
In people who are accustomed to spend 

San Francisco. the winter months in Southern Cali- 
fornia have a correct idea of the 
mildness of the winter season in San Francisco. If the 
facts were better known, this city would enjoy no small 
share of the benefits of the tourist travel that is 
now confined almost exclusively to the southern part of 
the State. When Eastern people read of the frosts that 
have of late, threatened with serious injury the orange 
crop of the southern counties; of bitter winds sweeping 
down from icy mountains upon the citrus groves; of 
temperatures as low as four or six degrees below the 
freezing point at such places as San Bernardino and 
Riverside, they would be surprised to learn that as far 
north as San Francisco there had been no freezing cold; 
that the most delicate flowers have been blooming in our 
open-air gardens throughout November and December. 
At this time pansies, roses, violets, heliotrope, geraniums 
and many other flowers may be seen blooming out of doors 
in this city. And the bright weather of the holiday sea- 
son here has certainly not been surpassed in any part of 
Southern California. Yet our hotels are almost bare of 
Eastern patrons, and travel sets steadily, as usual, from 
the East towards Los Angeles. Some organized efforts 
should be directed, in behalf of this city, towards the wide- 



spread advertising in the East of the many advantages 
and attractions that San Francisco and the surrounding 
country possess for the winter tourist. Certainly, no town 
or city in the southern part of the State can compare for 
a moment with San Francisco in resources for amusement 
and recreation. Los Angeles is, in fact, dull and tame, 
contrasted with this metropolis of the Coast. Nor can any 
spot in all Southern California vie with this in the magni- 
ficence and beauty of its natural surroundings. From this 
point, too, a great number of short excursions may be had 
to places of interest, such as Monterey, Santa Cruz, San 
Jose, Napa, Santa Rosa, Sausalito, San Rafael, and a host 
of others that might be named. For those who enjoy hunt- 
ing or fishing there is abundance of sport to be found within 
a day's journey. For riding or driving, coaching, or bicy 
cle excursions, many hundreds of miles of excellent roads are 
accessible from San Francisco, while in the southern counties 
good roads are almost unknown. There is, perhaps, a little 
more sunshine south of the Tehachapi than ordinarily 
falls to our lot here during the winter months, but 
in this city there is certainly less frost than is commonly 
experienced either at Los Angeles or Riverside. In short, 
the winter climate of Sau Francisco is a thing to be proud 
of, and its merits should be heralded far and wide. This is 
not a matter of boasting, but of business. A large volume 
of winter tourist travel to this city would mean the ex- 
penditure here of hundreds of thousands of dollars, in our 
hotels, restaurants, and other establishments, all of which 
would add to the general prosperity. 

The Position In spite of the fact that the pulpits of 
of our larger churches are occupied by men of 

the Ministry, the best education and, presumably, moral 
tendencies, the Church is, as it always has 
been, the last to join any movement leading towards a bet- 
terment of existing social conditions. 

This fact either proves that an ecclesiastical education 
is not always conducive to mental evolution, or that the 
shepherds of the Lord's sheep fear for ,their own welfare 
under any other than the preseut regime. 

The early Church doubtless did much towards the eleva- 
ting of the people from the condition of dirt and damnation; 
but now that its various branches have become firmly 
established, it has settled down to a smug existence, and 
the average pulpit fighter is content to be a mere shell — 
echoing the confused murmurs of the Middle Ages. 

This attitude has made it painfully apparent to the most 
casual observer that the ministerial stomach is no more 
than human. One sometimes hears the complaint made by 
leading preachers that so few men ever enter the fold, and 
the cause to which they attribute this is that the present 
age is too restless or too busy to be much interested in 
religion. 

This is not so. The preachers themselves are to 
blame for not keeping up with the times. Men 
and women who read their papers are not in- 
clined to sit for hours in a badly ventilated church 
listening to a discourse apparently addressed to the 
spirits of our grandfathers. The watchword to-day in 
religion, as well as in everything else, is Progress; and it 
is advisable for our ministers, if they wish to regain the 
confidence of the people, to awake from their heavy sleep 
and preach, not the past, but the world as it exists to- 
day. Such theological pugilists as Father Yorke and the 
Rev. Ross may for a time amuse the onlookers, but that is 
all. Such discourses are addressed to the "gods,'' and the 
"gods" are not supposed to know much. 

To summarily dispose of the whole question, the position 
of the ministry is remarkably like that of the monkey on a 
rotten bough, with a deep stream at the far end and an 
audience of other monkeys above. To attract their atten- 
tion it is necessary for the wretched thing to caper; and 
the possibility of the branch breaking, and a consequent 
fatal immersion, affords matter for grim humor to all save 
the one most concerned. 

Improvement The River Improvement Convention, which 

of the is to meet here on the 15th inst., will be 

Waterways, composed of Supervisors from couuties in 

the San Joaquin and Sacramento Valleys, 

and of other prominent citizens of those counties, uniting 

with representatives of the Chamber of Commerce and 



January 4, 1896. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



iy. The I 
will choav irboM duty It will be 

lion at Washington. The primary 
11 in the ■ 
improvement of the Sacrami 

matter of importance, and, with 
the proper effort, a favorable influence on legislation may 
ad. It must be 1 that California has not, In 

the past, secured a doe share ol the Government approprl 
nctit of rivers and harbors. Of hue years, 
.i (rreat advantage over us in tiiis re- 
• e reason that has hindered California in I his re- 
gard is lack of harmony among her representatives at 
Washington, and another impediment is the jealousy exist- 
ing between rival localities. The latter cause has. for many 
years, delayed the construction of a deep-water harbor for 
the Los Angeles district. San Pedro, Redondo, and Santa 
Monica are riva 3, and the people of Los Angeles 

have divided their support among these ambitious places. 
Had there been unity of sentiment on the subject, Los 
Angeles would, ere this, have been provided with a sali- 
harbor for deep-water vessels. 

But what more directly concerns San Francisco is the 
improvement of her own harbor by the removal of a num- 
ber of dangerous rocks, and also the deepening- and clear- 
ing of the navigable rivers tributary to our system of 
It is not generally known that it is the work of 
years, under the present rules governing the action of Con- 
gress, to obtain an appropriation for any river or harbor. 
First there must be adopted a provision for a preliminary 
survey and report by Government engineers. This is em- 
bodied in the general river and harbor bill. And as but 
one such bill is passed by each Congress, two j'ears or 
more must elapse before an appropriation can be had for 
the proposed improvement. Meanwhile, the fate of the 
appropriation must depend upon the favor of the engineers. 
In the event of an unfavorable report, no appropriation 
can be had. At one period the appropriations for un- 
heard-of creeks and sloughs constituted a national scandal, 
and the river and harbor bill was a matter of log-rolling, 
pure and simple. Now the appropriations are divided 
upon a meritorious system, as Government engineers are 
rarely found wanting in judgment or integrity. But, as- 
suming that all the projects approved by the engineers are 
worthy of Government aid, the advantages of " push and 
pull " are still exhibited in the amounts recommended by 
the Committee on Commerce for the various waterways. 
It is in this regard that the executive committee to be ap- 
pointed by the coming convention may do good work. A 
comprehensive plan of river and harbor improvements for 
California should be mapped out, with the assistance of 
Government engineers inclined to give their aid. Then this 
plan should be diligently urged, through the press and at 
Washington, until the desired action shall have been se- 
cured. 

In its deliberations it is to be hoped that the convention 
will not be bothered by cranks, and that it will not allow 
itself to be used for the promotion of schemes of purely 
local benefit. The town of Redding, for example, is am- 
bitious to become a river port. It is situated above a suc- 
cession of rapids on the Sacramento river, and Major 
Heuer, the Government engineer having charge of the 
Sacramento, reported some time ago that the improve- 
ment of the river between Red Bluff and Redding would 
be a waste of public money. It would certainly appear 
that a Government appropriation would be much more 
wisely expended in improving the main channels, natur- 
ally navigable, than in the attempt to bring a small and 
remote town within reach of river steamers. This, how- 
ever, is a question to be decided on its merits. The con- 
vention may be expected to be on its guard in relation to 
giving endorsement to doubtful projects, and to work har- 
moniously for the promotion of the main purpose in view. 



An Able Argument The argument recently delivered by 

by D. M. Delmas before judge Buck, of 

D. M. Delmas. the Superior Court of San Mateo 

County, in relation to the Lux estate, 

was one of the ablest efforts of that distinguished lawyer. 

It has excited much admiring comment among attorneys, 



and it would In- difficult to liml anything more eoinprehen 

slve and Incisive in the way of a legal analysis of evii - 
It v\a- eloquent from beginning to end, and yet wholly 

Ileal and business like in dealing with a succession of 

business propositions, Even dry matters of account, In 
the hands of this gifted advocate, become full of interest, 
and columns of Hgures seem animate with life. Severe 
as this brilliant forensic effort was in its arraignment of 
the opposing parties, it was throughout marked by the 
perfection of courtesy. Even to the objects of the eminent 
counsel's attack this studious urbanity was displayed. 
While blows wen- given with telling Force they were at all 
times delivered in the manner of one who would rather 
compliment than denounce, To the opposing counsel. 

ially, Mr. Delmas was more than polite. He hand 

somel] complimented the argument of Mr. Mclnernev, to 

which his own vigorous effort was a Strong reply, and cer- 
tainly the elder barrister lost nothing by thus praising the 
ability of his adversary. In this regard Mr. Delmas sets 
to the bar of this city and of the State an example worthy 
of imitation. Occupying the first place as an advocate, 
he can afford to be geuerous, and assuredly he is more than 
kind to his legal brethren. This characteristic amiability 
is the more remarkable from its dwelling in a legal mind 
of the most penetrating and logical cast. So completely 
master of himself is this accomplished jurist that lie 
serenely smiles even when applying the lash of his merci- 
less satire to the objects of his attack. His late argument 
illustrated the fact that the greatest strength of intellect 
is never more strikingly displayed than when, under the 
strain of an important contest at the bar, an eloquent 
pleader is master of himself as weli as of his cause, using 
a copious vocabulary and rare powers of invective with a 
moderation and a tact that constantly hint of abundant 
forces in reserve. Contrast this style of argumentation 
with that of some of the blustering blatherskites of the 
San Francisco bar, and what a gulf appears between 
them I The younger generation of advocates, who have 
the sagacity to take Mr. Delmas as a model of forensic 
grace and skill, will at least win credit for good taste, 
though few of them may aspire to reach the enviable po- 
sition he has gained. 

War Some of the peculiarities of the Jingo are that he 
Talk, thinks he is the only patriotic American alive; 
that he always carries a chip on his shoulder; 
that he is always ready to have his country go to war to 
retrieve a fancied disgrace, and to let other people do the 
fighting for him and his beloved country. He is found 
chiefly among politicians who have not yet learned the 
alphabet of statesmanship, and among that class of the 
people who have neither houses nor lands, nor bank ac- 
counts, nor much merchandise, nor bullion, nor gold, nor 
silver coin laid up for future needs. But behind these 
inordinately effulgent beings is the great body of thinking 
and responsible people, who do not follow the jingo method 
of going off at halF-cock, and who have a way of develop- 
ing a sober second thought which, after all, is the only 
basis of rational and prudent conduct. Men of means and 
responsibility, people of observation and thought, who 
sooa saw what war meant to America and all mankind 
were aghast at the flippant ease with which they were 
ready to involve the country into any kind of disaster. 
Though at first we heard of nothing but an apparent unan- 
imity of feeling and will, yet there has now come a deep 
undertone of dissatisfaction and horror at the possibility 
of a war with England. It is not that there is wanting 
any broad and deep petriotism, nor any lack of sensitive- 
ness upon any point of honor. There is a feeling of suspicion 
that the President might have formed his message m 
language a little more moderate, and a desire to be sure 
that the Monroe doctrine is necessarily threatened with 
violation, and a decent hope and belief that the matter of 
artitrotion might longer have been left open to argument, 
with the possibility that further discussion might eventu- 
ate in persuading England to accord with our suggestion. 
There is no wish on the part of anybody but Jingos to 
have war. There is no wish on the part of England to 
hasten it. The question is plainly not one of such 
gigantic importance that it may not yet be settled in a 
decent and peaceable manner, and no man hang his head 
for shame. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 




Comstock The holiday season is not the time to look for 
Mining much activity in the market for Comstock 
Snares. mining shares. While business has been dull 
lately, prices have, however, been well-sus- 
tained, and, at the close, a hardening tendency is noted for 
the middle shares, especially Occidental. Dealers should 
not overlook the Brunswick lode as a factor in the business 
from this time forth. The properties there which have 
been incorporated with older companies at the North End, 
may open up some day, and send shares booming when 
least expected. All that is needed to help the Comstock 
out is a head to manipulate the stocks as of old, and the 
ease of money, which is the chief and main auxiliary. With- 
out the latter it is useless to expect much from brain power 
alone, which is all well enough to conceive, while helpless to 
execute unaided by the paltry pelf for which everybody is 
striving. The American Plat scheme seems to be dying 
a natural death. If one has to wait until the Sutro Tun- 
nel paupers can revive it, the present generation will 
never reap any results from the enterprise. It would be 
worth somebody's while to advance the merits of this min- 
ing proposition a little. 

Gold Mines For the first time in a very long time the 
Are now new year opens up with a very bright pros- 

ln Demand, pect for mining in California. It is doubt- 
ful whether, since the days of the "rush" in 
1K4!>, the outlook has been more favorable than it is just 
now. And the best of it is there is no sentiment about the 
present movement, nor is there a feverish excitement 
about it upon which to predicate a "boom" or the undue 
inflation resulting from an era of reckless speculation 
which invariably reflects eventually such injury upon the 
community at large. The growing demand is now based 
upon the march of progressive improvement which, having 
developed other industries to a point from which at pres- 
ent there is no possible expansion, now returns to one field 
unlimited in its extent and possibilities, and which practi- 
cally has never been more than scratched upon the surface. 
An idea suggested in some quarter that the probability of 
war with Great Britain would serve to check gold mining, 
is nothing more than an idea. If some of these alarmists 
could only protract their nervous, over-wrought ex- 
istence in a sphere of vain imaginations, until the two 
great nations of the earth clash on the bloody field of 
battle, they would be as old as Methuselah. There was no 
necessity for the recent display of jingoism in high 
quarters at Washington, which led to the loss, within a 
few short days, of no less than $500,000,000 by people on 
both sides of the Atlantic. The mutual and combined in- 
terests of both countries are too heavy to permit either to 
cater to the whims of asetof politicians who talk for talk's 
sake. Why, even the Queen herself, although it may not 
be generally known, owns some of the finest and most 
profitable income paying property in New York, on Broad- 
way from the Battery up to Canal street, showing as good 
a sense of business as a host of her subjects who are up to 
their cars in American investments. There is not much like- 
lihood of these people bombarding their own property at 
the risk of millions for the sake of a miserable coyote hole 
in South America. There need be no distrust felt on this 
score in regard to any possible bearing on the mining 
interests. 

Protection The trend of public opinion in this city is 

for evidenced by the activity recently developed 

Investors, among the mining men, and the means which 

are being taken to control the business so as 

to protect themselves and the public against the schemes 

of sharpers. The San Francisco Stock Exchange has not 

only voted to list all reputable gold mines free, but have 

gone even further, and forwarded circulars to the leading 

mine owners, asking for co-operation. The Gold Mining 

Exchange, another corporation, has also been organized, 

with a charter membership consisting of a number of the 

best known and most influential mining men in the State. 

This Exchange announces that, while not dealing exclus- 



ively, as its old established neighbor on Pine street, in 
stocks of the several companies, that it will labor in bring- 
ing the mine-owner and the capitalist together, for the 
purpose of engaging the necessary means to develop prom- 
ising prospects. This will involve the employment of a 
corps of experts, whose business it will be to report on 
properties which, if approved, will be given a certificate 
to that effect, stamped with the seal of the Exchange. 
This will do away with the middle man, who, in the past, 
has lived upon plundering the public, by means of lying 
statements and misrepresentation. There should be no 
lack of money for investments in mining when the monied 
people are protected and ensured of a safe management of 
their property. Capital is over-plentiful in this city, and 
the amounts lying idle would, in the aggregate, figure up 
an enormous sum. To open up a channel where it can be 
employed to advantage, with a chance for a grand return 
upon the investment, is a work which cannot fail to meet 
with approbation in all quarters. 

New York There has been less interest manifested 
Stock Market, in stocks during the past week. For 
several days the market has been left 
almost entirely in the hands of room traders. London 
bought back a considerable amount of the stock they reck- 
lessly sold less than a fortnight ago at quite an advance. 
Speculators sold out quite an amount of the long stock- 
accumulated during the recent panic early in the week, 
but came back into the market as buyers again at a slight 
decline. Some of the better stocks are about back to their 
former prices and firmly held. Others have made rapid 
advances and are hard to secure in large amounts at cur- 
rent prices. Prices during the week have advanced 1| to 
3J per cent. Earnings are entirely satisfactory, and 
promise to continue so. In the Industrial list there has 
been generally a steady market. Sugar has led the list in 
strength. Tobacco, Leather and Gas have ruled higher. 
The high rate of interest on loans has restricted specula- 
tion, and will probably be the factor in the market for 
some time to come. 

An Old-time Fire The eighty-sixth annual financial state- 
Company, ment of the Hartford Fire Company, of 
Hartford, Connecticut, has been issued. 
The statement shows that this sturdy old pioneer of 
the fire insurance business has been renewing its youth 
as the years roll on, a credit to the institutions of this 
country, among which it ranks as a giant. With a gross 
annual income of $7,060,163, it now holds as a surplus to 
policy holders the magnificent sum of $4,150,893. During 
the year ended on January 1, 1896, the Hartford increased 
its assets $5*3,477.47, added $164,349.75 to its re-insurance 
reserve, and 1400; 540 to its net surplus. The total assets 
are now set down at $9,229,213.09, with a reserve for re- 
insurance of $4,404,238, a reserve for all unsettled claims 
of $674,081.08, and a net surplus over everything, including 
capital stock, of $2,900,893. The managers of the Pacific 
department of this substantial company, with head offices 
in this city, are Henry K. Belden, chief, and Whitney 
Palaehe, assistant. 

Business The bank clearings for the year show a 
Picking Up. healthy gain over 1894 amounting to $692,- 
070, 240, as against $658,526,806 for the pre- 
ceding year. This is satisfactory, and promises well for 
1896. A large amount of money went into circulation dur- 
ing the past two days. In addition to the semi-annual 
interest of the savings banks and the payments on City, 
County, and State bonds, a large number of outside bonds 
and securities have just disbursed dividends. Among the 
local corporations may be mentioned the Capital Gas Com- 
pany, of Sacramento, $1, and the Stockton Gas Light and 
Heat Company, ISO cents. 

Annual Treasure The receipts of treasure at this port 
Receipts. per Wells, Fargo & C'o.'s Express dur- 

ing the twelve months ending December 
31st, 1805, were as follows: From the interior, $21,725,878; 
from the north coast, $747,405; total, $22,473,373. The de- 
scriptions and amounts were as follows: Coin, $10,218,580; 
silver bullion, $2,001, 987; gold bullion, $3,652,806, The in- 
land shipments from San Francisco were $28,002,302, and 
the shipments overland were $500 in silver bullion, $35,138 
in gold bullion, and $17,117,785 in coin. 



Jam 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



ADOISON EUGENE SHAW. 



Till i.» be proud of tlu'ir 

n, the rising young 
u man Mr. Sbaw baa made 

a record which baa been 

en\ led by old and noted 
libera ;it the Bar. 

4-11 near Sacramento, 
■ thirty vcars ago, he 
was graduated from the 
ite University In 
1891, and entered the 
well-known law oil i 
POJ anil Kellogg. In 
just a year he was able 
"l^naj " . to pass a brilliant ex- 

j^^k animation with admis- 

■ B k ^b> injr into partnership 
I , •' with Mr. 1'. R. King, 

he entered upon down- 
right hard work. In 
one of his tii-st cases he 
Additon Btujeni Shaw. made a record. It was 

that of Winterbuni against the Directors of the People's 
Homo Savings Bank, when he showed up so thoroughly 
the terrible frauds and wholesale conspiracy which had 
been systematically practiced against the depositors. His 
next exploit was the case of Baker against Bricknell, 
which is now before the Supreme Court of the United 
States. It involves a title to property in San Francisco 
involving half a million of dollars, and involves many claims 
of less magnitude. Mr. Shaw has recently entered into 
business for himself, for the firm of King & Shaw was 
dissolved by mutual consent last week. Henceforth Mr. 
Shaw will conduct his business in his own name, attending 
personally to his client's affairs with that scrupulous 
regard for their interests which hitherto won him no slight 
renown. 

HARRY PIPER. 




— -v 

ALL the property-owners in San Francisco know genial 
Harry Piper, the chief assistant in the County Clerk's 
office. A native son, born in San Francisco thirty-two 
years ago, and educated 

in our public schools, he ( 

is a thorough Califor- 
nian, as well as a per- 
fect San Franciscan, in 
sentiment. A young 
man of the most rigid 
principles in regard to 
duty, the four years 
which he served in the 
Sheriff's office, under 
C h a r 1 es Laumeister, 
made him a record to 
be envied; and it is not 
at all a matter of wonder 
that he should be asked 
to the present import- 
ant position of civic 
trust which he now 
holds. During his ca- Harry Piper. 

reer in the Sheriff's office he introduced many valuable re- 
forms in the management of the county's affairs, which 
were greatly appreciated by Mr. Laumeister. So now, 
the administration of his office as Chief Deputy County 
Clerk, has had a highly beneficial effect in simplifying the 
office routine. A practical, level-headed business man, he 
has municipal affairs at his fingers' ends. 




"Bhown's Bronchial Troches" are a simple and convenient remedy 
lor Bronchial Affections and Coughs. Carry them in your pocket. Sold 
only in boxes. 

The yala days of Christmastide have been spent by the gourmets at the 
Maison Riche. Grant avenue and Geary street, where every delicacy the 
world affords is found. 



The Japanese Art. Goods and fine cloisonne ware at Geo. T. 
Marsh & Co.'s, under the Palace Hotel, surpass all else in that line. 



Fifty-sixth Half -Yearly Report 

Of the German Savings and Loan Sodem, 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SWORN STATEMENT. 

Of ttai id value of the Assets and Liabilities ol the QBRMAN 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SO b buotaoaf 

■ State ol Call 
fnrniii. iin.i where said assets Bra Bltaafc 

1 ASSETS. 

iiiiiif-ms Kirsi Mori d Bonds ol 

Bastern States and Stale of California, and 
Untied States i per eenl registered bonds, the 

actual value of which Is £.603.640 no 

1,936,850 00 Miscellaneous) - peel Railway, Water, 

Light, and other Corporation Brsl mortgage 

bonds, the actual < alue of which is 3.0rtfl,o30 00 

All of said bonds are kepi In the vaults of the 
Corporation 
1.(60,000 00 United States iper cent registered and mlsoei 
; laneous railroad firs! mortgage bonds, die actual 

value ol which is 1,145,000 00 

These bonds are kept In a box in the vaults of 
:iui1 rented from the New York Stock Exchange 
Safe Deposit Company in New York City 



65,883,250 00 65,714.570 00 

Standing on the boohs of the Corporation at 5,447,537 60 

2 Promissory notes secured by first mortgages on re:i! estate, 

within this State, the States of Oregon, Washington, Ne- 
vada, and the Territory of Utah. The actual value of said 
promissory notes is 34,140,040 03 

3 Miscellaneous railroad, cable and street railway and other 
corporation bonds and stock certificates pledged to the 

society for the amount of 872,000 00 

All said notes, bonds and certificates are held and kept 
by said corporation in its own vaults. 

4 Bank buildiug and lot, the actual value of which is 180,000 00 

5 Other real estate situated in the States of California and 

Oregon, the actual value of which is 252,531 77 

6 Furniture in the bank office of said corporation 1,000 00 

7 Cash in United States coin and currency, the actual value of 

which is 1 .735,804 25 

Total $32,628,903 74 



LIABILITIES. 

To depositors : Said Corporation owes deposits amounting 

to, and the actual value of which is $30,727,586 59 

To stockholders : The amount of capital stock actually paid 

up. the value of which is 1,000.000 00 

The condition of said liability to stockholders is that no 
part of the amount can be paid to them or in any way be 
withdrawn, except inpayment of losses during the existence 
of the corporation, nor until all depositors shall have been 
paid in full the amount of their deposits and accrued divi- 
dends . 
To depositors and stockholders: 

(a) The amount of the reserve fund, the actual value of 

which is 715,000 00 

Including the amount of matured but uncollected inter- 
est on loans and securities 

(b) The amount of the contingent fund, the actual value of 

which is 56,279 54 

The condition of said funds is, that the same have been 
created for the purpose of additional security to depositors 
against losses. 

State, City and County taxes assessed by the Government, 
but not yet payable 130,037 61 



Total. 



.$33,038,903 74 



B A BECKER, 
President of the German Savings and Loan Society. 

GEO. TOURNY. 
Secretary of the German Savings and Loan Society. 

State of California, City and County of San Francisco— ss. 

B. A BECKER and GEORGE TOURNY, being each separately 
duly sworn, each for himself, says : That said B A BECKER is President 
and that said GEORGE TOURNY is Secretary of THE GERMAN SAV- 
INGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the corporation above mentioned, and that 
the foregoing statement is true. 

B. A. BECKER, 
GEO. TOURNY. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of December, 1895. 
[Seal] GEO. T. KNOX, 

Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

RD D | r*r\ Dn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
UT\. nl^\jr\U O ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 
J. G. STEELE &. CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, $1 25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, 
S3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for circular. 




SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 4, 1896. 



<£&? & 




Henri/ T>. &,&e/nw •. £J 



Henry X>. J3i§p/0W 



@NCE upon a time, some dozen years ago, I spent a 
most extraordinary New Years in Sonoma County, 
just on the edge of Mendocino's boundary — up toward 
Crane's Peak. It was very clear and frosty weather, 
just following a storm that had wrecked two of the biggest 
redwoods near our cabin, and compelled Billy Ham and 
myself to go out looking for ninety and nine sheep which 
had gone astray. Poor things! We wei-e bad manageis, 
and lots of tiny lambs which should have been babies 
later on were lying dead on the frosty hill-side. We were 
very blue over the prospect ourselves, and went back to 
the cabin to warm up on hot coffee. 

There we found old man Temple, an ancient Missouri 
resident — our nearest neighbor, and six miles away — 
drinking with both hands around the coffee pot; gulping 
and gasping at every swallow. Temple was six feet one, 
sixty years old, with a paunch upon him that would have 
put Sancho Panza to the blush. I believe his constitution 
might always have been described as anaemic. 

"What- you b'en?" was his genial salutation, as here- 
placed the coffee pot on the glowing embers of the chimney 
fire — (we had no stove). "I come in here cold, an' I jes 
thought I'd warm up some." Then he carefully stroked 
his only adornment— a straggly chin whisker; that's all 
one could call it. 

His eyes were as bleary as those of his gaunt, steaming 
broncho tied to the moss covered rail of the corral. Smoke 
arose from the nostrils of the unfortunate animal as it tried 
to drag itself and the fence into the warmth of the rising 
sun. 

"Have some!" exclaimed Temple, offeringa black bottle. 

There was only a half inch in the bottom — but we knew 
better than to put our tongues to it, for it was old man 
Temple's habit to drink pure alcohol, in accordance with 
the "excess of excess" which has been the curse of many a 
rancher in the hills. 

"Say, I b'en down to Fiske's Mills, along with old man 
McAppin, an' I sort of lost him, round by old Hauser's 
bridge. Have a drink." 

It was for us an amusing situation. But we urged him 
to pour the "wee drap" in his bottle down his own gullet, 
on top of the coffee. He did so, and never winced. 

"To-morrow's New Years," he observed, as Billy and I 
began to shake up the fire 1 and cook our breakfast. 

have a good time." 
want you boys to 
come over to the ranch an' enjoy things. Maw's going to 
get up more'n we can eat, if we eat all day. She's going 
to have, cracklins, an' corn-pones, an' fried chicken!" 

Now this was very alluring, for old "Maw" Temple could 
cook in the sanctified Southern style, and almost to per- 
fection. 

"We got some young deer meat, too," added Temple 
casually. 

This decided it at once. We gave the old fellow a break- 
fast, his horse a bite from our meagre store of barley, and 
promised to be at his New Years dinner next afternoon. 
Then we solemnly and courteously aided him to mount his 
jaded steed and steered him toward the Walhalla trail. 
As he departed, his saddle-bag— a rough potato sack- 
dropped off into a bunch of wild rose bush next the hog- 
pen, and a full bottle of more alcohol fell out of its mouth, 
also, a big, fat can. 

We hastened to replace his stores, tying them safely by 
the saddle leathers. 



"Yes," I replied, "and I hope you'll 1 
"Well, I bet!" he answered, "an' I 



"That big can's going to be mince pie for maw," said 
Temple, gratefully; "Mis' Fred Liebig, she had that all 
fixed up for maw. You like mince pie? Well, you jes' see 
our New Years feed when maw takes hold. Have a pull on 
the other bottle? No? Say, I wasn't sinkin' that from 
you, boys; I only forgot about it." 

And presently he was down the trail, confident of his 
poor, old, tired horse's footsteps. 

* * * * 

We — that is. my partner Billy Ham and myself — aban- 
doned our high mountain fastness, about noon, New Years 
Day, and left sheep, cows, pigs, and horses with the warm 
sunshine. In a ci-ow's flight it would be a quick jump to 
Temple's ranch. In fact, one could shout across the can- 
yon when he was out on the range, and after awhile hear 
his shrill, falsetto answer. 

Taking a precipitous trail, we stumbled down the i-ocky 
descent, among the redwoods, across the creek, and up- 
ward through the brush till we reached the slippery, wet 
grass of last year on the western hillside. A "gullied" 
wood road was next in order, and after that one could turn 
and look toward the splendid blue, wall of the Pacific 
Ocean, which rose up many miles away to welcome the 
New Year and to worship the sun. 

"Mr. Temple, Esquire" (as he used to straggle his sig- 
nature) was possessed of a rambling domicile, which had 
stretched from a log cabin, during his long occupancy, 
into a respectable habitation, for those regions. The main 
part was ten logs high, and all sorts of additions had been 
made by the aid of shakes and rough boards. 

The two acre orchard was grunting with hogs, hard at 
work on the remnants of the winter apples. 

Two ragged, pretty children came down to the gate, 
just below the house. They were twins, and were grand- 
children of the Temples. When their immediate parentage 
had ever disappeared, no one seemed to know in this lonely 
district, but for the past seven years "old man Temple" 
and his wife had housed, fed, and half-clothed the little 
daughters of his wayward child and her deceiver. 

"I think they's somewhar's in Arizona," he would say; 
"but you kain't tell gen'elly. Loretta, she was good; but 
that nigger singer came along when she was down to 
school in Santa Rosa, an' first we know they sent me an' 
maw the twins." 

The twins were white-headed little seven-year old ras- 
cals. Their thin calico gowns were sufficient in the noon- 
day — for now the sun was warm; but their bare feet seemed 
painfully sensitive. Both were out of breath. 

"Say!" they cried, both at a time, "Nelly an' Minty's 
run off with the well, an' gran'paw — he's awful mad! 
Gran'maw's got him to bed quick!" 

This would be an enigma to the uninitiated; but "Nellie" 
and "Minty" were two razor-backed mules which formed a 
portion of Temple's personal estate. How they could have 
run away with the family well was a problem so extra- 
ordinary that we patted the excited little girls on the 
head, and gave them a lot of picture papers for a Christ- 
mas present — all we could do! — and then strode up the 
path to the lengthy cabin. 

There was poor old Mrs. Temple — a tiny, silver-locked 
creature, with a wizened face. "Wizened" is no word for 
it! Every county on the map of Texas was expressed in 
the tangled wrinkles of her sixty years. 

"Happy New Year!" exclaimed Billy and I in unison, as 
we swung the merry twins on to the steps. 

Mrs. Temple wrung her hands in grief. 

"Paw's mos' gone crazy!" she wailed. 

"What's the matter?" 

" Oh, he come home 'bout sun up, an' he fed that Betty 
mare a shift of mince pie meat Mis' Liebig sent up from 
round Timber Cove. We don't get no pies this time. Then 
he went and spoiled all the well, an' he says I'm blamed! " 



Janum 



>.\N FRANC : VVS l.I.I 



wiping 

bell, an' the 

. an the well, and Kichard Henry Temple i> 

eath bv that well. 

s mad like fury 1 

Ket an' all the w< 

nottiiu' else but save him out. an' now he says 






Henry Temple, he come home this mornin ." 

ued tin' poor " grandma w," weeping, "an' he says 

I was mad, coz' hi own to the coast. 

He says I'm thirsty, an I'm srom' to have water this 

time.' 

"I thought it warn't good, considerin' bis breath, an he 
went out looking for that cussed ol' well. He got mad 
when the rope wouldn't work, and that's when it happened!" 

Now, it may be parenthetically explained that the Tem- 
ple Ranch was so situated that, owing to the rocky nature 
of the country, the proprietor had been compelled to dig a 
forty-foot well just behind bis rough and tumble kitchen. 
Contrary to precedent in such eases, his windlass sup- 
ported but a single bucket, which had once been a small 
pickle keg. To bring up this bucket full of icy water, one 
would have to turn a most unwieldy crank, half wood, the 
handle iron. 

' 'Paw.' says I," continued Mrs. Temple, " 'ain't you 
r go rest ? The twins' 11 see you 'jus like you air now. 
You don't want nothin' more for drink.' " 

" ' I'm parched,' he says, ' an' I'm goin' for cold water,' 
an' theu off th' damn ol' fool goes to th' well rail, an' was 
mad 'coz the bucket was all empty. He was tryin' to pull 
on the rope, so's to seud it down. First thing I see — Paw 
goes with it! Forty foot down, in four foot of ice water!" 

"Is he dead!" we both cried with alarm, for, with all 
the old man's faults we loved his New Years dinner still. 

"Paw? — he's all right; it's the well-gear! He's makin' 
terrible trouble! " You ain't got no sense, child! Why. 
paw went down that thar well, an' he stood in all that 
water, four feet deep, an' he hollers up to me, ' maw, wind 
up the rope! 

[Another break in the narrative. Mrs. Temple had been 
worn out by the desperation which a rancher's wife too 
often reaches.] 

" I jes' tried an' tried to wind up that ol' crank, an' the 
twins they had a hold of me. We was afraid he'd get froze 
besides drowned. We got him half up twice, and then that 
thar old crank went back on us' and the kids. It just sent 
Fan one way an' Kit the next. I held on, an' went last, 
an' paw he yells up when he drops splash back again in 
that thar' well: 'Maw, maw! What in hell you doin' to 
me ! Ain't I be'n a kind paw, an' ain't I be'n indulgent 
gran 'paw!' 

"Why, say!" continued the tearful old lady, " I'd let 
him drop twenty feet! '" — down in that thar water again! 
Jus' think! Why, I was crazy! 

" ' Paw! ' I called down after the splash stopped — ' paw, 
I'll get you up ! Just you wait ! ' — an' I went off to the 
corral, an' I got " Nellie " an' "Minty," our two mules. 
Say! they cost money! — an' I harnessed them up, an' I put 
an ol' ox-chain on top of the well-gear an' then I started 
off pulling on their bits. When we got to th' fence I 
whacked hard, right on top of them, an', if you could have 
seen that "Nellie" mule an' that " Minty " mule start 
across through the fences an' across th' field, you'd think 
they was racing. But the well rope went along, an' Richard 
Henry Temple he come up so quick he never was able to 
pick himself out of the ol' bucket till it got to the fence." 

" ' Gran'paw! ' says I, when I was easin' him off th' field 
to get home, ' gran'paw, you're most dead! ' "Why, he 
was all of a shaky shivering! 

"Then them ol' mules they kep' on going, an' gran'waw 
he seen the well works and the ox-chain after 'em down the 
gulch." 

" ' Susan Temple! ' says he, ' you are a damn old fool! " 

" 'But,' says I, 'you'd have froze to death!' " 

" ' You broke th' well! ' he says; ' an' first you tried to 



drowi an' 

. - 

i kep tryin' to --till 
n gettin' him wormed up," 

"Wl ; Billj II. in I. I- your kettle 

on the lirc> '.' 1 1 up and some - 

here we are steaming 
" Ami with that Touch- 

gran'paw 

The patient rose as ii from a trai d the 

scalding water down as if it were bis favorite alcohol. 
"Thebestold gin I ever struck,' he observed as he 

Led his lips. 'Come, let's go Bnd the mules." 
The mules were only just across the Held, in the brush. 
The well rope and its gearing were too obstinate, and bad 

tangled them Up till they couldn't kick, Meanwhile, 

an 'maw " Temple prepared her "corn pones" and 

her "fried chicken, so that we had New Year's dinner 
all the same. 

Yet all the while the ungrateful old Temple would mur- 
mur sullenly: 

" You busted the well an' you most lost the mules! " 
As for Kit and Fan, the poor little twins, we told them 
stories of ''Cinderella" and " Red Riding Hood" till their 
curly beads nodded; then we climbed down toward home. 

There is no place better known or more popular than the Original 
Swain's Baker}', 213 Sutter street. It stands without a rival and has 
stood the test for years. The most delicious meals are served by 
gentlemanly attendants, and the management takes pride in having 
everything orderly. It is just the place for business men and ladies 
out shopping to lunch. 

WALTER BAKER & CO., UMr™ 

Established Dorchester, Mass., 1780. 

Breakfast Cocoa; 




It bears their 
Trado Mark 

" La Belle 
Chocolatiere" 
on every can. 



Absolutely 

Pure. 
No Chemicals. 



BEWARE OF 
IMITATIONS, 

Always ask for Walter Baker & Co.'s 

Breakfast Ooooa, 

Made at 
DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Eg ^DS^WtKSviW^SNiAs^^KoNdli^SKD^ 'Sis 



Dave Samson, 

PROGRESS 
RESTAURANT. 



Fine Mercantile Lunch. 
Imported Pilsener, Franciscaner, 
and Extra Pale Lager on draught. 

327 and 329 Bush St. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-maliers, 
canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F 



Tel. 5610. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 




CAN it be that the chaiige of a number in the figures 
that mark the year plays any vital part in the destiny 
of man ? Yet it is at this annual adding of one that one's 
retrospection of the preceding twelve months is keenest, 
one's contrition deepest, while at the same time the roses 
of optimism never bloom fairer than in the biting air of the 
new January. As I write the epitaph of the year 
theatrical 1895 my brutal candor is assuaged only by a 
natural revulsion for adding to the damnation of the dead, 
and the gleeful and hilarious, although entirely unfounded, 
hopefulness that each year I find in contemplation of the 
quick. So far as the drama is concerned — or what part 
of it dribbled its way into San Francisco during the twelve 
months of the late lamented's existence — I am glad that 
the embalmers art is not mine. A noiseless interment, or 
the consuming scorch of the crematory, is better fitted to 
the final rites of this eventless step toward a new centui-y. 
Looking backward at a year of lusterless stars, thread- 
bare plays and the worse than usual procession of medioc- 
rity relieved at long intervals by some stray flash of 
originality in play making, or an actor awakened to the 
meaning of his art, does not add to the beatification of that 
process of mental indigestion known as memory. To my 
thinking, a man's mind is but an imperfect thing until it 
can be adjusted to forget all happenings unworthy of a 
niche in our mental store-houses. 

The Baldwin Theatre opened the season of 1895 with the 
Tavary Opera Company. My strongest recollection of 
this organization is of a trio in which the contralto panted 
in fiery Italian, the tenor wheezed the ghost of a once 
great voice in French and the barytone expectorated in 
German. They were only three, but never since the fall 
of Babylon has such soul-stirring polyglot been voiced. 

Ward and James followed the Tavary Company in a 
brave revival of the legitimate. Mr. James, I remember, 
had to act with one eye; nevertheless it was a wholesome 
feast of the ever palatable, characterized by the excellent 
mountings, and stage direction that are conspicuous where- 
ever the hand of Warde is guiding. They went to the 
California later and played Runnymede. Whatever be the 
merits or de-merits of Runnymede, no play of modern times 
has evoked such thunder in its fall. It is echoing yet. 

A Gaiety Girl came, and although its fun was vague, 
the music was the cleverest of its class that has been 
heard here. 

Marie Burroughs' endeavor at Juliet was the next event 
of interest. This was before Mrs. Pat Campbell's end of 
the century version had taught London what a high- 
bi-ed, discreet little maiden Juliet really was, or perhaps 
Miss Burroughs would not have gasped so violently, nor 
loved so hard. 

Dropping a tear for pretty little Dorothy Morton and 
The Fencing Master, I skip a seines of blank weeks and re- 
call the formal opening of the Columbia Theatre by the 
Frawley Company. A modest little band of players they, 
and arriving propitiously when the principal opposition 
houses had closed their doors, soon won a favorite place in 
the public's esteem. To be sure Mr. Frawley's habitual 
easting of himself in the leading roles grew wearisome; 
however, the plays were well chosen and comparatively un- 
hackneyed, and the company for the most part painstak- 
ing and efficient. 

The Baldwin re-opened with the Lyceum Theatre Com- 
pany in The Case of Rebellious Swan, a problem comedy 
admirably acted, but not refreshing. The Amazons was 



THE YL7\R AT THC 

theatres ♦ ■■■ - ♦ 

BY ASHTON P STEVCNb. 

real comedy; light even to evanescence, and clean and 
dainty in every one of its fanciful lines. The night most 
luminous in my recollection of the year is that on which 
the curtain rose on An Ideal Husband. Wilde's amazing 
dexterity with words, his drastic epigrams, each a eameo 
of purest English, and his superb construction, where 
every line and incident fell with the nicety of crystalliza- 
tion left an impression that will not soon be effaced. 

A Company headed by Rose Coghlan, Henry E. Dixey 
and Mam-ice Barrymore succeeded the Frawley Company 
at the Columbia in August. Twelfth Night was the open- 
ing piece, and for the lack of adequate stage direction, it 
was a wretched performance despite the good people in 
the cast. A Woman of No Importance, given later by the 
same players, introduced another inimitable society drama 
by Wilde and afforded some skillful acting for Miss Coghlan 
and Mr. Barrymore. 

John Drew and Maud Adams came to the Baldwin at 
about this time, presenting a new play by Henry Arthur 
Jones, The Bauble Shop. Mr. Drew's surprising ability 
for a serious part and the dramatic strength of the second 
act compelled an interest in a play, which, taken as a 
whole, is not up to Jones' standard. Besides the repertory 
of his preceding season, Drew honored us with the 
premUre of Carleton's now defunct That Imprudent Young 
Couple; a play, I believe, killed by the countless lines in 
pitiable attempt at epigram that a character named 
Goltry ground out with a dismal deliberation that delayed 
the final curtain until 11:30. It is becoming a habit 
among the gentlemen of the dramatic columns of the 
Eastern press to single out John Drew as the most 
harrowing example of the degenerating actor; a custom 
attributable more to his ill fortune in choosing a new play 
than any decline in his artistic work. John Drew, in his 
own cheery sphere, is peerless, and in Maud Adams he 
has a companion player that it would be impossible to re- 
place. 

Preceded by an inflated newspaper reputation, 
Pauline Hall payed her long promised visit to San 
Francisco, bringing with her that most stupid of musical 
comedies, Dorcas, in which she evidenced no singing ability 
and not much more skill as an actress. 

Trilby stands out in bold relief as the popular success of 
the season. Potter's play was powerful, and the startling 
possibilities of the character Svengali — this slimy, snake- 
like man whose transcendent genius shone above all his 
repulsive villainy — were developed with masterly art by 
Wilton Lackaye. 

The Bostonians enjoyed a luxurious season of five weeks 
at the Columbia, giving us, besides that immortal com- 
posite Robin Hood, two new operas; one of which (.1 War 
Time Wedding ) made a distinctive success. 

Unlike Pauline Hall's, De Wolf Hopper's visit showed a 
justification for the highest praises that have been sung 
of him. Wang and Dr. Syntax were in themselves nothing 
remarkable, but Hopper's unusual methods and the 
paradox of a singing comedian with a voice gave him in- 
stantaneous recognition. 

Helena, a sterling play of Sardou's, new to us, but by 
no means an infant, was the feature of Robert Downing's 
recent engagement at the California. 1498 at the 
Baldwin and l'ollicking, rotund May Irwin in The Widow 
Jones at the California practically closes our year of the 
play. 

In addition to the productions emunerated, we have 
seen three of the 365 works annually penned by the 
indefatigable Mr. Hoyt, two score of grand, comic and 
spectacular operas at the Tivoli, 1800 homicides at the 
Grand, all sorts and conditions of plays at the Alcazar and 
i I don't know how many exhilarating specialties at the 
Orpheum. But for even, unmolested infecundity San 
i Francisco's dramatic year 1895 takes the palm. 






SAN FRANCISCO XI US LETTER. 





<wm 



■ 



h 



Y admiration for Wiiard Herrmann s 
nimbleness of hand always hat 
i with his - of tongue, and 

halved In wonderment at his in- 
i.'rity in the gentle art of 
- advertising, for, besides being by nature 
gifted with a most thrilling likeness "f what we imagine is 
the pi ect of the great father of black- art, His 

Serenity, M. Herrmann is one of the greatest 
snowmen of our times. None know better than he how to 
imbed their personality in the public mind, and few relax- 
ations are healthier or more amusing than an evening with 
this mystifying gentleman. Herrmann's return week at 
the Baldwin is the first strain that San Francisco can re- 
member on his popularity. His bullet-oatcbing feat is a 
marvelous deception, and. up to the present writing, has 
defied satisfactory explanation, hot the balance of the per- 
formance, given a few weeks previous at the California, is 
too fresh in the memory of theatre-goers to have war- 
ranted so early a repetition. Madame Herrmann's dances. 
which, like good pictures, seem to improve on acquaintance, 
and the bullet trick have been the bright spots in this 

week's entertainment. 

* * # 

Louis James, always a favorite here, comes to the Cal- 
ifornia Monday evening, supported by an excellent com- 
pany. Besides Virginias, Macbeth, and Othello, in each of 
which roles he has enviable fame. Mr. James will give us 
Marmiov, an adaptation of Scott's poem, and his interpre- 
tation of Hamlet, said to be a radical and interesting por- 
trayal of the Dane. The first week's repertory is: Mon- 
day, Tuesday, and Sunday nights and Saturday matinee, 
Virginias; Wednesday and Thursday, Hamlet; Friday and 

Saturday. Macbeth, 

* * * 

Monday evening at the Tivoli will be presented a second 
edition of the successful mythological burlesque, Ixion, 
in which new songs, dances and specialties will be intro- 
duced. Little Gertie Carlisle and little Pearl Landers 
will each have a taking specialty, while Hartman, Leary, 
Raffael, Pache, and Misses Millard, Carle, Baker and 
Stockmeyer will introduce new songs, duets and trios. 
The sale of seats is so large that it looks as if lxion will 
have one of the greatest runs ever known at this house. 

Tin- Runaway Wife adds another to the long list of suc- 
cesses at the Grand. Next week Tom Craven's famous 
comedy drama, The Fugitive, will be given. The play 
teems with exciting incidents, relieved by timely touches of 
comedy, and offers admirable roles for the Messrs. Brinker, 
Bulter, Swain and Lothian, and the Misses Hall and 
Thropp. 

The Orpheum continues to maintain its reputation as 
one of America's greatest music halls. Manager Walter's 
indefatigable search for the cream of specialties makes of 
every performance a unique vandeville event. The holiday 
season has turned hundreds away from the doors. 

The members of the Frawley Company will, no doubt, be 
given a rousing New Year's greeting on Monday evening, 
when De Mille's powerful drama, The Lost Paradise, is to 
be presented by that popular organization. The Frawley 
company, besides the cleverness of its players, made patent 
by last season's successful engagement, comes equipped 
with some excellent new plays, which are to be mounted in 
a lavish manner. 

Leonard Grover's perennial farce, Our Boarding House, 
has been attesting its ever-mirthfulness at the Alcazar, 
this week, to a good business. Monday night will see the 
first presentation of a successful French farce-comedy, 
My Precious Baby, in which the entire strength of the com- 
pany will be demonstrated, augmented by two important 
new engagements, that of Miss Nina Gleason and Miss 
Camille Cleveland. 



Mai ,, i, v 

Nathaniel I! i,, j'„ 

drama by A. K Lan- 
caster and has been well ret i 
'" the I will mn throughout the opening week. 
During the week following nwright will give Th. 

■i Match. .l» )'..// /,//,. It. and VamilU. 

Th.- Tuesday and Friday mornlnga for ladles, tl the Lnrllne 
Baths, continue lo ba extremely popular, l.nrne parties ol Indie* p> 
regularly on these mornings to enjoy the exclusive swim aflbrded 
them. They being centrally located, nml having the tank refilled 
each day with the pure ocean Mil water, make them the favored 
bathaol Ban Franolsoo, Che emptying of the tank every night at 
I'cloCk is tree to pnblia view. 



Br,M,./lrs Tk^-^-L A1 - Haymar ft Co., Kjrporated) 
aiavvin I heatre- pr letors! 

Nextweek Monday, January 6tb. Bverv evening iludlug 

Sundiiv M:i iu Km., emenl limited lo two weeks. 

The distinguished actress, 

MARIE WAI NWRIGHT, 

Supported by b well'balanoed mni iiM.-i.rii inmiuiny. presenties* 
tor the Brst week the celebrated Buocess, "DAUGHTERS OF 
EVE," by A E. Lanoaster and Julian Magnus. A great play, 
BUperhly aoted. Tin- dramatic treat of the New Year. Second 
Week: 'The Love Chase," "An Uueiiual Match," "As You Like 
It," "Camille." 



Golumbia Theatre- 



Return of the favorites, 



The" Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 
Friedlander, Gottlob & Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 



THE POPULAR FRAWLEY COMPANY. 

The most perfect dramatic organization in America. Coming 
back in belter form and stronger than ever Commencing Mon- 
day evening, January 6th, presenting Henrv C. De Mille's pow- 
erful drama, "THE LOST PARADISE." Entire new scenery 
and costumes. 
Reserved Seals: 15c, 23c, 50c, and 75c. 

G-vll-T^a-^!^ Tk^^i. AL - HAymam &Co., (Incorporated) 
alitornia I heatre. proprietors 

Next week, Monday, January 6th. Every evening including 
Sunday. Matinee Saturday, America's * representative tra- 
gedian, 

MR. LOUIS JAMES, 

and his excellent company, including Miss Alma Kruger, Miss 
Florence Everett, Mr. William Harris, Mr. Guy Lindsley, Mr. 
Harry Langdon, and others, in magnificent scenic productions. 
Monday, Tuesday, and Suuday nights, and Saturday matinee, 
VIRGINIUS. Wednesday and Thur-day nights, HAMLET. 
Friday and Saturday nights. MACBETH. 
. 2d week: '"Marmion," ■' Romeo and Juliet." and "Othello." 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernestine Krelino. 

Proprietor and Manager 



Every evening, 
burlesque, 



The second edition of the brilliant spectacular 

IXION; or THE MAN OF THE WHEEL 

New songs. New dances. New socialisms. New specialties. 
The most perfect production ever seen in this city. 
A la-la la la la of a success. 
Popular Prices 25c and 50o 

Morosco's Grand Opera House. 

Walter Morosco, Sole Lessee and Proprietor. 

Last performances of " The Runaway Wife." 

MONDAY EVENING, January 6th— Grand scenic production of 

Tom Craven's famous comedy drama, 

THE FUGITIVE. 

Matinees Saturdays and Sundays. 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

rpneUm. street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 
To-night and during the week, a brilliant 

NEW YEAR'S BILL. 

Introducing stars of the first magnitude; Caron & Herbert, the 

Manhattan Comedy Four, Bernard Dyllyn, Clifford & Huth, and 

our unrivaled vaudeville company, 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony, 10c; Opera chairs and box 

seats, 50c. 

GrOV^er's /^IcaZar ThePalals Royal of America. 

Last nights of the success of the season, "Our Boarding House." 
Monday, January 6th, the successful French comedy, 

MY PRECIOUS BABY. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Night Prices— 10c, 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c. 
Matinee Prices— 10c, 15c, and 25c. 

I II I 1AM RPHRARn The English actress, coaches ladies and gentle 
LILLIAN DuUUAnU. men for the dramatio profession; appearances ar- 



ranged. Shakespearean classes Wednesday evenings. 
EAN ACADEMY, 913 Hyde street. San Francisco, Cal. 



SHAKESPEAR- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 



tft* % 





AT the close of a year it is a good thing that a look back- 
wards be taken to ascertain what has been accom- 
plished in the months that have taken their flight into the 
chambers of the past. It may prove interesting, therefore, 
to take a retrospective glance over what has confessedly 
been the gayest year that society in San Francisco has 
known in a decade ; but the entertainments of the swim 
have been so many and so varied in character it would be 
quite impossible in the limits of this article to enumerate 
them all, so the chief events of each month will merely be 
touched upon, commencing with the holiday week of 1894. 
That it was a brilliant one will readily be admitted, includ- 
ing as it did the debut ball of Miss Alice Hager at Armory 
Hall; the cotillion of the Friday Night Club ; the assembly 
at Golden Gate Hall, and the New Year Eve dance of the 
Monday Night Club at Lunt's Hall. Society betook itself 
in large numbers to Del Monte for the New Year festivi- 
ties, and during the first week in January the Terpsicho- 
reans gave their first dance at Miss West's school, Ed. 
Green way leading the cotillion. Thertre parties were 
quite a fad during the month, especially to hear Scheel's 
orchestra at the Auditorium, and were as a rule followed 
by suppers. Mesdames Martin and Donahue took the lead 
among the elaborate dinner givers of society, and the tea 
hostesses included Miss Clarice Sheldon, Misses Helen 
Woolworth, Ella Morgan, and Clem. Kip; Mesdames Van 
Ness, H. M. A. Miller, Horace Hill, J. F. Swift, Thomas 
Breeze, McKenna, Henry Van Wyck, J. L. Rathbone, 
and Jos. Crockett; at the latter Miss Ella Hobart's engage- 
ment to Winthrop Lester being announced. 

Among the ball givers were Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Bach- 
man, and Cutler Paige gave a cotillion preceded by a thea- 
tre party and followed by supper. Several hops took 
place at the Presidio, the disappointment of the month be- 
ing the postponement of the reception on board the flag- 
ship Philadelphia, that vessel being unexpectedly ordered 
to Honolulu. 

February's chief event was the ball given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Dan Murphy in the Maple Hall of the Palace on the even- 
ing of the 8th, aud a pleasing novelty was the charade 
party got up by Miss Minnie. Houghton, another one on the 
same lines being given by Mrs. Joe Tobin the following 
week, and Mrs. De Young inaugurated her pretty theatre 
with private theatricals. The Vaudeville Club had a meet- 
ing at Mrs. Henry Scott's on the evening of the 20th, at 
which the "German supper" was the chief feature. The 
Cotillion Club, the Friday Night Club, and the Entre Nous 
Club gave their usual dances, and the Monday evening 
Club gave a Mardi Gras assembly. Teas were in great 
form during February, as many as three and four being 
given on some days by both maids and matrons. Some of 
the ladies also gave luncheon parties at the University 
Club, and Miss Emma Butler gave one to the buds at the 
Hotel Richelieu. The pink and white wedding of Miss 
Clarice Sheldon and Cutler Paige was solemnized at St. 
Luke's Church on the 14th (St. Valentine's day). " Miss 
Mary Bourne and James Tucker were wedded at the 
Bourne residence on Broadway; and Miss Josephine Welsh 
and Dr. Stanley Stillman at St. Mary's Cathedral on 
Shrove Tuesday, afternoon and evening, while the wedding 
engagements announced included those of Miss Alice Simp- 
kins and Robert Coleman, Miss Alice Hager and Alfred 
Tubbs. The production, on the 18th, of Rwnm.ym.ede at the 
California Theatre, was the motif for numerous theatre 



parties as well as to see the "Gaiety girls" at the Baldwin. 

Lent being upon the carpet during the month of March, 
society did not indulge in anything very pronounced. Thea- 
tre parties, card parties, recitation and musical gatherings 
were plentiful, however. Miss Daisy Van Ness gave the 
first bicycle party of the season, followed by supper at the 
University Club, and Mrs. Wakefield Baker gave another. 
Among the dinner givers were Mrs. Gordon Blanding, Mrs. 
Louis Auzerais, Mesdames Martin and Donahue, and teas 
were given by Mrs. J. H. Jewett, Mrs. Ashton. and at the 
Hopkins' Art Institute. The largest gathering of the 
month was the "Trilby" party at the San Francisco Ver- 
ein Club, which was a novelty; and Mrs. David Bixler's mi 
careme dinner and musicale; the Dutch tea of the Channing 
Auxiliary was a pleasant affair, closing the month charm- 
ingly. 

The first sensation of April was the polo tournament at 
Burlingame between the club members and the army offi- 
cers from Walla Walla, resulting in the victory of the club, 
and entertaining was extensively done in honor of the vis- 
iting strangers from the north and the south. The wed- 
dings of the month were those of Miss Lillian Miles and 
Lieutenant Kilbourne on Easter Monday, the loth. Miss 
Alice Decker and Elliott McAllister, at Grace Church on 
the 16th; Miss Elsie Knox and Ed. Jennings on the 17th; 
Miss Eva Carolan and W. E. Timlow at St. Luke's Church 
on the 23d; Miss Alice Simpkins and Robert Coleman at 
Trinity on the 24th ; Miss Francis Wordnell and Fred 
Lemon at A. L. Bancroft's residence on the 29th. The 
last dance of the Assembly Club took place at Golden Gate 
Hall on the 25th; the Entre Nous closed their season with 
a dance on the 26th. and Mrs. Louis Auzerais' private 
theatrical party at the Palace Hotel, when Lovt ion Crutches 
was performed, was the final event of the month on the 
30th. The engagements of Miss Agnes Howard and Dun- 
can Hayne; Miss Lena Lux and George MeBride; Miss 
Mary Randol and Dr. Ed. Bunnell were announced. 

The novelty of May was the open-air wedding celebra- 
tion of Mrs. Elizabeth Ryer and Charles F. Joy at San 
Mateo on the 11th. Charity affairs included the steeple 
chase ridden by gentlemen in aid of the Little Jim Fund; 
an amateur theatrical performance at the California, when 
the Artist's Dream was produced for the benefit of the 
Ladies' Protection and Relief Society; the performance of 
the Yellow Curtain by the Auzerais amateurs; and the 
Romeo and Juliet burlesque by the Oakland amateurs at 
the Baldwin in aid of the Children's Hospital. The last hop 
at the Presidio took place on the 7th, and of the dancing 
club on the 10th. The engagement of Miss Alice McCut- 
cheon and Ed. Schmieden was announced at the first Simp- 
son-Coleman reception, and of Miss May Holbrook and 
Sam Knight at an elaborate dinner given by Mrs. Hol- 
brook for that purpose. 

Society, which had already begun to leave town during 
the latter half of May, departed in large numbers early in 
June — Castle Crags, San Rafael and Del Monte were the 
resorts most sought, and at Burlingame there was a con- 
stant round of dinners, luncheons, polo, golf, tennis, coach- 
iug, excursions, picnics, etc. As a consequence life in the 
city became very dull. Weddings were the chief dissipa- 
tion, and of these the most notable ceremonies were Miss 
Alice Tripler and Lieutenant Burtschat St. Luke's church 
on the 5th; Miss Alice Scott and James Brown at Grace 
Church on the 12th; Miss Alice Ziska and C. M. Jennings, 
a home wedding, on the 22d. The engagement of the month 
was Miss Mary Breeze and Lieutenant Benson, U. S. A. 

Theatre parties were the rule in July. Donald deV. 
Graham gave a studio tea, and the marriage of Miss Belle 
McPherson to Lieutenant McCracken was solemnized on 
the 24th. 

The chief event in August was the Venetian spectacle at 
Belvedere on the 3d. Miss Nellie Jolliffe's marriage to Ru- 
dolph Spreckels on the 5th came as a sort of a surprise. 



January 4, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Country Club entertniiut) Mr- II I,. Stovonson at n iv 

•n in tier honor Mr- irn party ftl 

wood. M - 'I and Duncan Hnvne were mar 

n the lot li. and the military encamp- 
ment at Del Monte made that charming watering place 
very gay. The last wool. was devoted I 

Monte, where polo, the races, and the "snoot" were the 
attractkn 

Society commenced to flock buck to the city in Septem- 
ber, and weddings were the first items of interest on the 
ramme. Bmss Ermentioe Poole and Louis II. Long 
wedded at the Bun on the 4th: Ella 

Wheaton and the Rev. W. A. Brewer at St. Luke's on the 
11th; Florence Weihc and B. W. Stone at St. Luke's Oil 
the 12th; the marriage of Miss EUa Hobart and Winthrop 
Lester was celebrated in grand style at the Bobart resi- 
dence on the evening of the 10th. A great event of the 
month was the reception on board the flagship Philadel- 
phia on the 18lb, which was a handsome affair. Dinners 
and luncheons were again in order, and two dances were 
given, one by Mrs. L. L. Baker, and a cotillion by Miss 
Theresa Morgan, which Ed. Greenway led with the young 
host 

( October promised earlier in the season to be a month of 
weddings, but a number of them did not take place until 
later in the year. The chief events in that line were the 
ceremonies which united Miss Florence Herrick and Mark 
Requa in Oakland, on the 2d; Miss Mamie Holbrook and 
Sam Knight at Dr. McKenzie's Church on the evening of 
the 8th: Miss Alice MeCutcheon and Ed. Schmieden at 
Grace Church at noon on the Kith, and the red wedding of 
Mrs. Clara Catherwood and Major Darling, at the lady's 
residence, on the 22d. Theatre parties, especially for 
Trilby, were the fad the earlier part of the month. Miss 
Cora Smedburg opened the tea season on the 1st, a num- 
ber of others following soon after, and Miss Emma Butler 
gave the first luncheon party: the other events of the 
month included Lieutenant Potter's tug party, matronized 
by Mrs. Blunt of the Presidio; the first dance of the. Sat- 
urday Night Club at Luut's Hall on the 12th; the Woman's 
Exchange ball at Pioneer Hall on the 31st, and the Hallow- 
e'en party at Fort Mason; Shafter Howard's engagement 
to Miss Mollie Hunter, of Newport, R. I., was announced, 
as well as of Miss Bessie Younger and Burns McDonald. 

The month of November was opened by the Entre Nous 
Club, which gave a dance at Maple Hall on the 1st. Teas, 
dinners, theatre parties, chute parties, etc., kept society 
busy while not occupied with the larger affairs, which in- 
cluded the wedding of Miss Julia Connor and Robert Ben- 
nett at Trinity Church on the 6th; the travesty on the 
"Babes in the "Wood " at the San Francisco Verein Club 
on the 16th; the Friday Fortnightly and Monday Evening 
Club's dances; the Crocker cotillion on the 19th; the char- 
ity concerts at the Pavilion on the 19th and 20th; Miss 
Romie Wallace's debut ball at Armory Hall on the 21st; 
the Dickinson hal puudre at the Occidental on the 26th; the 
Polyclinic fete, and the Breeze-Benson nuptials at Grace 
Church on the 27th; the charity foot-ball game on 
the 28th, and the first dance of the Friday Night Cotillion 
Club at Odd Fellows' Hall on the 29th. The surprise of the 
month was the marriage of Miss Marie Baird and young 
Barry Baldwin. Miss Ella Goad's engagement to Osgood 
Hooker was announced. 

The second annual Horse Show occupied the swim al- 
most to the exclusion of everything else the first week in 
December, opening at the Pavilion on the 2d. Other 
events were theatre parties, the dance of the Entre Nous 
Club, Fred Magee's tug party, teas without end, Miss 
Alice Masten making her debut at one given by her sisters, 
and Miss Alice Boggs at one at her mother's house; the 
' charity bazar, and several hops at the Presidio, the Soro- 
sis Club reception in their new rooms on the 9th; Miss Ho- 
bart's dancing party and the Friday Fortnightly Club 
meeting on the 13th; the dance of the Monday Night Club 
on the 16th, Charley Baldwin's hunt ball at the Palace on 
the 17th, the Christmas cotillion of the Friday Night Club 
on the 20th. While December has not been so full of fes- 
tivity as was November, there was enough going on to 
keep society well occupied. Dinners, of course, have been 
a feature of the holiday week, and the year 1895 may well 
be said to have been one of the pleasantest and gayest 
society has had for a long period of time. 




jfeiZk /M 1 xt"u r e. 

it} fr^qranci! plciifi the ladifs 
A box of thli lobacco mak« a 
moit welcome glRTrlDAY 4lf T 
to riuiband. brother or ' 

^-^CAM DC PROCURCO IN »IL ajIE.1^^^ 

••MARBUHO OP»Oi •■• 
In. .-."i.t. TOBACCO CO JOCCCSJO" 1ftn« 

BALTir-owe- f-\c> 



WINTER GRUISE.S 



TO THE MEDITERRANEAN AND THE ORIENT. 

The Hamburg-American Line's 

TWIN-SCREW EXPRESS S. S. FUERST BISMARCK, 

will leave New York January 2m, 1896, for Madeira, Gibraltar, Algiers, Ge- 
noa, Nice, Tunis. Alexandria (for Cairo and the Pyramids), Jaffa (for 
Jerusalem). Smyrna, Constantinople. Athens, Malta, Messina, Palermo, 
Naples. Genoa. New York, duration about ten weeks. Also, 

WINTER CRUISE TO THE WEST INDIES 
and the Spanish Main. The Hamburg-American Line's TWIN-SCREW 
EXPRESS S. S. COLUMBIA will leave New York January 25, 1896, for 
Port au Prince (Hayti). Ma.yaguez (Porio Rico), St. Thomas, St. Kitts, 
Antigua, Guadaloupe. Martinique. St. Lucia, Barbados, Trinidad, La Gua- 
yara (for Caracas, Venezuela), and Puerto Cabello, Kingston (Jamaica), 
Havana. New York, duration about four and a half weeks, This is the 
first time a Transatlantic liner (about four times as large as an ordinary 
W. I. Liner) with all its comforts is offered on this route. 

NEW ROUTE TO LONDON AND PARIS. 
Twin-Screw Express Steamer Service— NEW YORK to PLYMOUTH 
(London). CHERBOURG (Paris) and HAMBURG. For further particulars 
apply to HAMBURG AMERICAN LINE, 37 Broadway. New York. 
A. W MYER, 401 California St . cor. Sansome, San Francisco. 

The New California Insect Exterminator. Clears out Moths, Fleas, Ants, 
Roaches, Bed-Bugs. Mites on birds, chickens, etc. Contains NO POISON. 

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Sent postpaid to any address on receipt of price in postage stamps . Ener- 
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offered reliable parties. Address all orders and communications to the 
sole manufacturers, 

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328 Seventh St., San Francisco, Cal. 



UP-TO-DATE 

At Moderate Prices. 



Tailoring 



J. H. HAWES, 

Mezzanine B., Crocker Building. (Up one-half flight fronting on Post St.) 



Brandt & 60. 



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139 Montgomery St. 



fl GOOD PRESENT. 

One of DIXON'S '-ATEST STYLE HATS 



Order Cards, $2 SO and $5. 



237 KEARNY, bet. Bush and Sutter. 



Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 



819 Market street 



H 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 




""HE sprite of the New Year sat on his throne, 
The hall from roof to portals 
Was filled with gifts to be bestowed 
On various favored mortals. 

So many, and so rich were they, 

The good sprite felt uneasy 
About his choice. "I'll do my best, 

Dear friends,'' he said, "to please ye." 

He called on his attendant imps, 
And said: "Proceed to sift on 

This mingled mass to find a gift 
To hand to Talbot Clifton. 

' What have you got? Some cobbler's waxj 

" To cease this fiddle-faddle?" 
' Yes, Sire, 'tis just what Talbot needs 

" To keep him on his saddle." 

' Not bad," the sprite approving said, 
'• You've done well, for a starter; 

'What next? What is that ribbon thing?" 
" The Order of the Garter. 

' 'Tis for Jack Parrott's leg; t'will fit 

" Alone his golfiag stocking, 
' A loyal Britisher's best prize — " 

'■ Well, what is that you're rocking?" 

■ A cradle, Sire, the girls say 

" Hobart so long has tarried 
' To take a wife, this gift may lure 

" That young man to get married." 

1 Bring forth that doll — the Prince of Wales, 
" A robe and crown installed in, 

1 And ship him, 'this side up with care,' 
" To his friend, Charley Baldwin." 

' Those two stuffed clubs— for whom are they? 

" Their odor is not pleasant." 
' They are for Polk and Wilson, Sire, 

" A welcome New Year's present." 

' Eight cloven feet, eight forked tails, 

" Eight crimson-tiuted visors, 
' Eight patent sacks with patent clasps, 

" These send the Supervisors." 

" Be careful with that dynamite," 
He cries, as one imp seizes 
The deadly pack — " 'Tis Sutro's gift 
To blow his casts to pieces. 

'• Apollo, and the posing nymphs, 
" Those fake and vile creations, 

■' This useful agent will destroy 
' Our Mayor's abominations. 

" Those massive plates of solid steel, 
" Shaped like a big square platter, 

"Ship off to rich men to write wills, 
" The lawyers cannot shatter. 

" This tangled thing, it is a clue 

" We'll warrant not defective, 
" See that 'tis placed within the hands 

" Of Lees, and the detectives. 

" Behold this pit, all fenced around 

" With froth and airy bubble, 
" We'll pass it to our warring friends, 

" Pere York and Pastor Hubbell." 

This giddy, gaudy skipping Jack, 

So frisky, frosky, frousky 
We'll send with our best compliments 

To Princey Poniatowski. 

This cold deck's for the Union Club, 

And don't omit the Joker, 
The man who gets this patent pack 

Will never lose at poker. 

That all kind fellows, good and true, 
May see the times grow better, 

Receive our compliments to you 

With this New Y'ear's News Letter. 



There is a new game of billiards played in town just 
now at the clubs. It is a combination of Euglish billiards 
and pool. But George Nagle and Warren Payne, of Bo- 
hemian Club fame, have been attempting it. One is put 
under a certain handicap first — say 20(1 or 300 points to 
make. Then you must make a certain score before you 
can begin to count. It's one of the most demoralizing and 
perplexing diversions for the new comer that one could 
find if he were looking for it. 

However, Mr. Payne met a delightful friend in the Occi- 
dental Hotel last week, who introduced to him a fellow 
Spanish- American. This latter plays the trombone in 
our best theatres and concerts; but he is a small crea- 
ture, with a peppery disposition. In fact, he struts like a 
bantam. Payne mistook him for an Italian Count, and 
presently began to forget the musician was only "Profes- 
sor." Half an hour afterwards the 'Count" was intro- 
duced to distinguished company, and was dining' sumptu- 
ously in the warm club dining room. He was as puzzled 
as "ChristQpher Sly " over the eontretrmpt, but Mr. Payne 
and Mr. Nagle, they say, would listen to no explanation. 
They were sure they had known him forever. He had dia- 
monds in his shirt-front and wore a huge emerald ring. 
Would he learn the new game of billiards? 
Why, certainly — for always the politeness sake!— after 
such a beautiful dinner! 

Whereupon several other players were found and the 
game began. At first the "Count" was very stupid, so 
that they lowered his handicap out of charity. But all of 
a sudden the little musician began to play in earnest. The 
balls new round the table, into pockets,^and counting ex- 
traordinary scores. There was money on the game, and 
the tiny Professor, finishing his string with a rush, ex- 
claimed triumphantly: 

"Ah, gentlemen, 1 am so glad to be your guest. Thees 
game I shall always so mooch have love ! Shall we have 
the revenge? " 

But nobody wanted revenge, because Warry Payne, who 
is not bad at the cue, had been filled with despair. As for 
Nagle, he had fainted. Both had believed they were enter- 
taining an "angel unawares." 
* * * 
With the happy New Year conies the swearing off, 

One shuts off his whisky, one eschews cigars, 
One will only tipple when he has a cough, 

One will never, never traffic at the bars; 
One forswears the races, one avoids the club, 

One will each month pass o'er his money to his wife, 
One protests his bibulous companions he must snub, 

All make resolutions to lead a better life. 
But ere the month is over the toper has a jag, 

The man with gloomy features will tell his wife he's broke, 
And the man who shunned tobacco will neither halt or lag 
On his rush to the cigar shop to buy his daily smoke. 



[In Rotterdam I saw a Mty pole— a fair white pole, arounde which 
many did dance. Its top van shining, and could be discerned far awaye. 
All would whirl about it as though mad with joy; but the long, gaudy 
strings which wire attached to it seemid to m', to mike a very foolish, 
unprofitable game. — ExlraC from Sir W. Temple's letter to Lord Arling- 
ton.] 

Once upon a time there was a fairy prince — also he was 
a magician. He lived by the sea, and he maintained an 
orchestra of enchanted seals to gladden his heart. They 
sang to him, and barked for him, and he talked back to 
them in their own language. 

He was filled with pride over his possessions, which were 
great, and was always glad to give everything he had 
away. Only there was a misfortune attached to his gifts. 
For instance, once he presented a beautiful white cat to . 
his friend, President Harrison. It staid with the nation's 
Executive one week, and then crept back. Another time, he 
bought a rubber doll on a corner for a street waif, but, 
when he tossed it to the child, it bounded back into his . 
pocket, which he considered a lucky omen. So magical 
was his touch that a red-hot stove has been known not to 
burn his fingers as he carried it. Sometimes he would in- 
vite the Pharisees to his banquets, and often the Scribes. 
Whenever he wanted to give anything away he would ask 
the Scribes to visit him while he did it. 

A scribe on a daily newspaper would go to his city editor 
and whisper mysteriously: 



January 4. 1896. 



s\\ PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 



'Tlie Prime is going to give the entire city I 

Y.. . dou • mean if" 

sent for me to go to breakfast with him 

and hear all about it! " 

meanal li'.- a capital story. " 

Whereupon the scribe would \i>it the Princely Magician, 
and be as early to the breakfast as he could. But he would 
nd all the other scribes of the Press Club there before 
him. tn his amaiement'and delight. 

Alter which they would be ushered in. the entire com- 
pany, in the dining hall, and before the august presence of 
the Prince himself. Zinfandel would Mow like soup, and 
soup would Mow like water. 

Then, when the merriment was at its height, the Prince 
would rise from his throne, and. holding high a goblel Of 
red wine, would say: 

"My friends. I am about to present our beautiful city of 
San Francisco to the City and County of San Francisco. 1 
have that intention. Of course you will never mention 
this, because my hospitality is SO sacred. Also, my friends, 
I shall give away all my poor seals, together' with my 
stuffed whale. I am a patriot, you see. Besides, 1 mean 
to build that grand library at the Park, where I shall put 
my origiual copy of the Koran, my original copy of the 
Zenda Vesta, and my original autograph copy of all 
Shakespeare's works. They are all genuine, gentlemen, 
and they have expensive bindings on them. But I don't 
want you to talk about that! Promise me you won't! But 
now. to do all this, I am going to part with that which I 
dearly love, next week — those four hundred lots in the 
Richmond district: and I am even forced to sell them at 
auction, in order to provide the ready money for my library 
building! Ah, gentlemen, I don't wonder that you weep 
with me at my sorrow. I appreciate it with sadness and 
joy. But do not mention this auction of my dearest lots. 
It would affect my grief!'' 

Then, after the banquet, the Prince would confide to 
each scribe, privately, that he had been attracted to him 
greatly; that he had heard of his genius and talents; and 
that those qualities were necessary in the chief librarian 
of a great library. Also the Prince would at once take 
the scribe's exact address for future reference. "I 
always have so much liked your style," he would remark, 
parenthetically; "only I 'ox' you, dond'd mendtion this to 
no von." 

At which the scribe would swear by the seals and the 
Richmond district, and all that was holy, that he would 
never disclose the Prince's intention to hint at his future 
librariansbip. Then he would give way to the next scribe, 
who would hang upon the same honeyed hope. 

Then did the scribes return homeward filled with joy. 
Once in the City Editor's room, the dialogue would be 
somewhat as follows: 

City Editor — "What did the old guy want?" 

Scribe (fervently) — "Want? Why, man, he's in trouble! 
He's got to sell all his Richmond lots next week, so he can 
build the new Park Library. It's going to cost a quarter 
of a million dollars, and I have the photographed copy of 
the plans. As soon as the sale is finished the library will 
begin. He's put the library into a trust deed that he's 
going to protect from monopoly and corporations till after 
he's dead." 

Citt Editor — "Give it two columns — but. say, let the 
advertising solicitor look at it first. I went through that 
old song and dance years ago — but then you're young!" 

The scribe collapses, and mourns over the skeptical and 
brutal minded City Editor. 

* * * 

A slap the doughty Willis got, 
Deftly placed, and strong and hot 

Upon his cheek it fell. 
And ever since that bloodless blow 
A clang has echoed to and fro — 

The clang of a brazen bell. 

* * * 

This afternoon, at the Bay District track, the race for 
the great Pommery Sec cup will be held. It will be a 
drawing card undoubtedly. 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. 
Will find it admirable. 



Yon 



Hotel Pieasanton. 




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The - 1 iinily 

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0. M. BRENNAN, Proprietor. 



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Of LONDON. Established 1782. 



Providence-Washington Insurance 



COMPANY. 



Incorporated 1799. 



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Italian Champagne (two brands). 
WHITE (Secco) and RED (Brut.) 

D. P. ROSSI (Doguani) Italia and San Francisco 

1400 Dupont St., Sole agents for the United States and Canada. 

N. B.— This brand is one of the leading champagnes used at the Royal 
Courts of Italy, Germany, England; is specially indorsed by Delmonico, 
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GOODYEflR RUBBER 60., 



R. H. PEASE, Vice-President and Manager. 
577 and 579 Market St., San Fraacisco. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4. 1896. 




AS the New Year opens new hopes spring in the breast, 
new aspirations, new resolves. Life's threads, which 
with some of us have become so tangled, will surely be un- 
ravelled in the New Year. "Fortune favors the brave,' 
we are told, so with brave hearts we gaze hopefully to the 
future. Possibly no class of people are more prone to this 
than our fond parents of society, and to aid their vision of 
the opening year we append a list of oureligibles as natur- 
ally the object of most interest to those of them who have 
daughters, for as time rolls on there are many sweet blos- 
soms remaining unplucked from the parental stem. 

First on the list, unquestionably, in point of millions, 
stands young Walter Hobart, who is in possession of the 
wealth left him by his father. Mr. Hobart has youth, good 
looks, and a nice disposition in addition to his money, but, 
unfortunately for the pretty buds — so far at least as can 
be judged — up to the present his attentions have been 
more devoted to horses than young ladies. However, if 
dame gossip speaks truly, the new year will see a change. 
James D. Phelan, also a millionaire in his own right, is a 
much older man than Hobart, and therefore more ex- 
perienced in the wiles of the /"•»» sexe. Of stout build and 
medium height, Mr. Phelan is an attractive figure and 
scrupulously neat in attire. Of cultivated taste, a patron 
of the Fine Arts, and an agreeable conversationalist, a 
man of irreproachable character and habits, he would in- 
deed be a prize for any woman. 

Richard, familiarly styled "Dick" Tobin, while not so 
rich as either of the above gentlemen, is yet a parti worth 
capturing by the buds on fortune bent. He is one of the 
heirs to the large estate left by his father, and spends it 
right royally, they say. 

Walter L. Dean is another son of a wealthy sire, but his 
father being very much alive, his fortune, to any extent, is 
in the prospective stage. Walter Dean, however, pos- 
sesses other attractions of good looks and good breeding 
which make him very popular in society, and the income 
allowed him by his father would more than satisfy the 
wants of the average aspirant for its sharing, but like Jim 
Phelan, he seems very difficult to capture, though many 
nets have been woven for that purpose. 

Charles A. Baldwin, only son of the late wealthy mem- 
ber of the mercantile house of C. Adolph Low & Co., is a 
young man held in much favor as a marriageable possibil- 
ity by mammas and daughters alike. Not only is Charley 
rich, but his good looks none can dispute, his almond 
shaped eyes doing a vast amount of destruction when he 
chooses to use them. 

Ed Donahoe, the youngest son of the late pioneer banker, 
is a tall, broad shouldered young fellow of fine manly ap- 
pearance, but, the girls say, very hard to get at, as since 
the death of his father he "has devoted himself assiduously 
to his mother's society. So the girl who "goes in" for 
young Ed's conquest must do it through the maternal. 

George Newhall is another young man of muscular build, 
and the only bachelor left in a family of brothers. The 
girls say the records made by his married brothers is a 
great thing in George's favor, and soft eyes glance -very 
sweetly in his direction at all the functions of society. 

Dr. Harry Tevis, eldest son of our leading capitalist, and, 
like George Newhall, the only one left of the Tevis boys for 
the selection of our matrimonially inclined young ladies, is 
one of the most eligible of the list of beaux so ranked. Dr. 
Tevis is a handsome young fellow of large build, blonde hair 
and moustache, and blue eyes. He is devoted to music and 
very artistic in temperament, being skilled in the decor- 



ative line. Various are the reasons assigned in the swim 
for the difficulty of Dr. Tevis's capture. One says he is a 
general admirer; another that he prefers married women 
to flirt with, and yet another that he has left his heart in 
New York. She who gets him will be a fortunate woman. 
W. B. Page, the last of the Page brothers left single, 
will no doubt make as exemplary a Benedict as they each 
and all do, it being a saying among their friends that no 
matter how gay they are as bachelors, matrimony steadies 
them like a rock. Will Page is the possessor of a fortune 
also, his twenty-fifth birthday having seen the distribution 
of the large estate left by his father, the late Dr. Page, of 
Valparaiso. 

Robbie Eyre, another remaining sprig from a full branch, 
is now in a position to marry any reasonably minded young 
woman, having been left a legacy by a lately deceased 
friend which will make a desirable addition to the allow- 
ance given him by his father. 

"The Boardman boys," as the girls style them, are all 
eligible for matrimony. Tall, slender, gentlemanly young 
men all of them, and two especially gifted with the genial 
uature so marked a feature of their father. They are four 
in number, so the girls can take their choice, though Mr. 
Chauncey Boardman seems the chief favorite. 

Joe Grant must be included in a list of our eligible 
men, although, being a widower, he is not among the 
younger beaux. Mr. Grant is the only child of his father, 
Adam Grant, the well-known dry goods importer. He 
is what the world calls "well fixed" financially, and no 
doubt his previous expei-ience in matrimony will render 
him doubly to be desired as a husband by our belles. 

J. W. Byrne, like Callingham, his brother, is a man any 
woman might be proud to captivate. Tall, fine looking, 
and thoroughly a man of the world, he (again like his 
brother) will be a fish requiring skillful angling to land. 

Allan St. John Bowie is also of this type, a young man of 
much refinement of taste, good breediug, and thejr ne sais 
,iin,i' which belongs to good birth. Handsome and wealthy, 
no wonder the women all rave over him, but he, too, seems 
difficult of capture. 

Harry Babcock, the youngest son of a California pioneer, 
has inherited a goodly share of his father's wealth, and is, 
moreover, a very agreeable beau. His tastes incline to 
polo and golf, in the latter of which he is an enthusiast, so 
the girl to capture this swain must be interested in out-of- 
door sports. 

The Martin boys, Peter and Andrew, are fortunate in 
being sons of a very rich mother, consequently they receive 
a large share of smiles and attention from the girls. 

Harry Simpkins is a great favorite; rich, jolly, and gen- 
erous, good-looking and young, he can take his pick from 
our garden of girls. 

Harry Holbrook is also one of fortune's favorites. The 
son of a rich father, popular in society, and sure to make 
a delightful head of a house when he establishes one. 

A most highly "eligible" is Col. Fred Crocker, who, 
although a widower with several children, is so charming 
and so rich any woman would gladly consent to tread life's 
pathway as his companion. 

Claude Terry Hamilton is a decided eligible, for although 
not a man of millions, he is more than "well off," and is 
also a very attractive man personally. The girls have 
been anxious to win his favor for many a day. 

For those of our belles who would hke to be "au old 
man's darling" rather than a young man's slave, there are 
several elderly beaux to choose from. Tom Madden, George 
Marye, and Winfield Jones have ornamented society since 
our own grandmothers' days, but they are such dyed in the 
wool old bachelors they are almost to be regarded as hope- 
less, although eligible. 

As a matter of course, there are many of our popular 
beaux who do not appear in this list because their claim to 
the title of being an eligible parti cannot be said to be 
sufficiently established to place them there. 



1896. 



SAX FRANCISCO M.WS LETTER. 





»t ihcdcTll art ih. 
that vlll pl.r ibtr derll. air. with ton." 

Ire of licking the boots 
1 orld, we will soon have to 
r they are turning out 
an uncommonly common set of people. A' 
that is our luck in this city. Ever; time one of them 
■•■<• get on our store clothes ami lubricate 
our t. d lH'j_'iii licking tlieir boots, and thanking 

• nt' among us for a 
time. But ire are mightily out of luck or 

thing, for the more we get t<> know them the more 
they - very like the commonest sort of our own 

If we are wrong we hope our contemporaries will 
take up their defense and point out a few instances where- 
in they are half as good as any good sort of American. 
WE are averse to misjudging a whole section of the 
English people, and that, too. theone which considers 
about the very best: but if we pass any judgment at 
all upon the English aristocracy from what we see here, 
and it should turn out that our judgment couldn't be ap- 
pealed from, it's going to be mighty bad for all the future 
visitors of that titled gang. They are so nervous and fear- 
ful that they will not be taken for aristocrats, that they 
generally act iu such a way that they are in no way likely 
to be mistaken for gentlemen. The last feat recorded, 
entitling either to public notice, is that one of them kicked 
his whilom secretary out of a public bath house into a pub- 
lic street. That may have proved he was a noble lord, but 
it did not tend to prove that he was a gentleman. We 
probably have an altogether wrong idea of what a lord 
ought to be. We are fast learning what the specimens of 
European aristocracy are, and if these are fair samples of 
the goods, we incline to the opinion that we don't care to 
invest in titles or the titled nobility at any price. And we 
are likely to remain of the opiniou that there's nothing 
much better made of the human kind than an American 
gentleman — as little as he resembles an English lord, and 
— perhaps because he does so little resemble him. 

JUST now they are not faring much better with the 
English aristocracy in New York than we are here. 
The Earl of Dunraven, some time ago, by a communication 
in reference to the yacht race made prominent some per- 
sonal characteristics, which are in this country held to be 
the exclusive characteristics of blackguards. He has re- 
cently crossed the Atlantic, unfortified with evidence to 
sustain his bluster against the fairness of the defeat of his 
yacht, and thereby displayed the temerity and indiscretion 
of an ass. In the interval between the meetings of the 
committee of gentlemen appointed to hear and determine 
the whole matter, and before the whole evidence of the re- 
spondents was in, seeing that he was overwhelmingly 
beaten, he escaped with his counsel and soon put the roll- 
ing ocean between him and America. We shall be mis- 
taken if, by any estimable silence, he leaves us a chance 
to think him a gentleman in any sense, and if he does not, 
by some utterance in which he will display the character- 
istics aforesaid, soon put himself out of the category of 
persons worthy of consideration in any polite society. 

THERE is not now, and never will be, anything like be- 
ing completely "swell. " If we are not of the swell 
set we are nowhere, for verily there is only the swell set, 
and the rest are simply not to be mentioned. Some of us 
think that we are decidedly provincial here, and have a 
good deal to learn before we can hold a candie to those who 
know how to do the correct thing. But of course we shall 
be told that we are simply weak and uninformed. For 
there is a small crowd of us, who have been East and 
across the ocean blue, and have taken it all in through the 
pores, and consequently know it all. Of course, we are 
now alluding to our high society, the dudes par excellence, 
the fellows who are in it for all they are worth. For in- 
stance, the Horse Show, you know, and how we did it. 
But, by Jove, there has unfortunately been "a chiel among 
us takin' notes," and faith, he has "prented it." If we 



ot \\ in. he has dared to su that Ho 
cause he bad half - 

riicn 
...ion monogram over the hips on the breeching 
This ol 
the ^ ! et hang their heads, for if Hobart di 

know hon to dress a horse, in heaven's name, who 
Hut. thank thai aven, his coachmen wore hats 

shaped, with not too much bell," and that was anti- 
dote to the bitter bane 1'arrott was altogether wrong. 

as Tn 
leaving off breeching and using a kieking-strap. 
Heavens I mind you, that was just mis- 

takes. Hut all this .-.inns so sad thai we have to 
writing of the resi till another paragraph. 



T 



HERE was enough fault found with the rest of our 
great Horse Show to make our whole Dudedom sick 

through and through. Why, Hobart's horses were s i in 

public with "elbow bits instead of the Buxton!" Can Ho- 
barl and his horses hold up their brads after that? Then, 
while "his coach was up to park form," he lost his stand 
ing by having "an extra brake on behind to be worked by 
his servant." Simple soul, not to know that a good "whip 
can readily call upon his servants to put on the skid pro- 
vided for the purpose in the event of the brake not hold- 
ing." It is so foolish to avoid breaking your neck and that 
of your wife or sweetheart, unless you do it iu the correct 
way ! 

fjl R. E. Duplessis Beylard received a little gratuitous 
i \. advertising of bis qualities as a whip at the Horse 
Show when Mr. Samuel Walter Taylor got down to work 
on his article about that famous society event. Mr. Ex- 
quisite Duplessis Beylara did not drive his own team be- 
cause he didn't own one, and, if it depends upon his capac- 
ity to make money enough to buy one he probably never 
will. But he hasn't lived as a petted darling in the arms 
of luxury furnished by other people all these years, with- 
out escaping any special humiliation in driving other peo- 
ple's horses at a show, Mr. Exquis etc., etc., Beylard 

on this occasion helped Mr. Hobart win a third prize by 
driving "Mr. Hobart's team of browns." It must have 
been the "browns" that took the prize by reason of their 
own special virtues, for Mr. Taylor intimates that Mr. Ex- 
quis etc., etc., Beylard had on exhibition so many of 

his own faults that Hobart got only the third prize. For, 
says Mr. Taylor, who knows it all, his "driver made all the 
mistakes of the first prize winner," "none of the drivers 
were in proper costume," including, of course, Mr. Bey- 
lard, and then, "he was additionally at fault in being 
without bearing reins." If Mr. Beylard don't go and hide 
his head after that it is because it is so swollen that he 
can't find a hole big enough to hide it in. And yet Mr. 

Exquis etc., etc., Beylard thinks himself rather a fine 

whip. And he was so happy driving Hobart's browns in 
society that it is an infernal shame to hurt his vanity or 
intimate that possibly he doesn't know it all. 

IT would have been very simple in us to suggest that 
when Charley Baldwin was driving the B'lingum club 
coach there was any defect in his attire, because, why is 
he Charley Baldwin at all, if a newspaper critic on the 
Pacific coast can give him points. And yet, the New York 
critic of that famous horse show, that has now gone into 
history with all its virtues and vanities, has dared to say 
that he "committed the unpardonable faux lias (and put 
it in French, too) of appearing on the box in full evening- 
dress." Why, didn't this gentleman manage a Hunt Ball 
a little while ago, and wasn't it the correct thiug for his 
chief parasites to appear in scarlet coats? And wasn't it 
quite English, you know, so far as it went? And the mere 
matter of forgetting about the knee breeches didn't make 
it much, if any, less awfully swell. But this little matter 
of faux pas iu costume has got into a New York journal, 
and must now be known across the water! There seems 
to be here cause for offense, but of course we can't offer 
any advice about how to settle it. And yet if Mr. Baldwin 
can get acquainted with Mr. Willis Polk, he can probably 
learn how to obtain the satisfaction due to a gentlemau, 
and possibly be able to borrow his three plumbers as a 
body-guard. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




January 4, 1896. 




3y WWjaugUtz 



A RETROSPECT of the sport happenings of the year 
that has passed away gives rise to the suspicion 
that the people of San Francisco comprise a fickle com- 
munity. There may be those who will consider this opinion 
as something in the nature of a mild libel on the dwellers 
by the Golden Gate, and to them I would say: "What has 
become of trotting and baseball — the two branches of the 
many in the domain of pastime which are wholly and solely 
American, both in origin and development ? " 

There is no gainsaying the fact that they have, for the 
time being at any rate, been shouldered into a condition 
bordering on inocuous desuetude by newer and more excit- 
ing forms of sport, for the thoroughbred has ousted the 
trotter from public favor, and the chrysanthemum-locked 
footballer has usurped the place of the dabbler in base hits 
and home ruDS. 

It may be that the good people of this city are only fol- 
lowing the dictates of fashion in matters sporting, just as 
they do in dress and in the style of their indoor entertain- 
ments, and that trotting and baseball will come in vogue 
again just as surely as will square-toed shoes and square 
dances, but the records of '95 plainly indicate that the 
time of reaction is not yet. 

There is, undoubtedly, something more inspiriting and 
more blood quickening in the sight and sound of a squadron 
of thoroughbreds sweeping along than in gazing at a hand- 
ful of horses driven to harness at a uniform and monotonous 
gait. So, too, while slides to base and three-baggers are 
eminently exciting in their way, they seem to loose their 
power to enthuse when stacked up against the spine- jarring 
tackle, the mad rush around the end, and the Donnybrook- 
like spectacle of a score of squirming footballers all 
tangled up like worms in a bait box. 

These comparisons are drawn mainly to support the sug- 
gestion that it will be pretty hard to oust the running- 
track and the gridiron field from the affections of the mul- 
titude. The forms of sport which obtain thereon have the 
genuine tabasco relish of excitement to them, and the pub- 
lic palate is more likely to yearn for a still more pungent 
condiment than to content itself with the moderately- 
seasoned home-made dishes of the old days. 

There is yet another Richmond in the field in the matter 
of sporting novelties, and that is 'cycling. It has proven 
more contagious than the grippe, and its effects on old- 
established lines of sport are very marked. It has absorbed 
the flower of the local athletic clubs, and to its baneful 
influence, as much as to the lack of public patronage and 
encouragement, may be traced the fact that the beautiful 
little Olympic Park, on the road to the beach, is as neg- 
lected and forlorn-looking as Goldsmith's deserted village, 
and the further fact that the outdoor men of the Olympic, 
Acme, and Reliance have discarded their spiked shoes for 
pedaling pumps, and are more wrapped up in flying starts 
and Class B qualifications than they are in improving exist- 
ing records on the cinder path. 

Wheeling has also drawn into its maelstrom those who 
were wont to grace the grand stands and bleachers at 
field days and baseball games, and a trip out through the 
Park roadways on any fine Sunday in the season, which 
has just closed, would suggest that an athletic tourney 
scheduled for that particular day would, in all likelihood, go 
short of patronage. Why? Because everybody seemed to fce 
awheel. 

The pastime of cycling increased over two fold during 
'95. New clubs, ranging in membership from 10 to 150, 
were formed all over San Francisco, and many fine club 



houses sprung into existence. The Olympics, Acmes, and 
the Reliance have paid particular attention to the sport, 
and the local men have done their share of establishing 
world's records. Foster's half-mile at Napa (48 sees.) was 
the best performance of the year, and his mile (1.46 3-5) 
will stand a lot of hammering. McFarland, too, has con- 
stituted himself a mark for the wheelmen of the world, by 
trundling off two-thirds of a mile in 1.25 1-5 at San Jose. 

While field days have been phenomenally scarce in and 
around San Francisco, and events seem to denote that the 
amateur runners, jumpers, and shot-putters have diverted 
their surplus energies to football and wheeling operations, 
the triumphant tour of the University of California athletes 
through the East plainly indicates that there is no lack of 
high-class amateur talent at this end. The Berkeley boys 
who sported the blue and gold across the Rockies during 
the summer, met and defeated Princeton, tied the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, rated fourth in the American cham- 
pionship, defeated Union College, the University of Illinois, 
and the Denver Athletic Club, won the western champion- 
ship at Chicago, and were beaten in individual contest by 
the cracks of the Chicago Club alone. This, in my opinion, 
is a record that California may well be proud of. 

In summing up the sports of the year it may be said that 
thoroughbred horse-racing, football, and cycling have ad- 
vanced wonderfully in public favor, while trotting, base- 
ball, and field athletics have retrograded. The Olympic 
Club has succeeded in keeping alive a flicker of interest in 
amateur baseball by maintaining a crackajack, all-conquer- 
ing team, but professional baseball is moribund, to all in- 
tents and purposes. 

There has been a slight boom in rowing — also owing, 
mainly, to the development of a ca,pable junior crew by the 
Olympic Club — and yachting showed greater signs of act- 
ivity than it did in 1894. 

Trap-shooting at live birds, while not losing any of its im- 
mediate votaries, has got to be a pastime from which the gen- 
eral public seems to keep aloof, while the disc cracking in- 
dustry has come into prominence with a bound, the saucer 
smashers now outnumbering the pigeon-maimers ten to 
one. Tennis has been, if anything, quieter than in preced- 
ing years, cricket has not'broken through its British en- 
vironments to any palpable extent, and golf and polo are 
still as exclusively fashionable as are pink teas and Friday 
Night Cotillions. 



TO AMBROSE BIERCE. 



When you praised Robertson you did not know 
You praised a greater than yourself, and so 
Now you take back the words of praise you gave, 
Since they made not your chosen friend, your slave! 

Lee Faibchild. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 



For sale by all first-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 



W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



January 4. 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




FOR some Umi pasl lave bad their crest or 

poo their bicycle, a> they would 
gbam, bul a development of the idea has 
taken place which is hardly in good taste. It consists ol 
having the owner's name, and very often address, painted 
upon the frame of the machine. Certainly it enabli 
rider to identify her bicycle, but moat riders require no 
tance in picking out their machine from a dozen 
j, a- the " personality " of every bicycle is quit 
tinet. No one would have a name and address painted on 

the door Of a carriag ■ he wished to evade the 

vehicle tax. 

The splendid cycle trophy which the California Asso- 
ciated Cycling Clubs have, been presented , with by 




?\ #"\ 'jpi- 



Bicycle Cup. 



Baker & Hamilton, is a graceful solid silver cup, over a 
yard high. It cost five hundred dollars, at the least, and 
is the most sumptuous prize ever offered. The Club win- 
ning it three years in succession owns it forever. Thursday 
an exhibition tour of the Coast will begin when this famous 
cup will be exhibited, and every Bicycle Club this side of 
the Rockies shall see it.* 

Nearly every army has now a bicycle corps. In Ger- 
many six men of every regiment are mounted on wheels to 
act as scouts. 



December is the prime time for oysters, and no one is equal to 
Moraghan, of the California Market, when the freshest native or im- 
ported are concerned. 



THE 

MOUNT 
FOR 

96 

THE WHIT E RWED PI MMER IS THE C OMER 

HOOKER & CO. 

Retail Store-No. 1640 Market Vtreet. 
Cyclery—Cor. Page and Stanyan Streets. 
Wholesale Dep't- 16-18 Drumm Street, S. F. 

COAST AGENTS FOR 



ARNE 
I CYCLE 



MOTOR CYCLES. 



When the time comes for motor cycles, 
we will have them. 

At the present lime there is no more up- 
to-date way of gettiDg over the ground 
than on a 



TRIBUNE or WINTON 
BIGYGLE. 



BAKER & HAMILTON, Coast Agents. 

Kenney & Payton, 517 Valencia St. 

C. M ChristotTer, 419 Stanyan St., Looal Agents. 



Send for catalogue . 




'96 MGGune 



Send for Catalogue. 



Are right up to date. 
Dcn't fail to see them, 

ARMES & DALLAM, 

Coast Agents. 
230-332 Front St., San Francisco 



Does your 



Root Need Repair? 

We will examine it without cost, and give 
estimate for putting in good order, and 
keeping it so for a term of years. 

PnraffiriA Paint On Roofing Departmen 
raraTTine rami UO. n6 Battery street. 



P0DE>STfl & BAUD06GHI, 



FLORISTS and DECORATORS. 



BAY VIEW NURSERY, 242 Sutter St , 

Between Kearny and Grant Avenue, San Francisco. Cal. 

Telephone Main 760. 



A. F. JOHNS X GO., 

Financial Agents. 

Dealers in Bonds and Securities. 
32 Market street, room 9. 



MONEY LOANED. 
San Francisco, Cal. 







REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 




A Book la our last issue we pointed out that Richard 

of the Henry Stoddard, in the N. Y. Mail and Express, 
Week.* says that "The Letters of Matthew Arnold are 
disappointing because they tell so much of the 
home life of the great writer and so little of interest to the 
general public. Mr. Stoddard is one of the ablest Amer- 
ican critics, but we fail to see his reasons for this state- 
ment. True, Matthew Arnold's Letters contain much 
that has little interest outside the family circle, but then 
look at his criticisms of Tennyson, Herbert Spencer, 
Froude, Browning, Ruskin, Disraeli, Palmerston, Words- 
worth, and many other great ones in literature, and, in 
face of all this, we question the accuracy of Mr. Stoddard's 
conclusions. On the contrary, we believe that there have 
not been many published letters of great litterateurs, 
except those of Grey, Cowper, Lord Byron and Keats, 
that have so much interest for the general reader as those 
of Matthew Arnold, and while there is much that can be 
passed over without loss, there is also much that is valu- 
able to the student and the bookworm." 

We now find that our position on this question has been 
challenged in certain places, and we are, therefore, 
obliged to explain our views. We cheerfully admit Mr. 
Stoddard's superiority as a critic, but we deny his in- 
fallibility. We believe we quoted him correctly, at least 
we hope so, and we think we can prove that the letters of 
Matthew Arnold are crowded with expressions of opinions 
on other great people, which cannot but have a living in- 
terest to the literary world at large. Look, for instance, 
at what he says about Napoleon. Here it is: 

"I have also been reading Las Casas, and his (Napol- 
eon's) energy and precision in arranging details never 
struck me so much as now." 

True, the Napoleonic memoirs published lately do not 
sustain this estimate Las Casas placed on Napoleon's ac- 
curacy in detail, yet is not the opinion of Matthew Arnold 
on this subject of interest to us all? 

Again, see what he says about Ernest Renan: "I thought 
I would tell you of a Frenchman whom I saw in Paris the 
other day, Ernest Renan, between whose line of endeavor 
and my own I imagine there is considerable resemblance, 
that you might have a look at some of his books if you 
liked. The difference is, perhaps, that he tends to incul- 
cate morality, m a high sense of the word, upon the French 
nation as what they most want, while I tend to inculcate 
intelligence, also in a high sense, upon the English nation, 
as what they most want; but with respect both to moral- 
ity and intelligence, I thiuk we are smgularly at one in our 
ideas, and also with respect to the progress and the estab- 
lished religion of the day." 

Or take his estimate of Tennyson and Browning, which 
is as follows: ''I have less poetic sentiment than Tennyson 
and less intellectual vigor and abundance than Browning; 
yet, because I have, perhaps, more of a fusion of the two 
than either of them, and have more regularly applied that 
fusion to the main line of modern development, I am likely 
enough to have my turn as they have had theirs." 

This may be considered daring, but it was too daring for 
Arnold, was in some respects more striking as a poet, than 
either Browning or Tennyson, and his "Stanzas from the 
Grand Chartreuse" contains elements of loftiness which 
we fail to find surpassed in either of his two great rivals. 
But look again at his long criticism on Tennyson's "Idylls 
of the Kings," in which he says that Tennyson, "with all 
his temperament and artistic skill, isdeficient in intellectual 
power; and no modern poet can make very much of his 
business unless he is pre-eminently strong in this." 

Who can tell us that even these few quotations do not 
compensate for the mass of uninteresting matter which 
the letters contain. But let us read on, and hear him tell 
us that he could " never like Ruskin " and that he regarded 
Swinburne as a " pseudo-Shelley," while he says of Burke: 
"What makes Burke stand so splendidly among politicians 
is that he treats politics with his thought and imagination, 



and, therefore, whether one agrees with him or not, he al- 
ways interests you, stimulates you, and does you good." 

And of politicians, what can be more interesting than his 
views of Pitt, Walpole, and Peel, as writing of Lord Pal- 
merston he says: " I do not deny his personal qualities, 
but, as to calling him a great minister like Pitt, Walpole, 
or Peel, and talking of his death as a great national calam- 
ity, why, taking his career from 1830, when his importance 
really begins, to the present time, he found his country the 
first power in the world's estimation, and he leaves it the 
third; of this no person with eyes to see, or ears to hear, 
and opportunities for using them, can doubt." We may 
not agree with Matthew Arnold in all this, but who will 
say that the letters that contain such opinions are not of 
living interest to the student and the litterateur ? Why, 
his opinion of Wordsworth alone is worth the trouble of 
reading his letters, for he says: " He can show a body of 
work superior to what any other English poet, except 
Shakespeare and Milton, can show, and his body of work 
is more interesting than Milton's, though not so great. 

* * * Wordsworth's body of work, to keep to that 
phrase, is superior to the body of work of any continental 
poet of the last hundred years, except Goethe; superior to 
that of Schiller, Heine, Musset, Victor Hugo." 

And then of Burns he says: "Burns is a beast, with 
splendid gleams, and the medium in which he lived, Scotch 
peasants, Scotch Presbyterianism, and Scotch drink, is 
repulsive." Of course, to a refined intellect, such as 
Arnold possessed, it was to be expected that Burns could 
not be acceptable, but the world has been more charitable 
to the Scotch poet than Arnold, and it is better that it 
should be so. But we must stop, and yet we could quote 
much- more if we had the space at our disposal, to prove 
that the position we have taken on Matthew Arnold's Let- 
ters and Mr. Stoddard's criticism, is justified by facts, and 
we express the hope that we have, in this brief review, 
sustained that position to the letter. Nor must it be for- 
gotten that if Matthew Arnold was, in his letters, severe 
on the Americans as a people, he was also severe on the 
English, and, in view of his unquestioned honesty, we can 
overlook many of his unkind remarks. But, take those 
letters all in all, they appear to us to be full of interest, 
and this opinion, we believe, is shared by the majority of 
people who have read them. 
*"The Letters of Matthew Arnold." 

Seventy years ago it was generally believed that what 
is now the State of Wisconsin was destiued to be forever 
an Indian reserve. This project was proposed by Morse, 
. who was then the best of American geographers, and it 
was supported by Calhoun, who was then Secretary of 
War. Wisconsin was then considered so far off that Morse 
told the Indians that they would never be disturbed, be- 
cause the white man would not dream of going so far into 
the wilderness. Until 1832, it was believed that the ter- 
ritory was too far north for successful agriculture, and 
now that State numbers nearly 2,000,0110 souls. All this, 
and much more, we are told in detail in " Unnamed Wis- 
consin," a book that cannot be of great interest to the 
residents of Wisconsin. It is a pity, however, that a 
book so full of research should also be full of errors. 
There are printers' errors, proof-readers' errors, and 
errors about the explorers and missionaries of old. But 
the book is so good that we can overlook its mistakes, even 
when they blur the pages with information that is not ac 
I curate. 

"In the Redwoods," by Fannie De C. Miller, is neatly 
printed and well illustrated. It is a poem of some twenty 
verses, and it is, we presume, the author's first appear- 
ance in type. If so, we hope she will try again. 

Who is George Harton that has written a poem called 
" In Unknown Seas"? Whoever he is he should seriously 
ponder on the instability of the Muse. Here, for instance, 
is how he describes California : 

" Vine land and pine land afar by the West, 
Wine land and shine land, by all blessings blest; 
Benign land, divine land, that God loveth best!" 
Just think of describing California as "shine land," as if 
this State were made up of colonies of foreign boot-blacks. 
Crude, defective, and mediocre is our verdict of this poem, 
and we venture to believe that we shall not be alone in our 



January 4, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



An inten n^ on in the columns 

of Tie tbeeducatl ml of the 1 

peasant, before and after ition. Th< 

Pthing Mr - U'cyman said in "The 

tout the ignorance of the French peasant 
ment The Nation denies. Mr, YVeyman 
■;ds that the French peasant of pre-revolutionary 
was more illiterate than the French peasant ol i- 11 " 
or after, and we all know that Mr. W'eyman is an author- 
ity mi tl But if the author of "The Red 
Cooknde" knows ;i about pre-revolutionary 
Prance, so docs the Abiv Maggiolo, ami. of the two. we 
would accept the testimony of the ecclesiastic before that 
of the novelist, because the churchman has given proof 
that there were fewer schools in France immediately after 
the revolution than there were before it. and this is some- 
thing the novelist omits. We have no span' at our dis- 
posal to go into details, but anyone who is interested in the 
subject can get further information in the Revue ./< /" Rio- 
olution, vol. 4. p. 117. 

And so here comes "The Marvelous Adventures of Sir 
John Maundeviile. Kt ." again. How they bring us back to 
our boyhood days, the days when Baron Munchausen, 
Ferdinand Mundy Pinto, and Robinson Crusoe held sway, 
and when the mind was aflame with the wonderful and the 
strange. Of course, the good Knight has always been 
doubted, and his travels have, more or less, been regarded 
as a myth. but. whether true or false, itiscertaiu that his 
book is a classic, and, with the excepiiou of the Bible, no 
book has been more extensively translated. But Maunde- 
viile occupies the same relation to English literature that 
Chaucer does to its poetry, and they were, too, contemp- 
oraries. 

Mr. Stead, the editor of the Review of Reviews, has de- 
termined to issue a number of the best works of the best 
authors in a condensed form. He will not "boil down" the 
books, but he will give the best chapters and the most 
famous scenes of each book. He is to do this because he 
is convinced that an ignorant public will not read a book 
at length, and so he will produce the best works of the 
best authors in a somewhat similar form to his Review of 
Reviews. Some time ago, when Miss Braddon attempted 
to "abridge" the works of Scott, there was a great hub- 
bub, and the literary world will wonder if Mr. Stead can 
be more successful than she promised to be. 

"Love and Laughter," a collection of posthumous verse 
by the late Mr. James G. Burnett, is not without poems of 
merit. Here and there we find evidence of some force and 
poetic conception, but to say that Mr. Burnett belonged to 
the same class of poets as Hood and Praed, as some critics 
claim, is, to our mind, to say far too much. Hood and 
Praed were finished artists, while Mr. Burnett was a mere 
amateur, and he is no more to be classed with Hood or 
Praed than starlight is to be compared with sunlight. 
That Mr. Burnett may have had the material for good 
work we have no right to question, but he was nothing but 
a fairly good versifier to the end of his life. 

"The significance of the gradations of curvature or ang- 
ularity through which outlines are made to describe shapes 
cannot be fully understood except in connection with the 
next way in which they have been said to be made repre- 
sentative — namely, regularity. This is a resul r. primarily 
of like effects produced by measurements, just as in poetry 
and music it is a result of like effects produced by 
measures. All outlines surround both spaces and shapes. 
These like effects may be produced by resemblances either 
in one or in the other." 

"The Golden Rock " is a story of adventure and explor- 
ation in South Africa. Its episodes are improbable and 
amazing, and there is a lack of coherency about the book 
that makes it of little value and of small interest. In fact, 
the book is amateurish, weak, and full of explatives. 
"Thank God" and "Thank Heaven" are too liberally 
interpolated in the dialogue, and, besides, we fail to see 
what connection there is between a torpedo-catcher and 
South African exploration, and the story does not answer 
the query. 

Now, gentle reader, do you blame us for throwing away 
the book in despair. 



leer after knowledge we last week took up a 

l»K>k nailed "Painting, Sculpture, and Archlti 
Representative Arts, and, after reading about one-third 

of it. we threw it down in despair. it was too mueh for 

our limited comprehension, ami we could not understand it. 
We had a headache from the heroic effort we made 1 
ravel some of the sentences, and. unless we stopped, we 

feared our Library Table would go nil "ii a spirit dam.' of 

its own. But, for fear of being charged with a lack of per- 
spicacity, may we ask some of our readers to " lido 
riddle me" the following extract from this 1 

Books are to disappear; men of letters are not to be 
called writers, hut narrators: the taste for literary style 

is to die out, libraries are to be transformed into phono 
graphtics, in all newspaper offices there will be speaking 

halls, where the editors will record in a clear voice the 
news received bj telephonic despatch, and the phonograph 
will enter into the daily life of the people, and will form 
part of the stock of every public place, hotel, restaurant, 
and so on. So says a French scientist. 

Mr. Robert Buchanan is a Scotch poet and novelist of 
somewhat melodramatic tendencies. He is uneven in ex- 
cellence — an able delineator of character, but his descrip- 
tive passages are often overwrought and wordy. His 
book "Lady Rilpatrick " is, however, to be admired for 
the temerity it shows in placing " virtue triumphant, vice 
vanquished " before us, and the book comes as a restful 
change after a surfeit of emotional literature. 

"Early Knowledge of Electricity" is a book that is likely 
to find interesting readers throughout the world. The 
author, Mr. Park Benjamin, Ph. D., L.L.B., has given us 
a book that is full of information, much of which, although 
old, is put before the world in a new and a highly interest- 
ing form. The book is of interest to the layman as well as 
to the scientist, and it cannot fail to command attention. 



One of the finest stocks of imported goods to be found in the city 
is now kept at J. M. Litchfield's, the merchant and fashionable 
military tailor. He is fully prepared to furnish customers with the 
finest quality of goods and the most perfect fitting clothing. He is 
always prepared with the latest styles in garments, and his long ex- 
perience and promptness in business has made him popular among 
customers. His place of business is at 12 Post street, where he is 
always prepared to take orders. 

Both comfort and health ma} r be secured by the wise selection of 
underwear, and the splendid stock carried by John W, Carraany, 
25 Kearny street, affords every opportunity for a wise choice. 



Winchester 

Repeating Shot Guns 

Winchester 

Repeating Rifles 

Wlnctiester 

Single Shot Rifles 

Winchester 

Ammunition for all rifles 
and revolvers 

Sold by all dealers — ^- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Januaty 4, 1896. 




JT seems rather a pity, 
for the sake of the uni- 
formity of things, that in these days of Anglo-mania a 
more extended knowledge of the standing of titled Brit- 
ishers does not obtain among the writers for the daily press 
of our city. Apparently these scribblers find it impossible 
to place the grades of English aristocracy. They insist 
upon "my lord"-ing Talbot Clifton, and the latest exhibi- 
tion of ignorance is the bestowal of nobility upon a Scotch 
"Sir," who, as a baronet, is not entitled to be so ranked. 
How amused these foreign tourists must be at getting 
brevet rank, so to speak, in our republican land. 

* * * 

Harry Dimond presided over the "low jinks" at the 
Bohemian Club Saturday night. The jinks were an im- 
mense success, but the only skeleton at the feast was the 
fact that so few members did anything to amuse, and so 
many invited guests did the entertaining. The high jinks 
are dull enough very often, but the low jinks never; and 
this one was no exception to the rule; songs, mummery, 
and mirth chased the small hours away. But the climax 
came when that preux chevalier, Louis Parrott, in a mo- 
ment of exuberance called for three hundred cigars. They 
were brought to him by the waiter, and forthwith Mr. 
Parrott proceeded to mount the stage. 

"Gentlemen," he exclaimed, hugging his pile of cigar- 
boxes; "Gentlemen, I am not going to sing a song, but I 
will give you an imitation of Donnybrook Pair." 

And straightway he proceeded to scatter the cigars 
broadcast into the amazed audience . 

If ever a scramble took place, it was at that memorable 
moment. The members jumped frantically for the spoils, 
and struggled fiercely for the scattering missiles. It was 
a scene of wild confusion. Coats, collars, watch-chains, 
cuffs, vests, and eye-glasses were torn apart in the fray 
which ensued. 

Meanwhile Parrott took his cab homeward, and every 
body else looked wrecked and dazed — perhaps a little 
foolish. 

They say that about a thousand dollars worth of gar- 
ments were destroyed for those three hundred cigars. 

* * * 

The passers by on one of our fashionable avenues have 
been somewhat mystified by the sounds proceeding from a 
spacious mansion thereon. Frequently of an afternoon, 
sometimes of a morning, a sound of violent scuffling could 
be heard coming from an upper storr, intermingled with 
cries of pain or derision, and now and then a heavy fall. 
Comment was general in the neighborhood, and at length 
a committee of two old ladies essayed to probe the mystery 
by a call of enquiry at the residence, where investigation 
proved the young ladies of the family and several of their 
girl friends were trying to outdo the collegiate style in a 
game of football! ! ! 

* * * 

The remark is frequently heard made by visitors to San 
Francisco, "One sees so many pretty girls in the streets 
and at the theatres, but where do they abide?" If they 
were at the recent elegant ball given by Mrs. Roth, wife of 
a leading Hebrew citizen, they would see that the greatest 
number of pretty girls in our city are in Jewish circles. 

* * * 

On ilit society will have a charming matrimouial engage- 
ment to chatter over early in the new year. The pros- 
pective match, says rumor, is between the nephew of one 
of our oldest society beaux and the granddaughter of a 
late grain king, and was arranged during the visit to the 
rural home of a popular young matron recently. 

* * * 

The girls are gushing over what they call the "ideal" 
match, which the devotion of young Hobart to a pretty 
belle of the season bids fair to be. Wealth and beauty 
united to youth on both sides certainly go far to justify the 
"gush." 



Shakespeare says, "What's in a name?" But our so- 
ciety did not think of this when getting a shock, a few 
mornings ago, by reading in a morning paper the big head 
lines, "Mrs. Fred Sharon Divorced." The pros and cons 
of the probability and possibility of such an event occupied 
the swagger set more than the display of their Christmas 
gifts until it was ascertained the parly alluded to was the 
wife of a cousin of our own "Fred Sharon," and bearing 
the same name. 

DISCONTENT.— n. o. times-osmocrat. 

TWO boats rocked on the river 
In the shadow of leaf and tree. 
One was in love with the harbor, 
One was in love with ihe sea. 

The one that loved the harbor 

The winds of fate oulbore, 
But held the other, longing, 

Forever against the shore. 

The one that rests on the river, 

In the shadow of leaf and tree, 
With wistful eyes looks ever 

To the one far out at sea. 

The one that rides the billow, 

Though sail'mg fair and Meet, 
Looks back to the peaceful river, 

To the harbor safe and sweet. 

One frets against the quiet 
Of the ruoss-grown, shaded shore; 

One sighs that it may enter 
The harbor never more. 

One wearies of the dangers 

Of the tempest's rage and wail, 
One dreams amid the lilies 

Of a far-off snowy sail. 

A goblet of Keystone Monogram Whiskey is said to have saved 
the President's life, when he caught his violent chill in the recent 
duck hunt in Maryland. — Washington Post. 



Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 



6. Marey & 
Lloer-BGlair, 

Nuits (Cote d'Or.) 
Red & White BURGUNOIES 



Clos de Vougeot 

Chambertin 

Beaune 

Pommard 

Chablis (white), and 

Chablis " 1878 



Id Cases. Quarts, 
and Pints. 



Sold by the Leading Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 314 Sacramento St., S. F. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Bullion Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bullion Min- 
ing Company will be held at the office of the company, room •JO, No 331 
Pine St., San Francisco, Cal., on 

THURSDAY, THE 9th DAY OF JANUARY, 1896, 

at the hour of 2 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to seive for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Tuesday, 
January 7th, at 12 o'clock m. R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 20, 331 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 



United States Laundry., 



Office: 1004 Market St., near Baldwin Telephone, South 4-2-0 



January 4, 1896. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







foH CfSSSA 



■ ■ ■ "? . ■ ' _ ' ^ J Ittg*" 1 . 



IT was very nearly not a merry Christmas 
at all this year, with all the Moody- 
thirsty rumors tilling the air and Wall Street in a frenzy ol 

very wild days we bad, several of ti 

era failing under the. --train, and since, for threeor four 
days, we are as mild as a young May moon; conservative 
tolerant, reasonable, and deprecating the possibility of 
warfare in the most Christian manner. But the talk did a 
lot of damage while it lusted It stirred up a great deal of 
latent energy and patriotism, also, and the towns of Hobo- 
ken and Haekensaek. which correspond in playful allusion 
to Milpitas and Petaluma, girded on their armor to the 
extent of enlisting recruits in new born militia companies, 
which may never develop out of their swaddling clothes 
into fully organized creations. 

Every one who has been able to keep war and stocks out 
of his conversation talks Guilbert. the divine, the ineffable, 
unspeakable Yvette. New York is quite mad over her. 

Howard Gould gave a dinner last night at the Holland 
House to Miss Katherine Clemmons and her sister, Mrs. 
( Heraeker. of Pleasauton, Alameda. Miss Clemmons was 
very dazzling in a white satin gown, with American Beauty 
roses. James Brett Stokes has been very evident upon 
the avenue of late. He is doing New York this year under 
the wing of Creighton Webb, he of happy memory in San 
Francisco. 

Mrs. Dominique Yerdenal is entertaining for the holidays 
her daughters. Mrs. Lee Grey and Mrs. Forsythe, of 
Fresno, California. Baron von Schlippenbaeh, the Rus- 
sian Consul at Chicago, who was once well-known in Cal- 
ifornia, is in town at the Clarendon. Miss Evelyn Aron- 
son. who has been visiting New York for several months, 
is leaving for home this week. Miss Rose Sperling, of 
your city, was married here last night to A. H. Levy, and 
will go to California on a wedding tour. Harry Gillig and 
Frank Unger leave to-day for California, after a very jolly 
Christmas in New York. Doctor and Mrs. M. Hanford 
White, who spent a summer in San Francisco and Santa 
Barbara, have decided to go to the latter place this spring, 
and intend building a villa on the beautiful piece of prop- 
erty that Dr. White purchased duringhis visit. I am sure 
that very wide regret will be felt, by the many friends he 
left in California, at the news of the death of George 
Meinecke, which occurred at his father's home in Maribo, 
Denmark, on the sixth of December, after a long and most, 
painful illness. He was very popular in San Francisco 
society with both men and women, and was a man of char- 
acter and heart. W. R. Haxton was 
in town for a few days last week. He 
returns very soon, I am told, to Eng- 
land. Mrs. C. Fair, Mrs. Wilshire, and 
Mr. and Mrs. De Young are in Paris. 
A very curious robbery has just been 
discovered here. Mrs. Irving, the 
widow of Professor Irving, of Yale, 
and mother of the two beautiful young 
actresses — Isabel Irving, of the Ly- 
ceum Company, and Evangeline Irv- 
ing, of the Stuart Robson Company — 
hired several months ago a box in the 
Lincoln Safe Deposit Company, and 
placed in it fifteen thousand dollars 
worth of bonds, the chief source of 
her income. She made, a few days 
ago, her first visit to the office since 
October, and, to her consternation 
and horror, found that all the bonds 
had been abstracted. Search has, 
thus far, proved fruitless, and there 
seems little chance of finding the thief 
who, no doubt, had a duplicate key to 
the box made, and was thus able, 
without question, to gain access to it. 
The poor lady is prostrated with grief. 

It is currently reported that the 
good-looking and popular young actor, 



Evans' 1 



^ Evans' 
\ 

<f Rest Botllcrl 
J Brown Stout 
■ml 

' Indin "nlc Mt. 




' Evans' 

•V-% -*■*.■* -<**k-%. '%'%'V %'%'^%.i 



"Ned" Ratcliffe, has found matrimony not coitleur de 
rose, a view sail! to be shared by his handsome wife, and 
thai a separation is imminent. Mrs. Ratcliffe is a daughter 
of " Pete " de Lacey, of pool-room renown. 

December 27th, 1895, Passe Pahtoct. 



«N One 
ury, a 



■iental room in a pretty house is a delightful lux- 
and one that is not always easily managed. But, 
occasionally, the ambitious household picks up a Persian 
or Turkish relic from time to time, and gradually acquires 
a semblance of the real thing. But now the most magni- 
ficent opportunity is offered that ever happened in this 
part of the world. Colonel Will E. Fisher, the auctioneer, 
at 16 Post street, has on hand a large consignment from 
the Orient of Rugs, Mats, Saddle-bags, Carpets, Prayer 
Rugs, Draperies, Temple Hangings, Palace Embroideries, 
Divan Cushions — in short, all the accoutrements for an 
Arabian Nights' apartment, if one wants to make it. The 
sale goes on every day at two o'clock. Many of the art- 
icles are very ancient, well worth inspection. They have 
just been taken from the Customs House, and are war- 
ranted. 



DURING all the war talk of the past fortnight, it should 
not be forgotten that a certain modest gentleman 
here in San Francisco, Mr. Edward A. Rix, P. E., has 
been the recipient of many congratulations from both army 
and naval officers; for the successful operation of the 
huge pneumatic dynamite gun, which would so well defend 
our port in an emergency, is managed entirely by the 
splendid Rix Air Compressor plant, constructed from his 
own designs. 



borrowing from health. 

/■^ fl'j / If you have borrowed from 

4-iC^? health to satisfy the demands 
of business, if your blood is 
not getting that constant 
supply of fat from your food 
it should have, you must 
pay back from somewhere, 
and the somewhere will be 
from the fat stored up in 
the body. 
The sign of this borrowing is thinness ; the result, nerve- 
waste. You need fat to keep the blood in health unless you 
want to live with no reserve force — live from hand to mouth. 
Scott's Emulsion of Cod-liver Oil is more than a medicine. 
It is a food. The Hypophosphites make it a nerve food, too. 
It comes as near perfection as good things ever come in this 
v/orld. 

Be sure you get Scott's Emulsion wAenyou want it and not a cheap substitute. 

Scott & Bowne, New York. All Druggists; 50c. and $1. 




24 



SAX FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 




^H^J^S^^ T^ Sologial, 



K 



NEW YEAR'S EVE.-sr clement scott. 

I SS me good-night! the day is done, 
Across life's hill the sun has set; 
All! all! have left me; only one 

Remains to love me— or forget? 
We started seaward, to love's land, 

Heart-glad with flowers, sun, and light- 
Lost in the darkness, now we stand. 
Kiss me good-night. 

Kiss me good-night ! our lovely year 

Is folded up and put away ; 
The mists are round us, and a tear 

Is all the pray'r 1 have to pray. 
Why do I weep? I only know 

Life's awful mystery aright. 
You pause! and I have loved you so! 
Kiss me good-night! 

Kis3 me good-night! no more be said. 
For as what can to-morrow bring? 
A cry of pain for what is dead? 

Another New Year's song to sing? 
Time's shadows close around us fast, 

Our lamp of love is still alight; 
0, that we might re-live the past! 
Kiss me good-night! 

SEA AND SKY.-*, y. world. 

Long ago, when the world was new, 
The sapphire sky and the ocean blue 

Wedded one summer day ; 
And the sky still bends as the years go by, 
And the ocean leaps to the bending sky, 

For constant lovers are they. 

But when a mist arises between, 
The ocean grown with jealousy green, 

His doubts to the listener tells, 
He storms and frets, he rages and roars; 
In furious wrath he beats his shores, 

While his turbulent bosom swells. 

The sky, though dark with a moment's frown, 
"Will tenderly from its bight look down 

With a radiant smile divine. 
The green to blue with its magic skill 
'Twill change, and the stormy ocean still, 

And the soul of love will smile. 

Pause, thou, my heart, and the lesson read, 
When the darkness falls and with jealous speed, 

The mists of doubt arise— 
Fret not ! 'twill pass, and thou wilt know 
That the sun still shines with a fervent glow 

In love's unchanging skies. 



HER PROTEST.— c. g. d. in the London spectator. 

Because you see me light and gay 

Playing with that man and with this, 
You turn from me and coldly say, 

"How frivolous she is! " 
Because you hear my laugh ring out 

Careless, amid the ballroom's glare; 
You think that all 1 care about 

In life is only there. 

Because, to your disdainful look, 

I answer with as cold a gaze, 
You sneer: "My lad}' ill can brook 

That one no homage pays." 
Because you note my blush and smile, 

When others bow before my throne, 
You do not know that all the while 

Your mastery I own. 

You will not guess— I cannot tell- 
That though their praises flatter me, 

And though my kingdom please me well, 
I'd leave it willingly. 

To reign as queen beside your hearth, 
To call my own your love, your life, 
Would give up all 1 prize on earth, 
To be your wife. 



Pine and Jones Sts. 



ft ding atid finest Faniilv Hotel in San Francisco. 
The cuisine is the pride ol the hostess. 
Elegantly furnished and sonny apartments, single or en 
suite, with or without bain 

the interior in its beauty and with all its accom- 
modations means to locate permanently. 



SPECIAL RATES 



to permanent guests. Billiard Room, Elevator. 
Convenient to all cars 

MRS. S B. JOHNSON,. 

Southeast corner of Pine and JoDes streets. 



California jim\ 



Is the only MODERN FIRE-PROOF Hotel in San 

Francisco. 

Its rich and brilliant furnishings and finish l\\\(\ 

will please the OlJUj 

its Table will tickle the 



and its Charges protect the 



taste. 
Docket book 



of every Guest. Convenient to business centers. 
Close to all car lines. Every room sunny. 
R. tt. Warfield , Proprietor. 

Conducted on both the 

European and 
American plan 

Bush street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F. 

This ravorite hotel is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Family and Busi- 
ness Men's Hotel in San Francisco Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, 
first-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room: Per day. $1.25, $1.50. $1.75 and $2; per week, $7 to $12; 
per month, $27.50 to $10; single room, 50 cents to $1. 

*S~Free coach to and from the Hotel. 



Brooklyn 
j-iotel ® » 



RIGGS HOUSE, 



Washington, D. C. 



The Hotel " Par Excellence "- 



of tbe National Capital. First-class in 
all appointments. O Q. STAPLES, 
President; G. DeWITT, Treas. 



American plan, $3 per day and upward. 



£bbitt Jtousi?, 



WASHINGTON. D. C. 
H C. BDRCH. Manager. 



POPULAR PRICES— Regular rates. M per day up. Fifty rooms 
on the sixth floor with steam heat and electric light, reduced to 
$2 50 and $3 per day . Fifty rooms on other floors reduced from 
$4 to $3 50 per day. Parlors and alcove parlors at equally low 
rates. Special rates for the Army and Navy Officers and the 
Clergy. 



ON WHEELS. 



G. &S. 



AXLE, GREASE. 



HOME PRODUCTION. 

G0BURN, TEV1S & GO., 107 Front St. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG & CO.. 

The Model 

American 

Caterers. 



1206 Sutter St., S. F. 



Telephone 2388. 



January i. 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO Nl.WS 1. 11 




PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR A C. FREESE. 

ON K of the 1 

iitry. for he was born 

in Denmark, and n 

• " N.% bis training al Oldeloke, in 

-^w-. S swig - Holstein, Ger- 

S ) many. Returning to his own 

country he served a Dumber 

. gtt Vk of years in tin- Danish navy 

, with honor, and afterward, 

p being ambitious, entered the 
merchant service. When the 
1 excitement in Califor- 
\ niahroke out, Captain Prei se 
or the Doited States 
on the steamer Sir John 
Franklin. and afterward 
rounding the Horn on the 
ship Samuel Churchill, ar- 
rived at Panama when the 
Pioneers were crowding the 
tw .(. C. Freete. Isthmus. It was the friend- 

's- liness which he showed to so 

many of our old San Franciscans during his sojourn in 
Panama which endeared Captain Frcese to their memory. 
During the Civil War Captain Freese's conduct was pa- 
triotic. It was he who unloaded the ship Aquilla, at 
Hathaway's wharf. Precious freight was on board — the 
ironsides of our Monitor. The plates were safely and 
quickly transferred by him to the Mare Island Navy Yard. 
To-day Captain Freese says he would fight for the~United 
States at an hour's notice if they would accept him. 

In the contracting business, later on. Captain Freese 
conducted the splendid enterprise of the Oakland Creek 
jetties, where over sixty thousand tons of solid rock were 
used. Then again he put up forty thousand tons of sand 
for the Crystal Spring Reservoir. 

As Public Administrator, however, Captain Freese has 
best shown his skill and honesty in dealing with our civil 
testaments — notably his sagacity and discrimination in 
the Blythe case. 

COLONEL WILLIAM MACDONALD. 

OF all the veteran insurance men, one is pre-eminent in 
this city— Colonel William Macdonald of the London 
and Lancashire Companies, 
drilled in underwriting, 
and, presently, he fcuncl 
himself in partnership 
with the British Consul 
at this port — now Sir 
William Lane Booker. 

The Assurance Syndi- 
cate, which they repre- 
sented, was the largest 
in the world. It included 
the Imperial, London, 
Northern, and Queen In- 
surance Companies. With 
about $40,000,000 cash 
assets to represent, Col- 
onel Macdonald was en- 
terprising, but. at the 
same time, so conserv- 
ative that he was in- 
duced, after three years 

of astonishing success, to accept the agency of the Lion 
Insurance Co., Sir William L. having then departed for 
New York. Nothing succeeds like success, and it is not 
surprising that presently the agency for the Pacific Coast 
of the London and Lancashire Insurance Company was 
offered to Colonel Macdonald. The terms were, so flatter- 
ing that they were acceptable, and the headquarters of 
the London and Lancashire are now with Colonel Mac- 
donald at 315 Montgomery street. Besides this, Colonel 
William Macdonald is at the head of our First Regiment in 
the National Guard, recently re-organized. It was such 
a victory for his friends that they have united in testifying 
their appreciation for bis constant devotion to the interests 
of our State militia. 



Almost from boyhood he was 




H. M. NEWHALL & CO, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
File and Mm ne Insurance Agents, 
309 and 311 Sansome St San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDS NTS: 
KINIiLAY, DURHAM • BRODIB 43i«Dd<«Threiidii,',.dle si.. London 

si mi-son, MACK1RDY » 00 » Soiilb Cattle St., Liverpool 

ST 1IROS. & CO Hind iSloncSt., Now YorU 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Fireman's Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY. OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 

PHENIX INS. CO. OF BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Assets, $5,783,2-13 Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,661. 401 

THE AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Assets, S3 .296.083 



Surplus to Policy Holders, $607,627 



PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Assets ,098,77* Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,889,252 

THE SVEA FIRE INS. CO. OF GOTHENBURG 

Assets. $5,493,831 Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,083,321 

Pacific Department, 407-409 Montgomery street. 

BROWN, CRAIG 4 CO., Managers. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire insurance. . 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 500,000 

Assets 3,747,551 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,654,489 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 401 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF AIX LA r CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1825 

Capital, I2,250.0a Total Assets, $6,854,653 65. 

UNITED STATE EPARTMETiTT: 204 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established m 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. ineorporated ™ 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. F. 

George E. Hall, 

Ageat and importer of 

"* FOREIGN WINES. 

MUTUAL LIFE BUILDING, 222 Sansome St . 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 




THE old year bid us farewell with smiles that were very 
beautiful, albeit rather frosty, and the new year 
dawned amid more smiles a bit warmer in quality. Let us 
hope it may be a harbinger of what is in store for us dur- 
ing the next twelve months. The holiday season has been 
a most pleasant one, and the prospects are excellent for a 
continuance of gay doings for several weeks to come. 
Christmas tree parties were very numerous this year, and 
not only that, but they were noted for their great brill- 
iancy, the old folks as well as the youngsters participating 
in the frolics. Among the number were those at Frank 
Sullivan's, Ned Hopkins', J. D. Staples', and at the Bella 
Vista, and in each instance there were games and dancing 
and supper amid the pleasures of the evening. On Thurs- 
day evening Mrs. Thomas Jennings gave a dance for her 
daughter. Miss Addie Jennings, which was a delightful 
affair. 

The closing events of Christmas week were the holiday 
cotillion of the Friday Fortnightly Club, which was led by 
Mr. Greenway, at Lunt'sHall; the Entre Nous Club dance 
in Maple Half, where Mr. Lewald led the cotillion, with the 
assistance of Miss Lottie Musto, on Friday evening; and 
the dance of the Deux Temps Club, in Oakland, on Satur- 
day evening, which several from this side of the bay at- 
tended. 

The old year went out in a round of gay doings. The 
Monday Evening Club gave a dance at Golden Gate Hall 
on Monday night, and the same night Mrs. Roos gave a 
very large reception at her home on Post street, at which 
dancing was indulged in until far on towards morning and an 
elaborate supper served at midnight. 

On Tuesday Miss Minnie Stubbs was the hostess of a 
large and elegant luncheon in honor of Miss Blackmore; 
the chosen hue for the table adornments, flowers, etc., 
was pink, and there were thirty-two young lady guests 
present. 

Among the evening pleasures was a progressive euchre 
party given by Mrs. Catherwood-Darling in the Major's 
quarters at the Presidio, and Mrs. William Willis gave a 
large dinner party at her California street mansion. 

Diversified in character and widespread in locality were 
the festivities which marked the close of the old and the 
opening of the new year. Society in numbers betook 
themselves to Del Monte for the holiday festivities, which 
included dancing, driving, bathing, games, music, feasting, 
and a good time generally. Burlingame was in great form. 
The place itself was full to overflowing, and the house 
parties in the vicinity were almost as many as the habita- 
tions thereabouts. 

At Mare Island the denizens of the Navy Yard gave a 
dance in the sail loft, which was attended by a number 
from town, while the city itself did not lack for parties to 
see the last of a year which had been one of such uninter- 
rupted pleasure and merry-making. Large balls were 
given by the San Francisco Verein and the Concordia Clubs, 
and private gatherings were very numerous. 

New Year's Day this year was quite reminiscent of the 
"calls" of former years, only that in this instance visitors 
were not restricted to the sterner sex as of yore. Mrs. 
Breeze gave a vety large tea, at which a bevy of the pret- 
tiest maidens of the swim assisted in doing the honors. 
The ladies of the Century Club kept open house at-their 
rooms on Sutter street; Miss Beatrice Sachs gave a tea in 
the afternoon, which was followed by a dance in the even- 
ing; and among other dinuers was one given by Mrs. Hort 
at the Richelieu to the different members of her family. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Grove A. Chitten- 
den to Carl A. Wiudels. The wedding will take place in 
the near future. 

Cooper & Co., art stationers and heraldic engravers, 746 Market St. S.F. 



Odd Fellows' Hall was the locale of the annual dance of 
the Terpsichorean Club on Thursday evening, which always 
takes place during the first week of the new year. Mrs. 
C. M. Dougherty and Miss Ada were "at home" last even- 
ing at their residence on Jackson street, and the second 
cotillion of the Friday Night Club came off at Odd Fellows' 
Hall; the Friday Night Club of Alameda also had their 
monthly dance last evening. To-night will take place the 
annual dinner dance at the Richelieu, to which Mrs. Levy 
requests that her guests ask their friends, and the result 
is a very delightful affair. The one which will take place 
to-night promises to eclipse its predecessors in size and 
elegance. 

Mrs. J. H. Jewett is about to inaugurate a new idea in 
this part of the world for the entertainment of her friends. 
The first of these "recitals upon social life" will be held to- 
day at Mrs. Jewett's Bush street residence, when Miss Lill- 
ian O'Connell will, in costume, give a dramatic recitation en- 
titled "Puritan Pictures." There will be two more — on 
the 18th, when the subject is to be "Through Colonial 
Doorways," and on the 25th, when "Maids and Matrons of 
the Revolution" will be the theme. 

The Dannenbaum-Fletcher nuptials will take place on 
Monday evening next, and those of Miss Gertrude 
Nahpthaly and Lionel Feigenbaum on Tuesday of the follow- 
ing week. The Walter- Mertiff marriage is set for the 21st, 
and will be celebrated upon a scale of great magnificence. 
The wedding of Miss Elsie Meyer and Abe Stern will take 
place in New York City next week, and their honeymoon 
trip is to be taken in this direction, as San Francisco is to 
be their future home. The wedding of Miss Kate Jarboe 
and James Bull will also be among the January ceremonials, 
Mr. Bull having arrived from the East early in the week. 

Theatre parties during the last two weeks have been 
noted not only for their number, but for their size, some of 
them taking up a large space in the auditorium. Among 
the givers were Dr. Tevis, Miss Marie Zane, Walter 
Hobart, Mrs. Ehrmann, Mrs. Schwabacher, Mrs. William 
Haas, Mrs. Collier, and Mrs. Hager. 

Among recent dinner hostesses have been Miss Genevive 
Goad, whose guest of honor was Miss Hyde, of New York; 
Miss Mary Kip, Mrs. Sachs, on Van Ness avenue, Mrs. 
Winsor Brown, Mrs. C. O. G. Miller, Mrs. I. W. Hellman, 
and Miss Rose Hooper, whose dinner was followed by a 
charming dance. 

The Sphinx, of December 7th, a Cairo society journal 
says: Messrs. Albert G. Wieland, John F. Siebe, and Alex- 
andre Lubin, round-the-world travelers from the States, 
have left the Continental, and started on their private 
dahabeyah, " Marie Louise " for Luxor and Assouan. 

Next Saturday night, January 11th, occurs the annual 
election of officers at the Union League Club. More than 
any one else General Dimond has been pressed for the 
Presidency, for many reasons, but especially because he 
has kept out of the Burns-Spreckels fight. So the mem- 
bers have agreed for the most part that, being on neutral 
ground, as it were, General Dimond, as the disinterested 
party, will bring peace and harmony into the League and 
make a first-class leader. 
. The Century Club's New Year's reception was a delight- 
ful affair at the club's rooms, 1215 Sutter street. There 
was a delicious eggnog, which was thoroughly appreciated; 
also an exhibition of artistic "Posters," which is now the 
latest "fad." Ludwig presided over the refreshments with 
his usual success, and what with the pretty decorations, 
and the ladies all in full dress, together with soft music from 
the orchestra, all went merry as a wedding. 

Mrs. Rounsfield Wildman held an old-time New Year's 
reception at her home, 1515 Washington street, Wednes- 
day. It was very popular with society, and the carriages 
came and went all day long. Of course there was a 
sumptuous repast which never failed. 

The pretty holiday lunch of the Sketch Club was a 
novelty. The girls all dressed as peasants of various 
nationalities and brought Christmas presents, each and 
every one, which were finally heaped into a big sack and 
distributed "hit-and-miss." 

Mrs. Louis H. Long, nSe Ermentine Poole, has returned 
to her home in Los Ange les, to remain until April. 



January 4, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THOMAS RIORDAN. 

0' 
irdan. H 
and his k> >f Internal 

prudenoi .im- 

thai he frequently 

lias been called into the 

councils of tlic most emi 

nent statesmen. " As 

ret of success i?- 
ceed," said Tlios. 
D. Riordan, the other 
day. "1 will acknowl- 
edge that in tin' defense 
Of Howell 1 enjoyed 

many difficult quarters 
of an hour I" Riordan 

is always witty, and his 
triumph in the acquittal 
of his client was really 
enjoyed more by his 
friends than by himself 
— just because he was 




77.. 



D. Rhnlan 



so tired out over the constant and patient efforts which he 
had made in behalf of the man for whom he made so brave 
a defense. Mr. Riordan's association with such eminent 
counsellors as W. H. Choate and Wm. Evarts in national 
litigation won him sufficient congratulations to turn a 
young man's head. But the United States Courts here 
have given Attorney Riordan so many verdicts because of 
his ability to "charm a bird off a tree," that his success is 
always his success. 



W. S. WOOD. 

A GREAT winning lawyer is a rare personage, because 
to be really successful at all he has to be thorough. 
Mining laws are more complicated than any others, by 
reason of the technicalities involved. More especially so is 
this the fact on the Pacific Coast, and no one has done 
more to disentangle the great legal problems in the battles 
between giant rival corporations than W. S. Wood, 
of the law firm of Lloyd & Wood. Mr. Wood was 
born in Illinois, and came to California with his 
father in 1852, as a lad, taking up the practice of law. 
Mr. Wood was admitted to the Sacramento bar in 1863, 
and shortly after left for Nevada. For fourteen years he 
made a magnificent record as one of the leading mining 
attorneys in that State. Being associated at various eras 
with such powerful talent as that of Thomas Sutherland, 
C. J. Hillyer, B. C. Whitman, and Judge R. S. Mesick, there 
is no small wonder a man of young Wood's genius and ambi- 
tion should succeed brilliantly, receiving the appoint- 
ment of United States District Attorney for the State of 
Nevada. But he discovered in the year 1877 that there 
was a far wider field in California than that which he en- 
joyed in Virginia City, and consequently be resigned office 
in 1877 and came to San Francisco a short while after and 
opened his office. He entered into partnership 
with Reuben Lloyd, the well-known probate lawyer, and 
to-day the two gentlemen enjoy almost the largest prac- 
tice on the Coast. 

LAST Saturday inaugurated the season at Del Monte, 
and New Years Eve witnessed a grand banquet with 
a ball afterwards. The weather has been superb this 
winter, as usual, and one would think that eai-ly summer 
had arrived. Monterey is so sheltered from icy blasts of 
the North and East, that the proximity to the warm Japan 
Current which happens to cross the mouth of Monterey 
Bay, just at the right place, renders Del Monte the most 
ideal resort of the world. The Riviera in winter has its 
"mistral " from the frozen Alps to chill its visitors to their 
marrow-bones. But in our beautiful California sea-side 
resort there is always warmth, and coaching parties and 
out-of-door luncheons have been in order all the week. 
There is a delightful orchestra of picked musicians for the 
Saturday evening dancing, and Colonel Arnold, the 
manager, takes care to see that every guest has the most 
careful attention. The splendid Bathing Pavilion has been 
thrown open, too, and is as popular as ever. 



tw^Smokelespowder 





The Boss of all SMOKELESS POWDERS 
Manufactured. 

Used by the Grack shots of the country. 

Lowest recorded breech PRESSURE. 
Lightest RECOIL and absolutely no SMOKE. 

Manufactured by 

THE, GIANT POWDER CO., Consolidated, 

430 California St., S. F. 




pommero 
Sec. 



Universally acknowledged by connoisseurs the HIGHEST 
GRADE of champagne. Tourists to the continent of 
Europe observe that POMMERY SEC commands the 
highest price at all better hotels and resorts. At the 
English wine sales POMMERY SEC invariably realizes 
the highest values 

" Exclusively served at the banquet at Atlanta, tendered 
to President GROVER CLEVELAND."--.Wff///« Con- 
stitution. 

" Selected for the banquet in Hamburg given to the GER- 
MAN EMPEROR and GERMAN PrtINCES.--.YeK> York 
Times. 

Selected for the banquet in Bordeaux given to the PRESI- 
DENT of the FRENCH REPUBLIC. 11 — N. Y. Tribune. 
" POMMERY SEC," favored by H. R. H THE PRINCE 
OP WALES and by ROYALTY IN ENGLAND."--^. Y. 
Mail, and Express. 



WM. WOLFF & CO. 



Pacific Coast Agents, 327-329 Market St. 

GRE.M OF ORANGE BLOSSOMS 

Creates SPOTLESS COMPLEXIONS. 

60 cents. Druggists or by mail. 

PACIFIC PERFUMERY CO., S. F,. Ga . 



HAZELTON 
HEMME k LONG 
BROWN & SIMPSON 



735 Market St. 



PIANOS 



Pianos to Rent and sold on Installmet s . 




The modern oxygen cure for 
disease. 

Watson & Co. 



Pacific Coast Agents : 

1&4 MARKET ST. 
Send for circulars. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 




<a»ra — 




CURIOUS Properties ok Viper's Blood.— Messrs. 
Phisalix and Bertrand, who have been studying the 
properties of viper's blood for some time, and who have 
discovered, as alreacly reported in these columns, that it 
contains the same poisonous substance as the vemon of 
the same reptile, gave an account of additional investiga- 
tions before the Paris Academy of Sciences on November 
18th. They had supposed that the viper, which resists 
inoculations of its own venom, did so because it was ac- 
customed to this poison. But they now find in the blood, 
besides the poisonous substance, another substance that 
neutralizes the effect of the former. These two substances 
are destroyed by heat at different temperatures. The 
toxic substance disappears if the blood be kept at a 
temperature of 588 C. during a quarter of an hour, while 
the anti-toxic substance remains. If the blood thus heated 
be injected into a guinea-pig, not only does the animal not 
die, but it can endure an inoculation of fresh viper's 
blood." — Translated and Condensed lor The Literary 
Digest. 

Fruit as an aid to digestion. — Science advises the use 
of fruit as an aid to digestion of other foods; such, for 
example, as apple-sauce, little sweetened, or, still better, 
sour apples baked; or for more developed digestive action 
the raw apple or other fruit. The mandate of science is 
that fruits should be used as an aid to digestion much 
more than they are now. The fruits supply acids which 
particularly assist the acids of the stomach. On the same 
ground, lemon-juice to help weak digestion. A great 
many persons who get up with bad feelings in the morning 
would find themselves cured if they regularly ate an apple 
with a slice of bread or other plain food a little while be- 
fore bed-time. 

The Peanut as a pat producer. — According to The 
Journal of Hygiene, consumptives have been recently 
treated by feeding them with peanuts, with very favorable 
results. The physician who used the treatment reports: 
"The peanut was long known as an excellent fat-producer 
and much more agreeable than rancid shark oil that often- 
times is sold for cod-liver oil. While not all can digest pea- 
nuts, a great many even with feeble digestion eat them 
without discomfort. It beats the Ko3h lymph and is the 
most satisfactory treatment I have ever tried for these 
diseases." 

Heai.tufulness or CRYING. — The disposition of the 
typical young lady to have " a good cry " seems to have 
been found physiologically proper. Medical authorities 
assert that crying is the best exercise for young children. 
One hospital superintendent says that a healthy baby 
should cry three or four times a' day at least, and from 
ten to fifteen minutes at the time. 

An electric plow. — A cousular report from Leipzic 
gives interesting particulars of the use of an electric plow, 
not only in farming on ;i large scale but in small husbandry, 
and at the cost of $1.29 per acre against Si'. 74. the cost of 
doing the work with oxen. As compared with the ex- 
pense of working the steam plow, the working expenses 
of the electric plow amount to less than one-half. 

An eci itiiAN. — Westminster Abbey has been supplied 

with an echo organ placed at a distance from the main 
organ, but so connected with i.t electrically as to make it 
as sensitive in responding to touch of the keys as is the 
main instrument. 



The 'Argonaut" is one of the most popular brands of Kentucky 
Bourbon Whiskeys, and one of the purest and best found in this 
market. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, where they are now 
located, are the agents for this excellent whiskey on the Pacific 
Coast, and are also the authorized agents for the celebrated J. F. 
Cutter Bourbon. The trade will make no mistake in buying the 
Argonaut brand. 

Mothers, be sure and use ''Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething 



BANKING. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 
Capital Paid Up. J3.000.000. Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits, 81,181,910 

Southeast Cok. Bosh and Sansome Sts. 
head office 60 lombard street, london 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta 
coma, Washington, 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on gbod collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico; 
South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October 1, 18941.. 3.158,129 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York. Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-oo-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, June 30, 1895 $24,303,873 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,643,277 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. a. m. to 3 P. M. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 1 Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve $375,000 

San Francisco Office — 124 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St. 
Portland Branch — Chamber of Commerce Building. 
Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER I Ass't Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoutere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers* Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENBAUM 1 Manft „ PR 
C. ALTSCHUL / Managers. 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $250,000. Cash Reserve Fund, $25,000. 
L. R. ELLERT. Manager. 
This company loans money on real estate and transacts a general trust 
business. It also makes and continues abstracts of title and issues guar- 
antee policies which protect the holder against loss. 
OFFICE— Mills Building. San Francisoo. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 J Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 f Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) Manfll? p r „ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL/ Mana K ers - 



January 4. 1896. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 







THE difficulties of the K piage are well illus- 

■ i in u st<>i told "f three French boya 

who were doinjj - ,:ish from their 

When they came to the line from Bam- 
To be or not to be,' the three translations came out 
ir not to am," "Towereor i^ to not," 
"To -Mould or not to will.'*- Ex. 

An old man and his wife wore last month sailing on a 
steamship between Blackpool and the Isle of Man. As 
the sea was rather rough and the old woman unaccustomed 
to sailing, she said to her husband: "Oh, John, this ship is 
s» down ! " "Well, never mind," said her husband, 
"it isn't ours." — Tid-Bits. 

•• You will fall in love," Ihey said. In affright 
I fleil from each chasm lo peaks above. 
And when I attained the Heaventuost height 

I found they were wrong— I had climbed to love! 

— Ladies' Home Journal. 
"I'm afraid that man who aspires to your hand is too 
weak kneed to make you a good husband," said her father. 
"Oh. papa, he's not that! He's held me on them for 
hours at a time! " — Yonkers Statesman. 

BuiLDKB — Aren't you afraid of having your tools stolen 
when you leave them around so carelessly? Carpenter — 
Don't you worry. All those things wili be found in your 
bill. — Philadelphia Record. 

Maud — They say that sealskins are going out. Marie 
— Of course they are. What good are they in the house ? 
— New York World. 

"Susan, just look here 1 I can write my name in the 
dust on the top of this table." " Lor', mum, so you can ! 
Now, I never had no edgercation myself." — Punch. 

" I don't think this portrait of my wife you have just fin- 
ished is very much like her." " Sir, I am a painter and 
not a photographer." — Humoristische Blatter. 

Sue — Are you a bull or a bear on the Stock Exchange? 
He (growling)— A bull. She (sweetly)— Then I wish you'd 
be a bear there instead of at home. — Pun. 

Willie — Will Santa Claus bring his card with him, 
papa? Papa — His card? Why, my boy, he'll bring a pack. 
— Yonkers Statesman. 

On Christmas Day. — Mr. Simps— Well, Tommy, what 
did you get in your stocking this morning? Tommy — My 
foot. — World's Comic. 

He gave up whiskey and tobacco, 

Vowed from vice to be exempt, 
And he kept his resolutions, 

For he died in the attempt.— Truth. 

Mrs. Johnson — Your husband has great ability. Mrs. 
Stimson (who has discovered her husband) — Yes. Irrita- 
bility.— Truth. 

She — Why does a woman take a man's name when she 
marries him? He — Why does she take everything else he's 
got?— Truth. 

The Russians, it is said, are fond of eating candles. The 
Chinese, on the other hand, go in for a Feast of Lanterns. 
— Judy. 

The Powers are still singing ''Oh, Promise Me " to the 
Sultan. — Washington Post. 

"When is a joke not a joke?" "Usually." — Pick- 
Me-Up. 

The Grand Canyon Line I — To the East. 
The "Santa Pe Route " Popular Overland Excursions to Chicago 
and Eastern cities will leave every Wednesday. Manager in charge. 
Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are run to Chicago 
every day. This is the only Line by which the Grand Canyon of the 
Colorado River can be reached. Send for illustrated book giving 
full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. G. P. A., 644 Market St., Chronicle 
Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



BANKING. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

XJ Post Strict. b«ia>w Kk.miny, Mbchakh-s' IifSTiTtm Hdildiho. 
Quaranlocd Capital. II uimlj 1'ald Up Capital. 1300,000. 

James 11 I'hkl.w, PratldoDU I S Q MURPHY, vu.- iv-idom. 
JOHN a Hi 

Directors— James D. Phclan. L I*. DrSXlsr, John A. Hooper, C. Q. 
Hooker. James Moult, S. Q. Murphy. Frank J. Sullivan, Kobort McElroy. 
I'll U. Gram. 
Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits, Loans on approved ho- 

\ ST. iky. Cashier. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well. Fargo. & Co., or Exchange 
od City Banks. When opening nccounts send signature. 



The Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, s. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topios, business 
and personal. 



WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. CORNER SANSOMB & SUTTEIl BTBSSX6 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N.Y.City.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S, King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1 ,250,000 

Successor to Satber & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

James K. Wilson, President. C. F. A . Talbot, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowcill, Cashier. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, Charles Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, 
Wm. P. Johnson, C. F. A. Talbot. James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel. Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics" Bank. Kansas City — First National Bank. London — 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $1,000,000. Reserve Fund $ 685,000 

Deposits, June 29, 1895, $30,472,837 66. Guaranteed Capital. ,$1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, B. A. Becker; Vice-President, Edward Kruse; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS. 
Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Lincoln. 



CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cor. Market, -Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital $1,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNSTBRAND Secretary 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY, 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored In warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

p A T E N T S . AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PATENTS. 

BOONE. & MURDOGK, (E. F. Murdock. Jno.L. Boone). 
San Francisco Office: Nucleus Building, Cor. Market and Third Sts. 
Washington Office: Opposite Patent Office. 



3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 



3 © Q®«* 




DEAR EDITH:— The review of a year of fashion finds 
us nearly where we were. Why and how Queen Marie 
Antoinette and the Princesse de Lamballe should have set 
such alluring fashions in the last century is natural, but 
the curious repetition of the present era is a social phenom- 
enon. 

Sleeves continue to be just as large as they were last 
year, and yet the capes, with their high collars, are thor- 
oughly "Marie de Medici." Verily, women and their arts 
are a kaleidoscope! Also, they are full of anachronisms in 
their fashions. But then what do they care so long as they 
are attractive. I dare swear the ugliest st3'les ever intro- 
duced in the world's history were a beautiful surprise in 
the men's eyes. For it's all nonsense to say that women 
dress for women. They dress simply for men, and they 
know it. 

But never have we had such an era of mad expense — 
brocades, figured velvets, rich fur trimmings, and, last of 
all, we've come to costly old lace. 

Even the simplest New Year's gifts are not an excep- 
tion to the rule. For instance, I saw a bonbonniere affair 
that was intended for a bride. It was a lace hammock, 
swung between two slender silver poles on a silver stand; 
the hammock was very dainty, and filled with the rarest of 
bonbons. It must have cost a cold fifty dollars. Then there 
was sent to a young woman at Stanford University an 
elaborate " mortar-board," trimmed with old lace! Fancy 
the sacrilege. It also was filled with sweets. 

But lace has become so much a part of our being now- 
adays that it enters into every part of our domestic auton- 
omy. Silk is used in petticoats, but no longer as under- 
wear. The beautiful blonde on the " Hill" who recently 
brought back a dozen-dozen of black silk nightgowns, will 
weep to find that she should wear cambric, nainsook, or 
dainty linen. 

Nowadays a very pretty night gown is cut square in the 
neck in front, with deep sailor collar, striped with rows of 
insertion falling over the shoulders and ending on each side 
in a point at the waist. Lace drapery and ribbons of pink 
or green complete the picture. A straight full piece in 
front covers the bust, and is drawn in with ribbons. A 
row of lace frilled on trims the collar and extends below 
the points in front, half way down the skirt, which has a 
deep hem on the bottom, and two rows of lace insertion let 
in just above. 

Another creation involves dainty nainsook with a round 
yoke, shirred slightly, the edge trimmed with a deep ruffle 
of nainsook and Valenciennes lace. A"watteau" in the 
back is gathered in, and falls from the edge of the yoke 
under the ruffle. Passing beneath it is a ribbon which 
binds the waist. The sleeves are very full and long, and the 
flowing cuffs are of lace. 

Corset covers are another extravagance. They are 
built on an elaborate plan. Here is one— the latest. It is 
fitted to the figure in front by a succession of tucks reach- 
ing from the waist to the bust, from whence the fulness is 
drawn in around the shoulders. Two or three rows of in- 
sertion are let in, a narrow lace edges the top. For a 
bride, there must be loads of lace. 

Tucked and lace-trimmed flounces laid over each other, 
and falling like cascades, are the latest idea. Usually 
they are made of tine nainsook and point de Paris lace. 
Also they are costly. 

To calculate the expense of the female form divine, when 
fully clad to her heart's desire, this New Year's is a pro- 
blem for the most anxious husband. Simplicity has been 
thrown to the winds, and the country had better hurry up 
and issue new bonds before all its money gives out. 

Belinda. 

The beautiful suites at the Pleasanton, which have been re- 
furnished entirely, are rapidly being taken by our bestsociety people. 
Colonel Brennan promises a merry winter. 



MME. MflRGnflND'S GREME DE, LA GREME. 



A delightful preparation 
for preserving and beau- 
tifying the complexion. 

Awarded diploma at Me- 
chanics' Fair. 1895, for 
superior merit. 

Samples of Creme de la 
Creme given away. 



Endorsed by 

W. T. Wenzell, M.D. , Ph.G. 

Ph M. 
Wm. M. Searby, PhC. 
C. F. Jones, Ph. C. 
C. A. Clinton, M.D., ex- 
member Board of Health. 
G. W Gerlach.Ph.G. M.D 
W. M. Logan, Ph.G. M.D 
D* . Lichau, 
Dr. Murpby. and others. 

MME. MARGHAND, Hair *nd Complexion Specialist, 

Rooms 30 to 41. 12L Post St. Taber's entrance. Telephone 1349. 
Send for booklet. 




ft 

Well 
Dressed 
Woman 



Should have 

Fashionable Modes, Well Fitting, 
Perfect in Workmanship and 
Elegant Finish. 

I furnish these requisites. 

Mrs. ft. J. Bradleu, Modiste ' 

313 Geary St , San Francisco. 



R. 

LIDDLE Co. I 



Sportsmen's Goods $ 



<t Fine 
Goods 



110 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco. 



o> Gheap. <* 



Write for atalogue. 



"In the 
Field of 
Sports." 

New book free 




For the best value in 

HATS or CAPS 
Go to 

G. Herrmann & Go. 

Tne Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 

Near Pine. (Er tire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
haviDg their own factory. 



Gray Bros., 



316 Montgomery Street, S F. 

No. 205 New High St.. Los Angeles. 



Concrete Artificial 
Stone Work. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a u ox of ROBERTS' Best. 

PHYSICIANS. 

Dr. R. Elmer Bunker has removed to 630 Suiter street. 

Office Hours: 1 to 3 and 6:30 to 7:30 p. it. 

Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Thomas L. HIM, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows' Building, southwest corner Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours: 4 to 5. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 
Joseph Greven, Vocal Teacher, Neumann Piano Store, 82 Ninth St., S. F. 

A Sovereign Remedy— DR. PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. Try it. Price 35c. 

George Dahlbender & Co., 214 Kearny street. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 
Neuhaus & Co., 115 Kearny, up-stairs. Suits to order $12 50. Over- 
coats. $10. Pants $4 and upwards. Samples by mail. 
fl^-A per fect fit guaranteed. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105O'Farrell St., S. F. 

J. ft. W. Uundborg, Dentist, 

336 POST STREET, Rooms 2-3. (Opposite Union Square 
Telephone 2275, San Franoisoo. 



January 4. 1S96. 



JAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 



CARCA5SONNE.-#t.o*« t rwifioi 

[FRmM THE KREN< H ..»■ QUBTAYl NALAII. 

I'M irrowinc .ty y<*rs; 

I'tc labored all my lift- in rain: 
la all that lime of hopes and (ears 

I've (ailed my dearest wish (o gain. 
I see full well that here below 

BUM unalloyed there la for none. 
My prayer will ne'er fulfillment know— 
I never have seen "arcassonne. 
I never have seen Carcassonne ! 

You see the city from the hill. 

It lies beyond the mountain blue, 
And yet to reach it on*' imi-i still 

Five long and weary league* pursue: 
And to return, as many more! 

Ah! had the vintage plenteous grown ! 
Thejjrape withheld Its yellow store. 

1 shall not look on Carcassonne. 

I shall not look on Carcassonne ! 

They tell me every day is there 

Not more nor loss than Sunday gay; 
In shining robes and garments fair 

The people walk upon their way. 
One gazes there on castle walls, 

As grand as those of Babylon, 
A bishop and two generals! 

I do not know fair Carcassonne. 

I do not know fair Carcassonne! 

The vicar's right; he says that we 

Are ever wayward, weak and blind ; 

He tells us in his homily 

Ambition ruiDS all mankind; 

Yet could I there two days have spent, 
While still the autumn sweetly shone, 

Ah, me! I might have died content 
When I had looked on Carcassonne, 
When I had looked on Carcassonne ! 

Thy pardon, Father, I beseech, 
In this my prayer, if I offend; 

One something sees beyond his reach 
From childhood to his journey's end. 

My wife, our little boy Aignan, 

Have traveled even to Narbonne; 

My grandchild has seen Perpignan, 
And I have not seen Carcassonne, 
And I have not seen Carcassonne! 

So crooned, one day, close by Limsux, 
A peasant, double bent with age, 
" Rise up, my friend," said 1, " with you 
I'll go upon this pilgrimage." 

We left next morning his abode, 

But (Heaven forgive him I) half-way on 

The old man died upon the road ; 
He never gazed on Carcassonne, 
Each mortal has his Carcassonne ! 



THE Braver-man case has interested a number of men 
who possess a small sum of money to lend. Isaac 
Kohn says that the pioneer jewelry merchant is not an in- 
solvent debtor; — the suit involves fifty thousand dollars. 
Kohn says he lent this to Louis Braverman in various sums 
and at various times. For it he took the alleged mortgages 
on water front property. Now Mr, Kohn is out on the 
warpath to recover the earth if he can get it; — also he 
would like to have uncle Daniel Meyer involved — according 
to his complaint. And this, because Meyer happens to 
have a neice who got married once upon a time. 



THE California missions have become the subject of 
romance, and the world is gradually beginning to 
realize that while our State has supplied the whole world 
with some billions of dollars in solid gold coin, it also 
possesses a grand story in itself — of the old Spanish days. 
The architecture was modest but beautiful, and now that 
it has been reproduced in a portfolio by L. Prang & Co., 
of Boston, whose agent, Mr. Dorety, 1230 Eight avenue, 
East Oakland, has introduced it here, doubtless many will 
frame the beautiful pictures — just to see them every day. 



No visitor ever fails to visit the wonderful Japanese goods and 
cloisonne* ware at Geo. T. Marsh & Co.'s, under the Palace Hotel. 



A lamp with wrong chim- 
ney is like a man with another 
man's hat on — what is lie 
good for ? 

A Macbeth Co, Pitts- 
burgh, will Rpod you the " In- 
dex to Chimneys." 

Pearl plass. pearl top, tough 
glass. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Hale & Norcross Silver Mining Company. 

1 ;on or print- i pal pltce "f business— San Franolsoo, Cal, Location 
of works— Virginia Mining District, Stores 1 County, Ne 

Notice is bereby given thai al ■ meeting ol the Board of Trustees, held 
on Tuesday, the Tenth [10th] day ol December, L895, an assessment 
iNo. lOfl) ol Fifteen Oenta ific per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of the corporation, payable immediately, in United Stales gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office Of the company, room 26, Nevada Mod;, 800 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
15th DAY OF JANUARY. 1896, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at publio auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Friday, the 7th day of February, 
1896, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 300 Montgomery St.. San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Challenge Consolidated Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business—San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 20th day of December, 1805. an assessment, No. 20, of 5 cents per 
share, was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 35, third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Montgomery 
and Bush streets, San Francisco, California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
33D DAY OF JANUARY. 1806, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Wednesday, the 12th day of February, 
1806, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. McCOY. Secretary. 
Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Building, northeast corner Montgomery 
and Bush streets, S. F.,Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining ompan 

Assessment No. 21 

Amount per Share 15 cents 

Levied December 17, 1805 

Delinquent in Office January 20, 1806 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock February 10, 1806 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, N evada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending Dec. 31, 1895, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four and thirty-two one-hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, per annum on 
term deposits and three and sixty one hundredths (3 60 100) per cent, per 
annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable ou and afte* Wednes- 
day, January 1, 1806 Dividends not called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of dividend as the principal, from and after January 1, 1806. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY t Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For tne half year ending with the 31st of December, 1805, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of four and thirty-two one-hundredths 
(4 32-100) per cent on term deposits and three and six-tenths {3 6-10) per cent 
on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Thursday, the sec- 
ond of January, 1896. 

Office— 582 California street, cor. Webb LQVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1895, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four and one-fifth (4 1-5) per cent, per annum on term deposits, 
and three and one-half (3!->) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Thursday, January 2, 1896. 
Office— 33 Post street. San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending December 31st, 1895, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and twenty-six one hundredths (4 26-100) per cent 
per annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty-five one hundredths 
(3 55-100) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after Thursday, January 2, 1896 
Office— 526 California street. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of tne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Dec. 30, 1895. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six mouths ending December 31, 1895, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and alter January 2, me. ROBERT J. TOBTN. Secretary. 



3- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1896. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. . 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO! 

Leave, \ From November 80, 1895. | Arrive 

6:30 a Havwards, Niles, and Way Sta- 
tions 10:15 A 

7:00 a Atlantlo Express, Ogdenund East 8:45 P 

7:00 a Bonioia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Redding, via Davis 7:15 p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Napa.C&l- 

istoga, and Santa Rosa .... 6:15 P 

8:30A Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red 
BluQ*, Sundays excepted Orovllle 4:15 P 
♦8:30 A Peters and Milton *7:15P 

9:00 a San Leaudro Hay wards and Way 

Stations 11:45 A 

9:00a Los Angeles Express, Raymond, 
(for Yosemite), Santa Barbara, 
and Los Angeles — 4:45p 

9:00a Martinez and Stockton 10:45a 

10:00 a San Leandro, Hay wards, Niles... 1 :45 p 
12:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 2:45P 

1:00 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore. .. 8:45 a 

*l :00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

tl :30 p Port Costa and Way Stations .... f7 :45 p 

3:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5:45 p 

4 :'0 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 6:45 P 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 
Sanla Rosa 9:15A 

4:00p Benicia, Esparto, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 
Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45 a 

4:30p Niles. San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7:15 p 

5:00p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8:45 P 

3:30p New Orleans Express, Fresno, 
Bakerstield, Santa Barbara, Los 
Angeles. Deming. El Paso, New 
Orleans, and East 10:45A 

3:30 P Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojave and East 10:45A 

6:00 P European mail, Ogdenand East. . 9:45 A 

6:00 P Haywards, Niles and San Jose. . . 7:45 a 
J7 :00 P Vallejo fl :45 P 

7:00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 
Puget Sound and East 10:45 a 

7:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:50 P 

9:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

S tations ttl2 :00 a 

H10:05p "Sunset Limited," Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans 
and East \ 12 :45 p 

t+ll:15P Sau Leandro, Haywards and 

Way Stations 7:15 a 

Santa Croz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:15a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 

and way stations 5:50 P 

•2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *11:20a 

4 :15 P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9 :50 A 

til :45 p Hunters' Excursion. San Jose and 
Way Stations 17:20 P 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:45 a San Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only 1:45 P 

8:15 a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe and prin- 
cipal way stations 7:05 P 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 5:00 P 

11 :45 a Palo Alto and way stations 3 :30 p 

*2:30PSau Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove *10 :40 a 

*3:30pSan Jose and principal way sta- 
tions 9:47 A 

•4 :30 P San Jose and Way Stations *8 :06 a 

5:30 p San Jose and way stations *8:48a 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:35 A 

tll:45P San Jose and way stations t?:45P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot or Market street 
(Slip 8). 

*7:15. 9:00, and 11:00 A. M., II :00, *2:00, 13:00, 
*4:00, J5:00and *6:00P. m. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway. 

*6:00,8:00, 10:00 A. M.; 112:00, *1 :00, 12:00, 
♦3:00,14:00 *5:00p. m. 

a for Morning. p for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

JSundays only. ^Tuesdays and Saturdays. 

ft Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Sundays and Thursdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information. 



WISE AND OTHERWISE. 

We always have time enough, if we will 
but use it aright. — Goethe. 

A tyrant never tasteth of true friends-hip, 
nor of perfect liberty.— Diogenes. 

There is no courage but in innocence; no 
constancy but in an honest cause.— 
Southern. 

Theologies are well in their place, but re- 
pentance and love must come before all 
other experiences. — Beecher. 

Of all our infirmities, vanity is the dearest 
to us; a man will starve his other vices to 
keep that alive.— Franklin. 

The saddest failures in life are those that 
come from not putting fonh the power and 
will to succeed.— E. P. Whipple. 

When suffering has broken up the soil, 
and made the furrows soft, then can be im- 
planted the hardy virtues which outbrave 
the storm.— Punshon. 

Few things are more important to a com- 
munity than the health of its women. If 
strong is the frame of the mother, says a 
proverb, the son will give laws to the peo- 
ple.— T. W. Higginson. 

No man can, for any considerable time, 
wear one face to himself and another to the 
multitude, without finally getting be- 
wildered as to which is the true one.— 
Hawthorne. 

Whatever can lead an intelligent being to 
the exercise or habit of mental enjoyment 
contributes more to his happiness than the 
highest sensual or mere bodily pleasures. 
The one feeds the soul, while the other, for 
the most part, only exhausts the frame, and 
too often injures the immortal part. — Anon. 

In the schools of the wrestling master, 
when a boy falls he is bidden to get up 
again, and to go on wrestling day by day 
till he has acquired strength; and we must 
do the same, and not after one failure suffer 
ourselves to be swept along as by a torrent. 
You need but will, and it is done ; but if you 
relax your efforts you will be ruined; for 
ruin and recovery are both from within.— 
Epictetus. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through line to New York, via Panama, call- 
ing at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America . Sailing at noon from oompany 's 
wharf, First and Brannan streets. 
No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 
S. S. " Colon," Jauuary 8. 1896- 
S. S. "City of Svduev," January is, 1896. 
S. S. "San Bias," January 28, 1895 
S S. "San Juan." February 8, 1896. 

Japan and China Line for Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc. 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

S. S. "Peru," January 18, 1896. 
S. S. "City or Rio de Janeiro." Feb 6, 1896. 
S. S. "City of Peking," via Honolulu, Febru- 
ary 25, 1896. 
S. S. "China," March 14, 1896. 

Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the Company's 
office, No. 435 Market street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

For Japan and China. 
Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

Afridi (Cargo only). .Thursday, January 9, 1896 
Coptic (via Honolulu)... Tuesday, Jan. 28,1896 
Gaelic Saturday, February 15, 1896 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 



D. D. STUBBS. Secretary. 



ft. BUSWELL, 

Bookbinder, Paper-Ruler, Printer 
and Blank Book Manufacturer. 
516 Commercial St., S. P. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20. 11:00 A M; 13:36,8:80 
5:10, 6:30 P M. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 P M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :5U 
and 11 :30 p h. 

SUNDAYS— 8:1X1,9:30. ll:00A m; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
6:30 PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 AM; 13:45, 
3:40. 5:10 pm. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:55 
and 6:35 p M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:35 PM. 
B-.-tween San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 

same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Effect 
Oct. 28, 1895. 

DESTI'TION. 


ARRIVE IN S. F. 


^Sundays. 


Sundays. 


Week 
Days. 


7:40am 8:00 am 1 Novato, 
3:30 FM; 9:30 AM Petaluma, 
5:10 pm 5:00pm ■ Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 
605 pm 
7:30 pm 


8:50 AM 
10:30am 
6:15PM 






Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville, 

Cloverdale. 




















3:30 PM 


8:00am 


7:30pm 


6: 15PM 



i. m . „ I Pieta. Hop- I 
'• 00AM lland. UkiahJ 



7 :40a Ml 
3:30pm| 



8:00am Guerneville 7:30pm 



1 10 30am 
l6:15PN 



7:40AM| 
5:10pm| 



8:00AM 
5:00 pm 



Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 



10:40am |8:50am 
6:05pm |6:15pm 



7 :40 a Ml 
3:30pm| 



8:00 am 
5:00 pm 



Sebastopol. 



110:40AM 110:30am 
I 6:05pm |6:15pm 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes. Laurel Del Lake, Saratoga Springs, 
Upper Lake, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City. Fort Bragg, Usal, 
Westport, Laytonville, Willitts, Capella, Porno, 
Potter Valley, John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly 
Valley, Harris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 



TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 

H. C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 A. M. : Jan. 15, 30. 

ForB. C. and Puget Sound ports, Jan. 5,10, 
15, 20, 25, 30, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pom- 
ona," at 2 p.m. Jan, 2. 6, 10, 14, 18,22,26, 30 and every 
fourth day thereafter 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a. m. Jan. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles , Redondo, (Los 
Angeles)andNewport,Jan.2,6,10, 14 18,28,96,80, 
and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. m. 

For Ensenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz Altata, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley," 10 a.m., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-fields, 
(Freemantle) Australia, 
$220 first class, $110 steer- 
age. Lowest rates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 

For HONOLULU, APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S ALAMEDA, 
Jan. 9tb, 1896, at 2 p. m. 

For HONOLULU, S. S- 
"AUSTRALIA," 
Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 10 a m. 

REDUCED SPECIAL RATES for parties Feb. 
6th and 15th, 1886. 

For passage apply lo 114 Montgomery street. 

For freight apply to 327 Market street. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 




frier /'-- /'/v. 10 t'r»t$ 




«Mi r "^CU Cq 




Annual Suhncripliim, ti.OO. 



(tfalif xrrum^tarti sjer. 




~Ko/. III. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 1896. 



Number 2. 



rn 



., 3B/«nfay 6y iltt proprietor. Fit El) l/.l HBIOTT, 
#w-«w>-«"f.t HereAant ttrttt. San Francuco. Entered at San Francieco 
I'ntlojKee a* Seeond-etafi* Matter. 
Tke Of UTTER in .\V,r York City is nt TtmpU OOilH, 

■'fir,), nherr information may 
be <<> • '<<ina ratrs. 

OLD Mrs. Davidson is entitled to the thanks of this com- 
munity for one thine.'. She lias given us a rest from 
Durrant. 



SOME good ideas were brought out at the session of 
the California State Teachers' Association in Oakland 
the other day. One of the instructors declared her con- 
viction that children are sent to school at too early an 
age. and that too little attention is paid to their health. 
Another teacher called attention to the general neglect of 
sanitary regulations in the public schools, and formulated a 
series of rules as to light, ventilation and other matters of 
prime importance. It is refreshing to find that a growing 
sentiment exists as to the folly of cultivating the minds of 
children at the expense of their bodies. 



INVENTOR Edison is confident that in the event of war 
with England, electricity would come into play as an 
important element for the defense of our coast cities. He 
says that many new sorts of torpedoes could be electrically 
managed and discharged under water, so as to sink whole 
fleets of war-ships that might venture into or near our 
ports. In fact, if Mr. Edison is to be believed, the navy 
that would dare to attack any of our great seaboard 
cities would be in danger of annihilation — after the 
electrical defenses were completed. But there's the rub: 
the ships might not wait until the electrical preparations 
had been finished. But if there's any merit in the great 
inventor's ideas, let the Government put them into opera- 
tion at once. 



WE may not all be rich, but as a people we are some- 
times exasperatingly lucky. The extract of malt and 
hops, the risen lord of the English breweries, who has 
chosen our city as an arena to prove that he has a deal 
more money than brains, is reported as intending a visit to 
the cannibal islands. Let him not hesitate to go. The 
cannibals are said to be eaters of men, and it is possible 
they may mistake him for a man, if they shut their eyes 
and swallow him before they discover that he is only a 
flunkey. Gag him, that he may not speak, and disguise 
him as a decent brewer's son, and commend him prayer- 
fully to the tender mercies of the man-eaters, scarcely 
nearer the original chimpanzee than himself. So may the 
Lord continue to him his only wise thought. 

WE don't know whether the Bev. C. O. Brown has been 
guilty of a sin of the flesh, or not. So far as his fitness 
as a minister of God is concerned, it doesn't make much dif- 
ference. If innocent, he has shown himself to be such an 
infinitely silly ass that no man, nor even woman, would 
tolerate him longer in the place to which a rather dull 
people have elevated him. If any man can show such in- 
corrigible ignorance of the way to walk through this dark- 
world, he could never attain "the knowledge to guide the 
feet of innocence to the road that leads to God's country. 
The way thither is full of the obstructions of ignorance and 
sin, through the slough of despond, and up the hill of diffi- 
culty. And Brown — he seems utterly unable to find the 
way for himself, and he certainly cannot guide us, old 
sinners as we are, nor you, sweet maids, who wear the 
white robes of purity, with eyes upturned. 



TH E defeat of the old management of the Academy of 
Sciences, in the election of officers this week, infuses 
new blood and will tend greatly to enlarge the usefulness 
of the institution. It had.Joug been a close corpora- 
tion For IV. Harkness and his satellites, but the public 
will henceforth take more interest in the Academy and its 
work. This institution should be conducted in a way to 
add something to the reputation of the city, but heretofore 
it has been rather more of a laughingstock than respected 
for its scientific achievements. With its magnificent en- 
dowment, the Academy should be conducted in a way to 
win distinction for the institution in the world of science. 



BROTHER Bovard of Alameda, who had an alarming fit 
over the punch-bowl which the ladies that enter- 
tained Kate Field presented to the Press Club, has fallen 
down in another. The provocation to epilepsy this time 
are the orgies which his clairvoyant eye sees going on in 
the clubs of quiet and virtuous Alameda. It seems that 
the members of these monstrous associations, composed of 
reputable citizens, take a drink and play a game of cards 
when they feel like it. Even they invite ladies to witness 
their " high jinks " occasionally, and at these festivals the 
wine-cup actually is visible. When Brother Bovard has 
recovered, it would be an act of friendly reciprocity were 
the clubs of Alameda to request him to preach a sermon 
giving his views on the case of Brother Brown of San Fran- 
cisco. 

THIS is getting to be be such a boisterously noisy world 
that one cannot peaceably retire into his own thoughts 
and indulge to his full extent in the sweetness of his native 
piety. The din of the drum and trumpet of the Salvation 
Army recalls us to the existence of sinners possibly worse 
than ourselves. Then comes a Presidential message send- 
ing out its flashes of American Monroe doctrine lightning, 
when there comes a crash of English thunder so quick 
thereon, that we are certain it must have struck some- 
where. We have scarcely recovered our repose when Dr. 
Jameson and his filibuster crew begin to march on the 
Transvaal Republic, the Emperor of Germany pricks his 
ears, and asks Chamberlain what's up, and by the time the 
latter has solemnly declared that the British Government 
is not in it, President Krueger wires that the Republic is 
safe, William replies that he is glad, the whole English 
people are immediately mad, and there does seem as if 
there was going to be the very devil to pay. 



THE clever forgery by which A. H. Holmes lightened 
the banking capital of this city to the extent of $20,- 
000, by means of a raised check, has taught the bankers a 
lesson that they are not likely to soon forget. The moral 
of the affair is that reliance on mechanical devices to pre- 
vent forgery is altogether unsafe, since the work of these 
contrivances may be as cleverly imitated as handwriting 
itself. In fact, in this remarkable instance, the perfora- 
tion of the paper, relied upon as a safeguard, was made 
the chief means of perpetrating a bold and brilliant fraud. 
But if any of these mechanical devices have merit, that 
which corrugates the whole length of the line on which 
the amount of the check is written is probably the most 
difficult to overcome. No matter, however, what sort of 
paper or instrument may be employed, there re- 
mains the necessity of great caution in the cashing of 
checks or drafts for large amounts, when presented by 
persons not thoroughly well-known or fully identified as 
trustworthy and responsible. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 1 1, 1896. 



DR. BROWN AND HIS CHURCH. 

THE attorneysof the Rev. Dr. Brown, in taking the stand 
that it is not he who is on trial for immorality, but Mrs. 
Davidson for blackmail, are unquestionably legally in the 
right, so far as the preliminary examination in the Police 
Court goes. And they may, with equal professional pro- 
priety, take the same stand when Mrs. Davidson is brought 
to trial in the Superior Court. By following this technical 
course Dr. Brown's attorneys will probably land Mrs. 
Davidson in San Quentin, but where will Dr. Brown be 
left? Where is he now? He set out to clear his character 
by causing the arrest of Mrs. Davidson. Then he insisted, 
through his attorneys, that as to the matter of her guilt 
or innocence of the charge of blackmail, "it makes no differ- 
ence if Dr. Brown had improper relations with every 
woman in his congregation !" 

Suppose Dr. Brown to be what his congregation thought 
him, a pure man terrified by a bad woman into paying 
hush-money rather than be the subject of a lying scandal, 
would he not at the first opportunity endeavor to prove 
his innocence ? It was taken for granted that that was 
what Dr. Brown had Mrs. Davidson seized by the police 
for — that not the punishment of an obscure old woman, 
but his own vindication was his object. But immediately 
upon Mrs. Davidson's arrest things began to happen — the 
revelations as to the character of Miss Mattie Overman; 
the shelter of that person in Dr. Brown's own house; the 
retort of Mrs. Stockton to the affidavit of a disappeared 
lawyer that she had made indelicate advances to Dr. 
Brown; the statements by Mrs. Thurston and the Aliens; 
the letters of Miss Overman to her friend, Mrs. Tunnell, 
disclosing her guilty relations with her pastor. Dr. Brown, 
when he arrested Mrs. Davidson, evidently was not pre- 
pared for this rain of accusations, of confirmation. In 
dragging Mrs. Davidson from her berth he awoke the 
whole sleeping-car. His retreat behind his attorneys and 
the intrenchments of technical law is understood. 

There is speculation as to whether Dr. Brown will re- 
sign his pastorate or not. We do not think the First 
Congregational Church will permit him to resign. Our 
reason for so thinking is the assumption that the First 
Congregational Church is composed of decent people. If 
half of what is alleged against Dr. Brown be true, he is a 
lying, lecherous, hypocritical villain, whom to turn loose 
without branding would be a crime. We believe the 
church, which has been humiliated and disgraced, will see 
to it that he gets a fair trial before a court of its own, 
where the technicalities of secular tribunals will not be 
recognized, and that if found guilty he will be cast out with 
the mark of infamy upon him, so that it will be next to 
impossible for him to go anywhere else in the" world and 
get a pulpit. Other clergymen have been guilty of con- 
duct like that of Dr. Brown's, and yet have gone, under 
assumed names, to remote towns and villages and resumed 
their trade of preaching the gospel and their diversion of 
breaking the commandments. But Dr. Brown, if expelled 
by the First Congregational Church of San Francisco, will 
hardly be able to do this. His prominence as pastor of 
one of this city's leading churches, has given a national 
publicity to the scandal of which he is the degraded cen- 
tral figure. His portrait has been printed in every im- 
portant newspaper of the United States. His face is in 
the rogues' gallery. 

Churches always show loyalty to accused pastors, and 
arc slow to believe ill of them. This loyalty often goes ex- 
traordinary lengths and provokes the jeers of the worldly, 
but the sentiment which evokes the loyalty is unselfish and 
admirable, and deserves the respect of every good man 
and woman. But when a pastor in whom a church has 
trusted drags himself and it with him into the mire, in the 
sight of the world, that church becomes stern and right- 
eously resentful. It deals with him as an enemy of re- 
ligion—the worst enemy. The people of the First Congre- 
gational Church arc not, we should say, of the intellectual 
grade who will trust blindly in spite of damning evidence. 
They once before had an experience which teaches them 
that a man may preach well and seem to be earnest in his 
work, and yet in his private life be-an abandoned scoun- 
drel. Hence we believe the Rev. Dr. Brown will not be 
allowed to resign and slink off into the void, but that he 



will be tried by his church and compelled to bear the con- 
sequences of his acts, if they have been of the kind im- 
puted to him by so many witnesses. 

The Leaven The News Letter is pleased to note that 
of a its suggestions as to the need of a Society 

New Idea, for the Protection of Preachers are already 
bearing fruit. It is announced that a num- 
ber of Oakland clergymen have taken steps to protect 
themselves from temptation and the wiles of blackmailers. 
The Rev. Marshall Law, according to the public prints, 
will henceforth receive no woman parishioner in the study 
at his church, unless she be accompanied by a male rela- 
tive as a guarantee of strictly honorable intentions, and as 
a safeguard against scandal. The Rev. S. S. Palmer goes 
still farther in preventive measures, for he has closed his 
study in the church, and will from this time greet lady 
visitors at his home only, where Mrs. Palmer will be with- 
in call, and may at all times keep a watchful eye on sus- 
pects. From the observance of these precautions, it is 
but a step to the inception of the organization recom- 
mended and suggested by this journal. Ministers are but 
men, and the growing aggressiveness of what was once 
known as the weaker sex may well be regarded by the 
clergy with solicitude and alarm. Matrimony, it was at 
one time fondly believed, furnished a safeguard not only 
for clerical virtue but also against the tongue of scandal. 
But it now appears that even uxorious watchfulness and 
restraint is not always sufficient, either to keep ministerial 
footsteps within the safe and narrow path or to exclude 
meretricious attractions from their gaze. It is too much 
•to expect that the wives of pastors shall be constantly on 
guard, and such extreme degree of conjugal care and 
espionage might awaken restlessness and a roving spirit 
in the most tranquil ministerial bosom. Hence arises the 
need of that organized care and guardianship; that sort of 
spiritual protectorate and moral suzerainty which has 
been advocated in these columns for the benefit of 
preachers. Whether the New Woman or the Old Woman 
is best fitted to grapple with this problem may be a ques- 
tion. It is not a thing to be treated lightly, but a real 
need of the hour. The clergy, as a body, must not be 
permitted or forced to retire entirely from intercourse 
with their fellow women, merely because the voice of 
scandal has been raised in the land. It may be that a 
plurality of wives for preachers, by multiplying the safe- 
guards and the watchfulness, would be effective in one 
way, but there are insurmountable prejudices against a 
resort to this expedient. It appears to be well settled 
that clergymen must marry and must be monogamous, no 
matter how strongly a polyandrous inclination may be 
manifested among the weaker sisters of the flock, or 
among the tribe of New Women with advanced ideas and 
retrograde morals. 

The Funding Bill Almost every material interest in this 
in State is bound up, directly or indi- 

Congress. rectly, with the existence and success- 

ful operation of the great transconti- 
nental railroad terminating in this city. To tie it up with 
foreclosure proceedings, or any other form of litigation, 
would be to paralyze every industry in the State. It is 
not thinkable that any wise or even thoughtful business 
men, not actuated by spiteful or malicious motives, can de- 
sire any suspension of, or serious interference with, the 
business of that road. It therefore goes without saying 
that no sane or fair-minded man can approve the extreme 
courses urged by Mayor Sutro and his committee of fifty. 
According to them the railroad, which is the helper and 
handmaid of almost every successful enterprise known to 
our coast, is to be ruthlessly treated as a public enemy, 
and brought to a condition of suspended animation. Whilst 
foreclosure procedures are had and new owners found 
ready and able to operate the road as it is now being 
operated, the iron horse must needs be tied up in the round 
house. For a time, at least — for litigation cannot be ended 
in an hour — traffic must be impeded, if not altogether sus- 
pended, and doubt and uncertainty attend every enter- 
prise. And all this for what ? Because the railroad is 
about to owe the Government a debt which it cannot for the 
moment pay. No railroad in this country or any other 



January 1 1, i 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



irned and paid off it- within the 

. quarter of a century. It would not inure 

ipmeol of the country if m< much 

: freights thai only yield enough 

to pay into pita are complained of aa being high, 

what said if they were raised bo as t>> yield the 

principal as well as int. -rest ? The burden simply could 

not In- borne, and that being so. the country under such a 

m would have been obliged to wait many long years 

- railroads, and its development would probably have 

put back a hundred years or more. The time to pav 

off principal is when the country, by the aid of the railroad, 
flieiently tilled up to render the payment possible! 
rity, that will likely have even more use for the rail 
roads than we have, may well share the cost of their hav- 
en provided. This generation is. in all conscience, 
doing enough. It is paying the cost of the Civil War and 
a vast sum in pensions. Moreover, it is paying interest 
on six billions ($6,000,000,000) of bonded indebtedness, in- 
curred in giving the United States as many miles of rail- 
road as are to be found in all the rest of the world put to- 
gether. Without that expenditure this country could not 
be what it is to-day. Indeed, its unity could not have been 
preserved if its different parts had not been brought to- 
gether in the manner they have. Who will say that that 
vast railroad indebtedness should be paid off at this time? 
The idea is absurd because of its impracticability. No one 
would care to seriously argue such a proposition. Yet it 
is on all fours with the proposal to require the Central Pa- 
cific to pay off the cost of its construction before it has 
had time to earn the money. What it is reasonable to re- 
quire it to do might with equal justice be demanded by the 
creditors of all other roads. Why should the builders of 
the Central Pacific be treated with exceptional harshness? 
And why should the Pacific coast, which has benefited 
most by the railroad, be disinclined to grant an extension 
of time when nearly all the rest of the country acquiesces in 
its being granted?" Besides, what better can be done? It 
is said that the Government can take the road and operate 
it. Who except a few cranks on this side of the continent 
believes that? How, when, and where has this Govern- 
ment, with its uncertain civil service, spoils system, and 
change of administrations, shown a capacity to handle such 
multifarious business interests as are involved in the man- 
agement of this great railroad? Before so new and seri- 
ous a departure as Government ownership is taken, the 
endorsement of the whole eountry should be obtained. Is 
it not safer and better, under proper conditions, to grant 
an extention of time? 



The Wolves San Francisco is not the only hunting 
and the ground of blackmailers who aim at minis- 
Shepherds, terial victims. A flagrant case has just 
come to light in New York, where the 
Rev. Aris Lichtenstein was the object of attack. The rev- 
erend gentleman is a Jew by birth, but some years ago be- 
came a convert to Christianity, and has since filled the 
pulpit of the Mariners' Temple, in New York. Not long 
ago he was decoyed to Philadelphia by a message to the 
effect that his sister was there seriously ill; but upon his 
arrival in the Quaker City he learned that she was in her 
usual good health. Later in the day a demand was made 
upon him for $5,000 by a young man unknown to him, who 
declared that the preacher would be put to a great deal 
of trouble if he did not comply. Subsequently a young 
woman appeared, who told Mr. Lichtenstein that he was 
the father of her child. This was news to the reverend 
gentlemau, who had left a wife and children at his home in 
New York. He was at a loss what to do, but temporized 
with the blackmailers, and returned to New York, where 
he communicated with the police. Acting upon their ad- 
vice, when an agent of the blackmailers next appeared, 
the preacher made an appointment, and some hours 
later he paid to three men a number of bank 
notes whose numbers had been noted by the po- 
lice. Then officers who had been in concealment pounced 
upon the blackmailers, and they were lodged in jail. 
The reverend gentleman thinks that there were fully 
ten persons concerned in the plot against him. The moral 
of this occurrence is that persons called upon by black- 
mailers would do well to put themselves in communication 



' eforc paying any do etting any 

ip f..r the schemer*. The affaii . that 

man. who has ni ] D0 | 

ittacks of this character. Hut the inn.., cut and the 

guilty should alike beware of setting secret traps for 
blackmailers, lest the result be to catch their own 
The time to call in the police is before, and not after, the 
payment of hush money 

Labor Its Ell is not the first agitator who 

Own has been transformed int.. a philosopher by a 

Oppressor, term Of imprisonment. He who threw the 

whole country into commotion by leading the 
great railroad strike of 1894 now announces 'thai be has 
had enough of strikes, and advises the workingmen to go 

into politics for the relief of grievances. " 1 will," hesavs. 

1 never hereafter accept any position in a labor organiz- 
ation; I will under no circumstances, be allied with any 
trades union. 1 expect lo work for all labor, and urge the 
necessity of workingmen seeking their emancipation 
by the ballot. " To this end Debs will publish a paper. 
Just how the workingmen are to emancipate themselves 
he frankly confesses that he does not know, but he leans 
strongly to the belief that it will be through socialism. 

Though Debs has turned philosopher, it has not yet 
broken upon him even dimly why it is that the working- 
men, who could be omnipotent at the polls because of their 
numbers, are so feeble there. The reason is that the 
workingmen mistake their position utterly in the United 
States. They have fallen under the illusion that they are 
oppressed by others, when, as a matter of fact, they are 
their own oppressors. If they would free themselves from 
the notion that they are victims of a designing miuority, 
and realize that they are equal citizens of the republic,' 
who have the power to correct unjust social conditions! 
they would be on the right road. But they prefer to con- 
sider themselves as a class apart, with special rights, 
including that of levying domestic war for the increase of 
their wages; and, so long as that continues to be the case, 
they will remain hostile in interest to every other class of 
citizens, who, in self-defense, will band against them. 

It is want of brains that keeps the workingman down. 
He is too vain to admit this, and call in to his help men of 
better intellect than himself. Until he ceases to be sus- 
picious of sympathizers who do not possess the supreme 
virtue of working with their hands for a living, he will stay 
where he is— at r.he bottom of the heap. Intelligence will 
continue to rule whether the workingman likes it or not, 
and intelligence knows that the worst thing which could 
happen for labor, and everybody else, would be to let labor, 
in its present stage of mental development, get on top. A 
class of men who admit that they do not know how to use 
the ballot for their own bettermeut thereby confess that 
they are unfit to be trusted with political power. To 
make friends with intelligence, not to be at surly and 
threatening enmity with it, that is the true and only path 
open to labor. Its " emancipation " lies with itself. We 
commend this thought to Mr. Debs for consideration in the 
paper he is to publish for the enlightenment of the world. 

Letting Down It is reported that all of the class of sixty- 
the four law students, who recently under- 

Legal Bars, went " examination " at the hands of the 
Supreme Court Commissioners, were ad- 
mitted to practice. If this be correct, it appears that the 
change authorized by the last Legislature, by which the 
Justices have turned over the periodical "examination " to 
the Commissioners, is not of a character to raise the stand- 
ard of legal acquirements. The practical working of the 
new method seems to be to let down the bars to all-comers. 
It is scarcely conceivable that in a class of sixty-four ap- 
plicants, all could be found qualified for the practice of 
law. Of late years the number of lawyers has so greatly 
multiplied in this city, through the medium of the law 
colleges, that the wonder is how such a multitude contrive 
to eke out a living. Perhaps the increase is not actually 
so large as might appear from the results of the 
periodical examinations, as it is probable that a large 
proportion of those licensed to wrangle at the bar 
ultimately take up blacksmithing or some other useful 
handicraft, or engage in commercial business. At all 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January n, 1896. 



events it is safe to say that the majority of attorneys in 
San Francisco, capable or otherwise, earn no such income 
as the fancy of youthful aspirants to forensic honors paints 
in glowing- colors. The abundant pecuniary success of a 
score or two of prominent lawyers is by no means the 
real standard of professional income. But whenever the 
newspaper print a story of large fees paid in some im- 
portant case, involving great pecuniary interests, the am- 
bition of a hundred young men is fired with the desire to 
likewise win fame and fortune at the bar. At the present 
time, it is no doubt safe to say that the best advice to 
those about to study law is that proverbially offered by 
Punch to those about to marry — " Don't. " If fitness and 
a creditable desire to master the iutricaciesof the law were 
allowed to regulate the supply of attorneys and counsellors, 
the profession would never be overcrowded, and it would 
be to a great extent relieved from the too-common bad 
practices which have of late years steadily lowered its 
standing in this community. The growth of the commer- 
cial spirit in this calling, once justly honored as of the 
noblest to which the intellect of man could devote itself, is 
as conspicuous as it is deplorable. Not the best lawyer, 
but the most crafty business man, is he who wins, as a 
rule, the greatest pecuniary rewards in law practice. 
What San Francisco needs, and the whole State, for that 
matter, is not more lawyers or other professional men, but 
more manufacturers and producers; more men who create 
business and furnish employment for labor, and fewer of 
the classes who strive to win a more or less precarious 
support by their wits. 

Will He Never It was hoped when the new School 
Cease Board was elected, more than a year 

From Troubling? ago, that ex-President Hyde had 
ceased to vex the School Department 
with his arbitrary and dictatorial meddling. But he is one 
of those men who seem never to know when to retire 
gracefully from a public station. He had made himself so 
generally and so cordially detested by the teachers and 
their friends that his re-election would have been an im- 
possibility, under any circumstances, and a less thick- 
skinned man would have been content to leave the schools 
to the direction and control of the new administration of 
the department. But Mr. Hyde's invincible desire 
to rule had to be gratified in some way. So, as Superin- 
tendent Babcock has explained, he wined and dined the 
late Grand Jury, and so cajoled them into the adoption of 
certain recommendations relative to the conduct of School 
Board matters. In these recommendations the hand of 
their author is unmistakably revealed. It seems not to 
have occurred to Mr. Hyde that the province of the Grand 
Jury is not to lay down rules for the guidance of the School 
Board. The Grand Jury might with equal propriety 
undertake to tell the Board of Supervisors how to transact 
their business, or formulate a system of rules for the 
Mayor in the affairs of his office. As Superintendent Bab- 
cock and Director Hawley have shown, the preseut School 
Board compares very favorably in respect to economy and 
efficiency with the board bossed by Mr. Hyde. In fact, 
the Superintendent, who is in a position to judge, declares 
that the present is a much superior body to that which re- 
volved about ex-President Hyde. The charge of the 
Grand Jury, that the present board has raised the salaries 
of substitute teachers, is certainly not of a very grave 
character, in view of the general sentiment that the 
teachers should be well paid, but it is altogether lacking 
in fact. The new Board has merely restored some salaries 
that the Hyde-bound Board had unjustly and unreason- 
ably cut down. The present Board has by resolution 
called upon the new Grand Jury for a hearing in relation to 
the criticisms which the last Grand Jury was deceived into 
adopting, and, while the subject seems to be outside the 
proper limit of the investigations of this inquisitorial body, 
it is no more than fair, in view of the circumstances, that 
the request be granted and the whole matter fully ex- 
plained. 

Keen Interest Not for many years have foreign affairs 

in excited so large a degree of attention 

Foreign Affairs, in America as at the present time. The 

Nicaragua question, the dispute about 

the Alasakan boundary, and the grave difficulty that has 



arisen over the Venezuelan matter are of themselves 
sufficient to occupy no small share of the thoughts of our 
people. But these are, for the time being, at least, cast 
in the background by the progress of the Cuban rebellion 
and the serious prospect of war between European powers 
because of the disturbances in the Transvaal. The 
prophets of peace, who, a few years ago, seemed to have 
things all their own way, now stand aghast at the fierce 
spirit that has blazed out between England and Germany. 
It is clear that a very little thing would suffice to provoke 
war between these two great powers — two of the most 
Christian nations, alike distinguished for progress in the 
arts and sciences, in philosophy and literature. After all 
civilization is but a thin veneer, spread over the inherent 
savagery and ferocity of human nature. The brutal in- 
stincts of humanity crop out more conspicuously and with 
less restraint in the intercourse and the quarrels of nations 
than in the private dealings of individuals. The ruling 
class of Englishmen, as individuals, would not be guilty of 
the crimes against liberty which have disgraced the 
Government of Great Britain from the earliest times down 
to the present day. Her claims in Africa, and especially 
her assumption of a so-called protectorate over the Boers, 
are not founded upon any natural right, but merely upon 
military achievement. It is true that the Transvaal 
republic acknowledged, by treaty, the assertion of British 
authority, but it is justly claimed that the armed invasion 
by Dr. Jameson and his following of filibusters has 
abrogated all treaty rights. 

Naturally, the people of this country sympathize with 
the Cubans in their struggle for independence, and with 
the Boers in their manful and stalwart determination to 
resist British encroachment. What the English have 
attempted in the Transvaal they would do to-morrow in 
Venezuela, were it not for the certainty that the United 
States would come to the rescue of the republic whose 
soil would thus be invaded. While in Europe there is no 
international doctrine corresponding to that formulated 
by President Monroe, there is a keen international 
jealousy which likewise serves to protect the weak from 
invasion or attack. Thus Germany is quick to resent the 
inexcusable invasion of the Boers' territory by an armed 
force of Englishmen. The German Emperor evidently be- 
lieves, despite official disavowals from the British authori- 
ties, that some secret understanding prompted Jameson's 
march toward Johannesberg. The situation looks threat- 
ening, and perhaps England has not much reason to hope 
that Germany will allow her to gracefully retire from an 
awkward dilemma. When England's pride is thoroughly 
aroused, there is small room to doubt that she will prefer 
fight to national humiliation, no matter what the cost. 
But many a serious diplomatic complication in Europe has 
been relieved ere this without bloodshed, and it is not un- 
likely that this whole trouble in the Transvaal will blow 
over without warfare between the great nations 
concerned. 

Polygamy in It is remarked in some quarters that 
Utah State, the nation has taken Utah at her word 
in admitting her as a State on her 
promise that polygamy shall never again be pei-mitted 
within her borders. The Examiner declares that while 
the constitution of the new State prohibits plural 
marriages, the people of Utah may by amendment strike 
out this provision at any time. But it is to be remembered 
that the prohibition of polygamy, irrevocably, was re- 
quired by the Act of Congress in accordance with which 
Utah was admitted to the Union, and is also one of the 
conditions of admission expressed in the proclamation of 
President Cleveland declaring Utah to be a State. While 
no such question has, perhaps, ever before arisen in this 
country, it seems highly probable that the Supreme Court 
of the United States would hold the prohibition of poly- 
gamy to be an element of the contract or covenant into 
which the people of Utah have entered, and that any 
amendment to the State constitution, removing this pro- 
hibition, would be null and void. It is not to be supposed 
that a Territory may obtain admission to the Union upon 
certain express terms, and subsequently, at pleasure, 
avoid the conditions of the compact. 



Janu.'. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 










- — -- 



1 really very happy 



i on this N. w 

u the tin horn p. 

! a profit of four 

foundatioi ir for- 

1 Trinity was blocked by 

mense throng, nun :ome in from out 

be Ni w Year's chimes, but, alas! it 

ittle they heard of tin- chimes, so deafening was the 

of the till trumpets, .mil I fancy the bell ringer is the 

only person who can conscientiously say that he heard the 

lovely music. Old Trinity was very beautiful and pictur- 

ian, cold moonlight, and even the tombstones 

were lighted up cheerfully in the old churchyard where the 

- of Manhattan have slumbered so long. 
It was curious to notice last night how all the crowd gazed 
up at the belfry tower, as if they could hear the music 
with their eyes. Tin- chimes rang "Evening Bells, a 
selection from "Oberon," " Massa 's in the Cold. Cold 
Ground." which the multitude supplemented with a vocal 
chorus, " Happy New Year to all,'' and half a dozen other 
selections. Dp in Grace Church tower the chimes were 
unt,'. and there the music was of a less secular char- 
acter than at Trinity. At St. Andrew's, in Harlem, there 
were more chimes and more people, and a spirit of gayety 
pervaded the city. 

" Punch bowls," as New Year's eve parties are now 
called, were very much a feature last night, and as for the 
theatres you simply could not get inside the doors. To-day 
an old custom is being revived at the City Hall, where the 
Mayor and the City Fathers will receive from noon uutil 
four o'clock. Several artists have announced their inten- 
tion of spending an old-time New Year's and keeping "open 
house," and one of your Californian dames, Mrs. Harry 
Gillig. is doing the same thing quite informally to-day. It 
is a pity that such a pretty custom should ever have fallen 
into disuse, although it was surely impossible to continue 
it once it became so sadly abused. 

The Music H ill managers had a nervous shock early in 
the week when the order was sent out from police head- 
quarters that no more intoxicating drinks should he served 
in places of amusement. This was a hard hit at Koster & 
Bial's, the Olympia, the Imperial, Miner's Bowery Theatre 
and that mild place of amusement, the Eden Musee. A 
test case was made at once, and a mighty sigh of relief 
rose to the clouds when the judicial decision was sent forth 
that the law forbidding such sales was 
a dead letter. I suppose the next 
thing to be organized here will be the 
formation of a County Council, such as 
exists in London, to enforce what an 
individual I know insists on calling the 
"exercise law." 

I have several times lately run 
across Jack Klein — "Klein of Samoa," 
who is now a valued member of the 
Herald staff. He is as full of energy 
and brain as ever, and apparently de- 
voted to his work. Charles F. Bran- 
denstcin and L. Levy, of San Fran- 
cisco, have been guests at the Wind- 
sor this week, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Osborne, of Los Angeles, are 
at the Holland. Mrs. Sime, who has 
been at the Empire ever since her re- 
turn from New London, intends start- 
ing for California within a few weeks 
on a visit to her sons. 

The sensation of the day is the Bur- 
den diamond robbery. Mrs. Burden 
is a leader in New York society, and 
is a beautiful and brilliant woman. 
Mrs. Burden is a cousin of Henry 
Burden McDowell, whose mother was 
a Miss Burden. The family fortunes 



den Iron V, 

week of investigation the 

the thief or thievi - Vt 

' .int. but it is cruel to 

rj fl'e 

■ . anil it is said that the departure of 

lnsp, i tor Byrnes has given courage to many sneak thieves 
iw" during ; 
■r 11 P. Noyes has just arrived in New Yorl 
has abandoned bis idea of a European trip for this year. 

Mr ;niil Mrs. Kesick, Of Yokohama, both* well known in 

are at the Windsor with their children, 
maid, governess, and the baby's ayah, who is a source of 
intense interest and excitement all along the Avenue when 

ever she tal.es her baby for an airing. 

A. disastrous fire occurred last night in Westche 

when tin' di Zerega homestead, with all ils valuable 
paintings and tapestries, was destroyed, five paintings 
worth live thousand dollars each being consumed. The 
di Zeregas are an old and honored family here, some of 
whose members have visited California.' One of them, 
Lady lYankland. was. 1 think, in California on her mar- 
riage journey. Passk-Pahtoit. 
New I'"/-/.-. January 1. 1896. 

HOW AN ORIOLE MURDERED HER FAMILY. 

IT has been claimed by observers that some of the 
feathered tribe will feed their young if they are caged, 
and if they fail after a certain time to release them they 
will bring them a poisoned weed to eat that death may 
end their captivity. About a week ago, at the Holstein 
ranch, says the Carson Appeal, the children captured a 
nest of three young orioles, and they were immediately 
caged and hung in a tree. The mother was soon about, 
calling her young, and in a little while brought them some 
worms. She continued feeding them regularly for some 
days without seeming to pay much attention to persons 
about. But on Sunday came the tragic ending that 
demonstrated the theory relative to birds. She brought 
them a sprig of green on Sunday morning and disappeared. 
In less than an hour they all died. The sprig was examined 
and proved to be the deadly larkspur, a weed that will 
kill full grown cattle. The little creatures lay dead in the 
cage and slightly foaming at the mouth, victims of their 
mother's stern resolve that her offspring should die by 
her own act rather than live in captivity. 

" How did you get Borely out of your whist club — did 
you ask him to resign? " "No; we didn't like to do that, 
but we all resigned except Borely, and then we all got to- 
gether and formed a new club? " — Harper's Bazar. 



germ=life 

The doctors tell us, now-a-days, that disease germs 
are everywhere; in the air, in the water, in our food, 
clothes, money ; that they get into our bodies, live 
there, thrive and grow, if they find anything to thrive on. 

Consumption is the destruction of lung-tissue by 
germs where the lung is too weak to conquer them. 
The remedy is strength — vital force. 

Scott's Emulsion, with hypophosphites, means the 
adjustment of lung strength to overcome germ-life. 



It is nerhtiner the 



with the odds in our favor. 



These tiny little drops of fat-food make their way 
into the system and re-fresh and re-invigorate it. 
Whether you succeed with it or not depends on how 
good a start the germs had, and how carefully you can 
live. The shortest way to health is the patient one. 
The erain is often slow. 



SO cents and $ 1 .00 



SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists, 



New York 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January n, 1896. 



lift 



\'i flKi 



siiiR? 





or 



SIMMONS was an excessive and unnecessary American. 
That was the unanimous verdict which his fellow 
artists passed upon him when he made his first appear- 
ance in Paris. 

" Probably you don't believe in ghosts," said Simmons. 
But if you'd known as many ghosts as I've known, you'd 
understand that ghosts are as common as cats, and pretty 
near as intelligent. 

" Two years ago I was paiutiug in Venice, which I con- 
sider the meanest town on this side of the Atlantic, and I 
can't say worse than that. It's ruinous and dirty, and in- 
convenient, and yon can't get anything fit to eat in the 
whole place. It has the biggest ghost population of any 
city in the world, though the general public doesn't know 
it. You see, the cemetery is mighty uncomfortable, there 
being at least a foot of water in every grave, and the con- 
sequence is that most of the people that are buried in 
Venice prefer to become ghosts and wander around the 
town, where they can manage to keep dry. I was wanting 
to paint a picture on the Northern Lagoon, and one day 
when I was looking for a good place to set up my easel, I 
saw a house standing just on the edge of the water, that 
looked as if it had been shut up since the time of Julius 
Caisar. I saw that if I had a room in that house I could 
paint my picture without any interruption, and so I made 
inquiries about it. Well, I found somebody who professed 
to be the agent of the owner of the house, and I rented a 
room for three francs a month. 

"I soon found that the house was a regular ghost bar- 
rack. They didn't show themselves, but they made a lot 
of noise. There wasn't any lock to my room, and the first 
night I slept in it the ghosts opened the door, and let in a 
current of air that gave me a cold; so I put a cheap lock 
on the door, which kept out the ghosts, though any ordinary 
burglar could have opened it with a nail. Sometimes the 
ghosts would come into my room while I was at work; but 
beyond making the furniture creak, and occasionally 
knocking something off the table— for they are a careless 
lot — they didn't disturb me in the daytime. But at night 
there seemed to be whole gangs of them going up and 
down stairs, and holding political meetings and women's 
rights conventions in the next room. Every now and then 
I used to get up and go out on the landing and ask them 
to remember that they were keeping an inoffensive 
foreigner awake. 

" One day I went to the bank to draw some money that 
was coming to me from America, and to cash a draft for a 
picture that I had sold to au English tourist. Altogether 
it made a good bit of money, and the banker paid it to me 
in gold, because I never trust any of this foreign paper 
money. It filled a small bag, and as it was too heavy for 
me to carry in my pocket, I carried it in my hand, though 
the banker warned me that I was putting temptation in 
the way of the poor, and trifling with the feelings of the 
criminal classes. I had my dinner at a restaurant, and 
afterwards spent most of the evening at a cafe in the 
Piazza, where I used to go to read the papers. About 
nine o'clock I heard thunder, aud, not having any umbrella, 
started in a hurry for my room. 

"The storm came up more slowly than I had expected, 
but soon after I had gone to bed it arrived, and gave a 
first-class exhibition of what Venice can do in the line of 
thunderstorms when she gives her whole mind to it. It 
rained as if the water had been emptied out of a thousand 



washtubs; the lightning was so sharp that it half blinded 
me, and the thunder shook the whole house from top to 
bottom. As for the wind, it howled worse than a London 
milkman; and as there was too much noise for sleeping, I 
just lay in bed and amused myself watching the lightning. 
All at once I saw something that I don't mind admitting 
gave me a start. I told you that King Arthur, as I used 
to call my suit of armour, always stood in a corner of the 
room. Well, I happened to be looking in that direction, 
when a flash of lightning showed me that King Arthur 
had moved about two feet away from the corner, and was 
standing perfectly still in his new position. I didn't mind 
ordinary ghosts; but when it came to a suit of armour 
waltzing around a room by itself, I didn't like the look of 
it. I lay there in the dark, trying to persuade myself that 
I had been mistaken in thinking that I had seen the 
armour standing in the corner when I went to bed, and 
saying to myself that the woman who took care of the 
room must have moved it. I knew all the time that this 
wasn't true; but when a man is fool enough to be frightened 
at a ghost, he is always fool enough to believe any 
moderate lie. But by-and-by there came another flash, 
and I saw that the figure had moved a couple of feet 
farther along the wall, and had one hand stretched out, 
as if it was feeling its way in the darkness. Now I knew 
what was the matter. Some ghost had got into that suit 
of armour, and was walking around in it. 

"Probably the ghost that was inside of the armour 
found it difficult to walk in such a heavy suit of clothes. 
At any rate, he moved about as slow as a district 
messenger boy; and if you know anything about district 
messenger boys in London, you know how slow that is. 
The next flash showed that the figure had left the wall 
along which it had been sliding, aud was coming straight 
towards the bed. ft was only about fifteen feet from me, 
and my heart began to beat at the rate of about a hundred 
and fifty to the minute. 

"However, my fright didn't last many minutes. I re- 
flected that a weak ghost in a heavy suit of armour would 
be about as useless for fighting purposes as a professional 
pugilist who is in the habit of writing to the newspapers. 
I made up my mind that I would wait till the figure was 
close to my bed, and that I would then jump on it and up- 
set it on the floor, the chances being that I would have 
plenty of time to find the matches before the figure could 
get on its legs again. I gathered myself together for a 
spring, and waited till — according to my calculation — King 
Arthur was within striking distance. Then I threw back 
the bedclothes, and made a jump for my visitor. I struck 
him good and square, and we both came down with as 
much rattle and clatter and bang as if we had been a 
dozen lengths of stove pipe. 

" I stood for a moment wondering what I had better do 
with my visitor, just to teach him a useful lesson, when I 
happened to think of a stick of solder that I had bought 
one day when I wanted to mend several cracks in the 
breastplate of King Arthur. I lit my spirit lamp, heated 
my soldering-iron, and laying King Arthur in a handy 
position on his back, began to solder the different pieces 
of his armour together. I soldered his front and back 
plates till nothing less than a cold chisel could have un- 
buttoued them; I soldered his helmet tight to his shoulders, 
and I soldered his leg-pieces from the hip down to the foot. 
I worked over the job for a full hour, and when I had got 
through I had made him pretty near watertight. 

" ' Now, my ghostly friend,' I said, ' this will teach you 
not to come into a gentleman's bedroom and take liberties 
with his curiosities. You've put yourself into that suit of 
armour without leave, and you'll stay in it till I'm ready 
to let you out, which won't be for some time. I'll just tie 
your legs to the bedpost, so that you can't shuffle away 
before morning, and then I'll make up some of the sleep 



' 



SAN FRANCISCO M \VS l.i i 



I 



irived in.- of n-Uli you. 

I tied the :i.-.,i ,„| tbea 

the I'utidli t to Imh] 

tlu' m-'iiii:,; u »,,. .ml the 

over the side i 
King Arthur was getting on, and I never was more 
siirpri-od in my life than I was to lind that In- had gone. 
I jumped up and • i. that being tin- only 

of concealment in the nx>in. but my friend wasnM 
there. The door was locked as usual, and the key was 
under my pillow. It was clear that King Arthur must 
bave gone out by way of the window, ami then I noticed 
that one of the front windows that looked out on the lagoon 
was partly open. T went and looked out of it. but there 
was no figure in armour in sight The tide was unusually 
high— higher, in fact, than I had ever seen it before 
a soul was stirring at that early hour, and after wonder- 
ing what could possibly have become of my suit of armour 
and its wearer. 1 went back to lied for another nap." 

Simmons paused for a moment, and we all thought that 
he had Blushed bis story. I was just about to ask him what 
his explanation of the walking suit of armour was. when 
:med. 

"Do any of you fellows read Italian '.' " 

We all assured him that we did not. 

" Then." said he. taking a newspaper cutting from his 
pocket-book. "I'll translate a little paragraph that ap- 
peared in the Adriatico — the Venetian paper — ten days or 
so after my experience with King Arthur. Listen to 
this: — "Yesterday morning two fishermen, Carlo Farbis 
and Antonio Scamozzi, made a discovery of the most 
horrible in the Canal of Burano. Seeing something shining 
under the water at low tide, they arrived to bring it to 
the surface. It was a complete suit of armour of the 
fifteenth century. In addition to being fastened in the 
usual way, the armour was soldered together, and when 
the fishermen had prized the visor of the helmet open, they 
were filled with horror to find that the corpse of a man, in 
an advanced state of decomposition, was enclosed in the 
armour. Evidently one treats of an atrocious murder, 
and the police are soon to make an important arrest.' " 

We all agreed that Simmons's adventure was a remark- 
able one, and nobody ventured to express any doubts as to 
its literal truth. Simmons was hardly the sort of man 
with whom to discuss a question of veracity. But after 
Simmons had gone home, and left us still at the dinner- 
table, the man who bad been sitting next to him picked 
up from the floor the newspaper cutting which Simmons 
had translated. It had been cut from Galignani's 
Messenger, and not from an italian paper; and instead of 
referring to a gruesome discovery by Venetian fishermen, 
it simply contained the hours of the departure of trains 
from Paris to London. 



THE COST OF TUNNELS. 



IN comparing the four great tunnels of the world there 
is seen to be a very remarkable decrease in time and 
cost of the successive works. The Hoosac tunnel, the 
oldest of the four, cost $379 a foot; the Mont Cenis, 
the next in date, cost $356 a foot; the St. Gothard 
cost $229 a foot; and the Arlberg, the latest in date, 
cost only 154 dol. a foot. This rapid decrease in cost, 
within comparatively few years, is a marked indication of 
the great progress in mechanical methods and improve- 
ment in rock-excavating tools. A still more striking 
result exists in the case of a tunnel through the Cascade, 
on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. This, unlike 
those named, which were excavated in old settled countries, 
the terminal easy of access, was in a peculiarly difficult 
location, so much so that it took six months to convey the 
machinery to the spot. Rivers had to be turned aside, 
bridges built, and material transported over improvised 
roads through nearly one hundred miles of forest, mud, 
and snow-fields, yet the tunnel, which is 16J feet wide, 22 
feet high, and 8,950 feet long, was bored through the 
mountains in twenty-two months, at the rate of 413 feet a 
month, and a cost of the completed tunnel of only $118 
a foot. — Information. 



The Japanese Art Goods and fine cloisonne ware at Gen. T. 
Marsh & Co.'s, under the Palace Hotel, surpass all else in that Hue. 



loiwKj|Smokelespowler 



MMH i 



The Boss of all SMOKELESS POWDERS 

Manufactured. 

Used by the Grack shots of tlie country. 

Lowest recorded breech PRESSURE. 
Lightest RECOIL and absolutely no SMOKE. 

Manufactured by 

THE GIANT POWDER CO., Consolidated, 

430 California St., S. F. 



ADOLPH NOHllMAN. 



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Standard Optical Go. 



Manufacturers and 
Importers of 



OPTICAL GOODS 



121 POST STREET, S. F. 



Alt kinds of complicated lenses ground to order. 

Glasses scientifically adjusted and defective sight 
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Oculists' prescriptions carefully attended to. 



ON WHEELS. 



G. &S. 



AXLE, GREASE,. 



HOME PRODUCTION. 

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Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all flrst-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 1 1, 1896. 





We Obey No Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



TT is a poor season that does not bring us 
1 several editions of that superb tragedy 
by James Sheridan Knowles. Virginius. Its 
subtle blending of the tragic aud the poetic, 
the- delicate fancy of its sentiment and the 
^fe* rugged potency of its awful strife have 
long ago given it a place among the classics. Louis James, 
one of the most versatile of American tragedians, chose 
this old favorite for the opening of his engagement at the 
California. The performance, while not developing any 
special distinction for the supporting company, was inter- 
esting and even, and staged with taste and discretion. 
Mr. James' portrayal of Virginius was st rong and con- 
scientious. He invested Virginius with all the devoted 
tenderness that the Roman felt for his motherless girl, 
displaying a deeply human emotion and caressing gentle- 
ness that have not been so marked in his former work. As 
Virginius, the avenger, the fierce breadth of passion, the 
boundless virility of the actor were put in splendid play. 
Over all was the guidance of an acutely keen intellect. 
Miss Alma Ivruger impersonated Virginia in a shy, girlish 
manner, brimful of youth, and not without a sweet charm 
in the face of rather an over-conscious presence. Icilius 
was a bit too musical to impress one with his sincerity; 
Mr. Lindsley's elocution is too saccharine to be manly, no 
matter how ardently he loves. William Harris, as Appius 
Claudius, and Harry Langdon, as Dentatus, were moder- 
ately good. 

* * * 

On Wednesday evening Mr. James gave Hamlet. It is 
with pardonable trepidation that one sits as au audi- 
tor to new lips in this most profound and complex char- 
acter in the English drama, and more particularly was it 
so when Mr. James' press Mercury bad announced the pre- 
sentation as one radical and startling — the happy ambigu- 
ity of which expression was not fully appreciated until tin' 
final curtain had precluded the possibility of any seriously 
disenchanting innovations. Mr. James' Hamlet is admir- 
able for its ingenuous perspicuity: a Hamlet intelligibly 
and methodically mad, not madly equivocal. After the 
ghost's visitation, from the first reply to Horatio's eager 
questioning, Mr. James clearly defines his Hamlet: the 
mistrustful glances at Marcellus that accompany the mean- 
ingless words are ostensibly the inspiration of his derange- 
ment. As a whole the Hamlet of Louis James is an earn- 
est, able performance. In the present dearth of geniuses 
it is from such talented and studious players as he that we 
must receive the immortal tragedies. In the fury of the 
last act, in the wild burst of grief at Ophelia's grave and 
in the closing of the second act, Mr. James gives us a liv- 
ing, breathing Hamlet, a Hamlet even reconciled with our 
fondest memories of the part. In the soliloquy and in the 
scene with the queen, that indefinable something, that 
magnetism, dominative genius, or whatever be it that 
compels a hearing from the very soul, is not to be found. 
It is beyond the limit of Mr. James' temperament. He 
does his best; and it is the best that we have seen since 
Edwin Booth. 

Miss Kruger's Ophelia was most prominent in the sup- 
port. Girlish and immature, vet a long remove from crude, 
Miss Kruger played her part with surprising nicety of 
perception. Mr. Lindsley's version of Laertes was in- 
tensely operatic. The remainder of the cast was satisfac- 
torily but uneventfully filled. 

* * * 

Marie Wainwright, an established star, an agreeable 
exponent of many standard and classic characters — in 
fact, a woman who has fed upon the best that the drama 
affords — presented at the Baldwin Theatre on Monday 
night, Th Daughters of Eve, a four-act society play by A. E. 
Lancaster and Julian Magnus. In spite of the presumable 
authenticity of its authorship, and the suggestion of merit 
that Miss Wainwright's adoption of the piece would signify, 
I am inclined to believe that The Daughters of Eve was 
snatched warm and bleeding from the columns of the 



Fireside Companion, and that the Lancaster-Magnus brand 
is but a touch of local color. (Mr. Magnus, if I correctly 
remember, once acted in a managcrical capacity for Miss 
Wainwright). Old students of the Fireside Companion — 
and they were many before Mr. Bok and his "Heart to 
Heart Talks to Young Men About Pajamas" swooped 
down on literary America — will perceive in Rhoda Dentry, 
the self-same young woman who, through scores of 
prurient intrigues and cases of bubbling wine, set their 
febrile pulses fluttering so intoxicatingly in the days gone 
bye. Rhoda was bad, always. Sometimes the man with 
the tall hat and the cigarette made her so by that vague 
process known as leading astray; at others she seemed, 
like Topsy, to have "justgrowed" that way. But she was 
a deuce of a girl at all events, redolent of sensuous per- 
fumes, always smartly gowned and bestockinged in the 
gauziest of silks. And she invariably fell heels-over-head 
in love with the hero — a love unreciprocated, and finally 
dispatched by prussic acid or entombed in a nunnery. 

Our Rhoda of the present week is no innovation. She 
meets Robert Hawthorne, the hero, at a ball in the upper 
tenderloin, whither he has been wafted by a most weird 
and uncanny jag, and, after her escort has felled Robert 
by a well-delivered and resounding right-hander, she has 
him carried to her apartments where she nurses him back 
into condition, aud then, that she may longer retain the 
man she loves, chloroforms him — a form of oblivion that 
makes Robert the envy of the audience. Rhoda has a twin 
sister, Grace by name — a good, beautiful, sad-eyed girl, 
and the beloved of Robert. She quarrels with Robert, and 
sends him out again into the wild, sinful world he had for- 
sworn for her sake. The final scene is Rhoda's apart- 
ments. Robert has, in a measure, recovered from the 
knock-out, the jag, and the chloroform. Rhoda is stricken 
with a violent change of heart; she implores forgiveness 
for the wrong she has done Robert and her sister, and 
takes her broken heart and her battered reputation off to 
the convent, which, fortunately coincident with her resolu- 
tion, is withiu a stone's throw of her rooms. Just in time 
her exit, for ere another minute the good sister Grace 
enters and takes her wandering boy back to her heart. 
The calcium gleams; the stained glass windows of the con- 
vent are luminous in the background. The organ throbs 
faintly in the distance the pa;on of a saved soul, and the 
curtain descends on two fond hearts united. Shades of 
Laura Jean Libbey, it is harrowing! 

The Daughters of Eve is another sociological study induced 
by long confinement in fourth-rate boarding houses. The 
serious lines are a blend of verbosity and paresis, the 
comedy would wring a heart of marble. "He's a good 
policeman — always on the beat,'' followed up by a stage-full 
of delirious laughter. That is a gem specimen of the wit 
that sparkles in the ball-room scene. The one glowing 
spot in the entire play is the slogging feat in this same 
act — but what a pity its possibilities are limited to two 
characters. 

Miss Wainwright plays Grace and Rhoda, and, despite 
the girls being twins and counterparts of one another, 
contrives to give a definite identity to each role. Her 
essay in a modern society drama is unfortunate only in the 
choice of the play. Nathaniel Hartwig burlesques the 
drunken business, and maims several opportunities by 
over-posing and over-acting. His mental anguish takes 
the most grotesque methods of physical demonstration. 
Barton Hill makes the most of a dignified and ungrateful 
part. If the authors intended Mrs. Dobbs to be a howling 
idiot and a towzled frump, and they evidently did, Miss 
Russell's version is quite successful. 



Society drama at the Baldwin, tragedy at the California, 
comedy, variety, and music at the other houses, it was 
timely for the Frawley Company to open their season at 
the Columbia with a strong, sensational play. The Lost 
Paradise combines sensationalism with brains in such a 
dexterous way as to make a drama that will appeal to the 
thoughtful theatre-goer as well as to the masses. It 
handles the labor question in a forcible and inoffensive 
manner, and, like The Ensign, displays the ability of the 
Frawley players for melodramatic, as well as comedy 
work. Mr. Frawley's tour has done him a world of good, 
if one may judge from the life and action he put into the 



January II, 1896. 



SAN FRANCIS AS LETTER 



younjf suporintondont Harlyn Arbuckle, always ;i 
taking. r<- itrong character of Andrew 

KnOwltOD, the ownrr of the iron works. Ralph StaodUh 
was the conve: ain in the hands of V. 

Hoore, and Bob Appleton was made delightfully jovial by 
Gcort- Jennie Kennark. returned to llu- 

••v fold, played Margaret, toe mill owner's daughter, 
with taste and feeling Mi>~ Archer and Miss Bates gel 
uside their Mmi: ' r the once, aim ell and 

Cinder;., girls from the works. Miss Archer's Nell, pale, 
pitiable, and feeble, was excellent); sustained; Cinders was 
a revelation in modern toughness. In fact, Phosa McAl- 
lister, Hope Rnss, H D. Blakemore, Charles Kino, and all 
the 11: ihis popular organisation were there, eon- 

er in their work, and seemingly glad to be 
in their home theatre again. 

» » » 

,1/v Ptrctout Baby, at the Alcazar, proves to be a refresh- 
ingly brisk piece of French comedy, worked into clever 
English lines, and well produced by Mr. Grover'.- company. 
Leonard Grover. Jr.. plays the boy who. up to his twenty- 
first year, has been chained to hismommer's apron string. 
These slender chains give way at last, and the youngster 
well makes up for the time lost. Young Grover infuses 
great mirth and deviltry into the lad, and makes of him an 
excellent comedy character, vivacious and gingery, and 
productive of no end of amusement for the audience. The 
company gives its accustomed strong support. 

* * * 

A vigorous old piece of melo-drama is The Fugitive, and a 
splendid presentation has it enjoyed this week at the 
Grand. Like hundreds of other pieces of the same char- 
acter, its theme is rewarded virtue and punished crime, 
and Mr. Morosco's actors, with their wonted skill in this 
line of work, have brought out all the fire and excitement 
that are in the play. jsext week Sedly Brown's comedy- 
drama, A Lour/ Lane, will be produced with the entire 
strength of the company. 

* * * 

At the Baldwin, Monday night, Marie Wainwright will 
begin her final week with Sheridan Knowles' famous old 
comedy, The Love Chase. Her impersonation of Constance 
in this piece was received with much favor in New York. 
The Love Chase holds the boards until Friday night, when 
Camille will be presented and repeated at the Saturday 
matinee. Tom Taylor's comedy, An Unequal Mateh will be 
given on Saturday and Sunday nights. 

* * * 

Next week the Prawley Company will present at the 
Columbia their great success of last season, The Senator. 
Mr. Arbuckle's Senator Rivers, Mr. Frawley's Lieutenant 
Schuyler, Mr. Blakemore's Ling Cling, and Miss Bates' 
Mrs. Hillary are too famous here to need more than an 
announcement of their repetition. 

* # # 

Louis James' second and last week at the California will 
see that favorite actor in four different characters. Mon- 
day and Thursday, Percy Sage's dramatization of Scott's 
Marmion; Tuesday, Othello; Wednesday and Sunday, Mac- 
beth; Friday and Saturday matinee, Romeo and Juliet, and 

Saturday night, Samlet. 

* * * 

It is not generally known that Mr. Adolph Bauer, the 
musical director of the Tivoli, is a very talented pianist. 
Mr. Bauer was for four years solo pianist with Wilnelmj, 
Sarsarte, and Camillo Urso. He will give two Chopin re- 
citals on Sundays, January 19th and 26th, at the St. 

Nicholas Hotel. 

* * * 

A host of new attractions, besides several of the old 
favorites, have been on the Orpheum's bill for this week. 
Miss Huth's negro dialect songs have caught the town. 
She is one of the cleverest women that have ever appeared 
at the Orpheum — and that is saying a great deal. 

* * * 

Ixion continues to crowd the Tivoli seven nights a week. 
The new edition introduces many clever songs, dances, and 
other specialties, and bids fair to keep the holiday attrac- 
tion going for several weeks to come. 



Columbia Theatre- 



«ti<! M 
' mlny. Jaouarv Iftth. 

• lliAWI.I.I OOMPAN . 

THE SENATOR. 

The pWfl 

v&J Win- ..ml po llltcal lit.- Id 

tOK'rttl It I \. IT tin) maiftlllHUMil 

■Luxury -.'Uli: TUB BN3IQN 



Baldwin Theatre 

Oomni'-m-im' Monday. Jon 181b 



Al. JlAYM.W 



(Inoorpo 
Proprli 






MARIE WAINWRIGHT, 

fend her own company. Mnnduy. Tuesday, Wednesday, and 

Thursday nights. TdE LOVE OB ASK, IV, 

Saturday matinee, CAMILLE Saturday and Bundaj niuhta, 

AN UNEQUAL MATCH 

Next Htiractiou: The only grand opera tblsseason THE tav- 

akv OPERA CO 



G-» I !-F^-~ !-. TU rt ^4-~« AL - hayman & 00 , C Incorporated) 
aliTornia i neatre. proprietors 



Next week. Monday, January 13th. 
America's representative tragedian, 



Propr! 

Second and last we. k i.r 



MR. LOUIS clAMES, 

Monday and Thursday, tlrst lime here "Marmion;" Tuesday, 
by request, •-Othello;'* Wednesday, "Macbeth:" Friday even- 
ing and Saturday matinee. " Romi-o and Juliet," Mr, James us 
Morcutlo; Samrday nlghr, " Hamlet; 1 ' Sunday (last perfor- 
mancc) "Macheih." Monday, Jan 20th, "In Old Kentucky " 

Morosco's Grand Opera Mouse. 

Walter Morosco, Sole Lessee and Proprietor. 
Last performances of '■ The Fugitive " 

MONDAY EVENING, Janua-y i"3th— Sedley Brown's great com- 
edy drama, 

A LONG LANE. 

Matinees Saturdays and Sundays 

Mrs Ernestine Kkeling. 

Proprietor and Manager 

Every evening. The gorgeous mythological spectacle. The 
second edition of 

IXION; or THE MAN OF THE WHEEL 

Grand i-allet; great east; superb costumes ; beautiiul scenery ; 
clever specialties; artistic marches The wondrous transfor- 
mation, -'Sea Shells." Tuesday evening, Jan. 14th, Souvenir 
Night. 25ih penormance of "Ixion." 
In preparation: " The Gentle Savage." 
Popular Prices 25c and 50c 

GrO\/er's f\ lea ZBr The palais R °y al of America. 

Every evening, until further notice, 

MY PRECIOUS BABY. 



Tivoli Opera House, 



Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Night Prices— 10c, 15c, 25c, 35c. 50c. 
Matinee Prices— 10c, 15c. and a5c. 



Oi San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

rpneU m . street, between Stockton and Powell streets- 
Tremendous success of our new people. Another great bill. 

6 NEW PEOPLE. 

Mason & Healy, Deltorelli Brothers. Ducro & Bush, Caron & 
Herbert, Manhattan Comedy Pour, and a magnincent company. 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony, 10c; Opera chairs and bos 
seats. 50c 



PODESTfl & BfUDOGGHI, 



FLORISTS and DECORATORS. 



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Between Kearny and Grant Avenue, San Francisco. Cal. 

Telephone Main 760. 



Dave Samson, 

PROGRESS 
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Imported Pilsener, Franciscaner, 
and Extra Pale Lager on draught. 

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I II t 1AM RCnnABn Tne En g lisn actress, coaches ladies and gentle 
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EAN ACADEMY, 913 Hyde street. San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January n, 1896. 




THANK heaven, the City Hall is going to be finished, 
not just yet, but some time later. Just now it is the 
dome that wants a few more nails, and the contractors 
have turned expanders, and have asked to have their con- 
tract expanded. So, two to one of the City Hall Com- 
mission, ninety days have been added on account of hard 
times. Let us be patient. Broderick, the Auditor, heard 
the cry of the distressed babel builders, and approved. 
The Mayor played the part of a Christian for the nonce, 
and said: Amen, so be it. Creswell insisted upon the 
pound of flesh, but was outvoted. So the City Hall is 
doomed to be domed some day. 

When the dome on the City Hall is finished there is to 
be placed upon its apex a statue of Liberty. There 
is some doubt as to who will lift it to its place, the con- 
tractors who haven't finished the dome declaring that they 
draw a line at putting it up, it not being a part of the 
dome, and the statue builder declaring his work done when 
the statue is finished and laid within reach of the derrick. 
Representing Liberty herself, the City Government itself, 
or anybody who really loves Liberty and his native land 
will be at liberty to finish the job. 

As a statue of Liberty on the City Hall, when it shall 
get there, that new statue will mean more liberty than 
any other statue of the kind in the world. It will be sym- 
bolic of the free and easy way in which we do things here 
and hereabouts. It will suggest hot only liberty, but it 
will hint of the liberties we take with the very spirit of 
Liberty. It will tell not only of political freedom, but also 
of all the kinds of freedom there are in the matter-of-fact 
world, and also in the world of the imagination. It will 
lift its hand over the municipal government, and suggest 
the liberties its officers take with the municipal treasury. 
It will seem to preside over the courts of law, where the 
estates of the dead are distributed with a liberty unsus- 
pected by the late lamented, and where matrimonial cages 
are opened to let loose the birds who find that liberty 
the sweetest which is earliest bought. It will seem to 
utter benedictions on the churches of the land, in which 
the people are free to worship God, and the ministers are 
free to worship the devil. But this is a rather unhappy 
theme, as the prospect opens, and so we shall take the 
libert3 r to forbear writing farther of the thing which 
everybody knows is the dearest thing on earth, but is 
every where treated as the cheapest, and is so shamefully 
abused that the very spirit of Liberty seems like a very 
devil, and makes most decent people wish in their hearts 
that Liberty herself were dead, and past resurrection. 

* * * 

The " tall man " and the " short man " into the farm took 
One day, as a co-partner, the glib-tongued " Eastern crook," 
And since that hour, when citizens are stopped upon the road, 
The " tall man " and the " short man" are said to be abroad; 
And when a bank cashier is robbed the robber wore the look 
The victimized at once declared of that bad " Eastern crook," 
But odd, it seems, in all the course of crimes, unvaried round 
The " short man," nor the " tall man," nor " Eastern crook," are 
found. 

So then, perforce, we must assume those merry knaves can grow 
From tall to short, from crooked to straight, and the detectives throw 
Oft all pursuit, yet 'tis but fair to give the rogues their due, 
Although they ever dodge arrest, they always " leave a clue." 

* * * 

Douglas Tilden, the sculptor, who so unfortunately 
is deaf and dumb, is at the same time serenely happy 
His appreciation of his own success and plastic genius are 
exalted by his expected nuptials in Oakland. But the 
other night he dined with Willis Polk and John Stanton in 
the California Hotel. Stanton told a lot of funny stories 
and amused the waiters vastly. They — to the number of 
three — (for it was late)— congregated about the table to 
hear the " Cuff rioir fairy-tales.'' 

Of course Douglas Tilden could neither speak nor hear. 
But all the same he smiled and beamed and basked, in the 



presence of so much attention. At last he wrote on a 
card to Stanton: 

" How in the world, did these men find out who I am!" 

All of which reminds one of dear old Oliver Goldsmith at 
Sir Joshua Reynolds' dinner, when Garrick turned to him 
and said severely: 

" Dr. Goldsmith, I saw you at the docks to-day, witness- 
ing the arrival of a lot of painted ladies from inlanders; 
and, sir, I was astonished to hear you murmur to yourself: 
' Why does all this crowd gape at these gaudy 
Jezabels, when the author of the 'Vicar of Wakefield' 'is 
among them! ' " 

Goldsmith blushed till his cheeks were scarlet, and 
answered: "Why Garrick, I know I was thinking that 
all the time; but I wasn't aware that I said it aloud! " 

However, Tilden can be frequently amusing, uncon- 
sciously as ever of course. The world at large is well 
aware that a bas-reliel, or a basso-relievo or whatever 
they call it in art, is a sculpture which stands slightly 
forth from the plane on which it is formed. 

When Mr. Tilden recently made his celebrated kick 
about the quarters assigned to the Bas-Relief students in 
the Hopkins' Institute he observed that " the worst of it 
is, the men have not room to move about. They are ex- 
pected to do bas-reliefs without moving around, which 
every modeler knows is impossible." 

Pray does Mr. Tilden make his own bas-reliefs round or 
square, that he has no room to circumvent them! or does 
he call his statues bas-reliefs ? 

* * * 

[After a little while, during which he (Dr. Brown) expressed him- 
self in a very emphatic way, he said: "This evening I shall lecture, 
and trust you will appear at the meeting." The subject was "A 
Pale Horse."— Extract from Mrs. Davidson's testimony.] 
The things which happened yesterday, 

Oft come to pass again, 
The rain succeeds the sunshine, 

And the sunshine follows rain : 
And so 'tis not surprising 

But just the same old course, 
Doc Brown left Mattie. ruby haired, 
To preach on the "White Horse." 

* * * 

George T. Knox, the notary, whose ability as a racon- 
teur is no less admirable than his wisdom as a notary, was 
busily engaged after New Year's Day taking "swear off" 
affidavits. Among those who forswore allegiance to the 
inspiriting cup was the "short-bit capitalist," a prominent 
citizen who has earned this sobriquet from his custom of 
always paying, in a Montgomery street saloon, for his soli- 
tary drink with a short bit. He took the usual oath, and 
when the document was handed to him for examina- 
tion, said: 

"But, Colonel Knox, you have omitted an important 
clause." 

"What is that?" inquired the notary, slightly nettled at 
this imputation on his accuracy. 

"On my own account, sir," rejoined the wealthy bibulant, 
"I swear off on my own account. But I have said nothing 
about drinking on the account of others." 

The all-important addition was made, and the capitalist 
departed with his "swear off," to look for a victim. 



That wild snorter of the Alameda prairies, Dr. Bovard, 
is again blowing through his fiery nostrils wrathful gusts 
at all clubs, as being conducive to knocking the pins from 
under Christianity. 

Bovine Bovard's loud bellowings would fill a rotten tub, 
The club to suit this orator should be a loaded club, 
A club well charged with common sense on his gray matter failing, 
The wholesome lesson might impart to cease his silly bawling. 
* # # 

The constitution of our mental and moral being is such 
that in order to preserve a vital equipoise we have to 
cherish in our community not only eloquent and somewhat 
moral ministers, but also statesmen whose record can be 
read by any one with half an eye, with that kind of pride 
that satisfies one's whole moral appetite. Now, there's 
that great and good man, late the Congressman from the 
Stockton district to the Congress of the United States, 
more recently Governor of the State. He has always been 



January 1 1, 189''. 



FRANCISCO M \\ - LETTER 



pound.*, of which about sevi-n |>»und.-> were chock, ;u»] the 

PC spoota 

When tin- Kxumincr ».i~ co ccting 

irnla on tin 1 -ul> 

Funding Hill, the Governor, with his Angers in 

■ill half of Iris eye Ixmii upon the 

is, read aloud to the enquirer 

-jiifiit words in which, when he was a mere babe 

in the science of statesmanship, he pioneered tin- way to 

•vornini'nt ownership of the trunk lino between here 

and yonder. If the Governor badn'l been b great man 

from the start, lie would have been obliged to formulate an 
r to the inquiry instanter, As it was, ipn dixit — 

i sai.l it. He was then a statesman in the Hud. He 

v a Hudd in statesmanship — the Gubernatorial 

chair — and loves to read aloud the record of his precocity. 

Later will he not he a Huddd in the Senate: then, maybe, 
swell into a Hudddd in the Presidential chair? We imag- 
ine that will be considerably later. Such examples of early 
greatness are rare, but California runs to large develop- 
ments, and we have to have them. 

* * * 

Tbe lion may a twist endure of his prehensile tail, 

May growl at Venezuela, and scout the Clan-na-Gael, 

To Russia smiling say, " Dear Bear, old Turkey is no loss for us, 

" Be good, we'll give you elbow room, perhaps, upon the Bosphorus;" 

But when young (iertuan Billy cries, '■ come here and see the fly on 

" The tawny and much battered hide of this voracious lion," 

The beast doth howl, the war foam flies from out his clashing jaws, 

He bellows " Billy, take it back or else you'll feel my claws." 

* * * 

Jeremiah Lynch told a funny tale at the Bohemian Club 
the other night about a friend of his who is a prominent 
street contractor. This individual, it seems, was holding 
forth at great length on the problem of Great Britain's 
woes. 

"The Napolyon ar' Yurrup is, Queen Victoria! " said 
the Contractor to his admiring friends; " She's filled full 
av' liquor and ambition. It ain't the English what wants 
to war, they all av' thim know they're scared. But 
Queen Victoria she wants to be ould Queen Elizabeth all 
over agin. She's deep — that ould woman ! — and she want's 
to be queen av' all creation! " 

Poor, tired old Queen Victoria! — Ambitious at her age! 
— That's all one may say. 

* * * 

Capid and Hymen for some weeks have scowled at one another, 
Tbe men of law who tie the knot had caused them so much bother; 
Groezinger collared all tbe fees for splicing happy couples, 
And squeezed tbem till the eagle screamed between his brawny 

knuckles; 
Now Kerrigan is at the bat, and at cut rates will tie men 
To those they love, so Cupid drinks again with merry Hymen. 

ANEW shoe is a problem. Most people dread the ordeal 
of "breaking tbem in." But when one can go to P. 
P. McNulty's, 139 Post street, and secure shoes that one 
may wear with perfect ease and entire comfort from the 
first moment they are placed on the feet it is serene en- 
joyment. In fact, corns are unknown to them. But at the 
same time the}' are thoroughly fashionable. The most 
"swagger" set in town goes to no one else except McNulty, 
and the fashionable clubmen are universally his patrons. 

THE Regeneration of Remorse. — Every time a man be- 
thinks himself that he is not walking in the light, that 
he has been forgetting himself and must repent, that he 
has been asleep and must awake, that he has been letting 
his garments trail and must gird up the loins of his mind 
— every time this takes place there is a resurrection in 
the world. — George MacDonald. 

The remainder of the entire stock and beautiful fixtures of Colonel 
A. Andrews' Splendid Diamond Palace is now up for a final auction 
sale. There have been some magnificent bargains realized there this 
week during the sales — which by tbe way, continue from half-past 
ten in the morning till late in ibe afternoon. Colonel Andrews has 
been noted for years as the best judge of precious stones on this 
continent, and some of tbe finest gems in bis collection are still to be 
bad. 




CLEARANCE SALE of 



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Head Golds, 



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FIRE 
HOSE. 



JXTJNGUIS11KH. 

Chemical Fire Engines. 

Water Towers, Hook and Ladder 
Trucks, Eclipse Lanterns, Hose Reels, 
Rubber Goods of every Description. 

GOODYEflR RUBBER 60., 

R. H, PEASE, Vice-President and Manager. 
577 and 579 Market St., San Fraacisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January II, 1896. 




SMONG the many reso- 
lutions sure to be made 
in the opening of the New Year, it is said, the following 
old sayings will fit admirably several of our society beaux. 
One gallant soldier is quoted as advising a certain pretty 
bud not to be so fickle and uncertain, reminding her that 
"a rolling stone will never gather Moss." Another, a 
young man of millions, is pondering over the axiom, "it is 
well to be off with the old love before one is on with the 
new." Another is: they say, considering the idea of hav- 
ing an ode written to the old missionary hymn tune to be 
sung by the guests at his next supper: "To Greenway's 
ice-ci-eam function we've come a happy band." Yet an- 
other is said to be determined on making his best girl 
Winn, mothers-in-law to the contrary notwithstanding. 
An old soldier is credited with saying it is considered fine 
to be an old man's Darling, but it isn't in it with being an 
old woman's. 

* * * 

It is funny to listen to a bevy of girls commenting upon 
the different steps and styles of dancing of the men who 
are their partners at cotillions. This is about what they 
say: Wilcox has a loose sort of roll; Maus glides beauti- 
fully; Davis is sentimental in his way of holding his part- 
ner: Southard Hoffman prances; Addy Mizner is jerky; 
Summerall is too lovely for anything; Morton Gibbons keeps 
perfect time; Ed. Greenway is so fat he has to hold your 
waist at arm's length; Al. Bowie's step is slow and grace- 
ful; Tom Van Ness has a hop, skip and jump style; Willis 
Polk is slouchy; Winston holds a girl splendidly, he's so 
tall; Joy es, on the contrary, is sort of afraid to "brace 
up" his right arm to a stiff tension; Tara McGrew dances 
all over his partner's toes. 

* * * 

A rumor is afloat in the swagger exclusive B'linsrham 
set that it is meditated by the powers that be in that fa- 
vored spot to have a society circus. Now, what special 
form this species of amusement is going to be is what is 
provoking curiosity in the swim. Society is known to in- 
dulge in many a pastime which can appropriately be called 
a "circus," yet no ring nor clown is appended. Again, a 
ring and clown in society often produce a decided circus 
in themselves. The gossip of the hour is that a bona fide 
old time circus is what is meant in this case, however; and 
Hobart, Baldwin, Clifton, Tobin, in fact, all the sports of 
that select settlement are to take part. On dit, Jack 
Casserley will do an act on stilts, and Carey Friedlander a 
feat never yet equaled. 

* * * 

The result of such esclandres as the Brown-Davidson 
affair is nowhere more apparent than in the attitude ob- 
served by our men — particularly the old ones — toward the 
naughty fair sex. No more doth the fascinating type- 
writer cast her wiles with success. A cold wave now 
takes the place of the affectionate, fatherly interest of 
yore of her employer, and the confidential stenographer is 
now relegated to an outer office. It is amusing to note the 
difference of the late afternoon car passengers. The men 
are all busy with their papers now, and do not cast even 
a glance in the direction of the ogling feminine who sits 
near, 

* * * 

There is some talk of an army and navy ball to be given 
before Lent. The army does more than its share of enter- 
taining, and the women should show their appreciation of 
it by taking a little extra trouble in going out to the Pre- 
sidio hops, even though the night be dark and chilly. " A 
big ball in which the navy unites is sure to draw a large 
crowd, and already the buds are planning fresh gowns for 
the occasion. 

* * * 

If Dame Rumor speaks by the card, one of the sweetest 
as well as fairest belles has been captured by a young 
society beau. At any rate the probabilities are so dis- 
cussed, and it has made a Breeze in society's drawing- 
rooms, of late. 



Talbot Clifton is said to be in a state of huge disgust 
over the report that a charming bud of the season has got 
" the whip hand" of the leader in horsey doings at B'ling- 
ham. The Britisher is reported as bewailing the fact be- 
cause he fears the check-rein may become a feature of the 

harness in future. 

* * # 

A pretty girl who lives iu a quaint corner house, is said 
to be likely to share the Joyes of an army life in the near 
future. 

GREETING. 

To all my friends and acquaintances New Year's greet- 
ing. 

At the same time I take this opportunity to extend to 
the music loving public as well as to the representative 
press of San Francisco, my sincerest thanks for all the 
many marks of appreciation and encouragement shown 
me during my recent stay in their midst. 

Fritz Scheel, 

New York, Dec. 27, 1895. Kapellmeister. 

THE death of Robert George, of Sausalito, will be 
greatly deplored in Marin County. His prominent 
business and social position and the invaluable services 
which he performed in behalf of the beautiful little town in 
which he resided render his loss a public calamity there. 
For fifteen years he had been the secretary of the Sausa- 
lito Land and Ferry Company, and, in that capacity, he 
was largely instrumental in the splendid improvements 
which have marked its rapid progress. Mr. George was 
born in Baltimore seventy years ago, and leaves a wife 
and five children. 



During the recent war-talk in London, it seeras that the Music 
Halls have revived the famous old "ChampagneCbarley" song, with 
its patriotic touch and its celebrated Moet & Chandon refrain. 

After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. You 
will find it admirable. 

The New Creamerie. 

Young & Weiseman's Popular Establishment Still Gaining a De- 
served Reputation. 

The New Creamerie, at 725 Market street, has since its founding 
been a place of resort for the most particular of San Francisco's epi- 
cures. A first-class service, aided by an extremely low scale ot 
prices, has been influential in establishing the reputation of this famous 
house, but these have been well backed up by the many original ideas ad- 
vanced and by the high quality of the food furnished, and, in spite of its 
competitors' jealousy, the Creamerie continues to hold a foremost place 
among San Francisco's restaurants. All the butter, eggs, milk, cream, 
and vegetables used on its tables are all produced at the ranch of the pro- 
prietors, which guarantees their purity and freshness. Special attention 
is given to the bread and pastry used, everything in this line being baked 
on the premises and under the eye of the proprietors, while the entree is a 
special feature which alone would serve to make the place popular De 
lightful string music is one of the features 

A Sunday "Table d'Hote " dinner, the price of which is only SO cents 
and which will outclass any dinner served in the city, is a new addition to 
the attractions of the New Creamerie. 



' TRADEMARK 



A IK II A I N IAIN 



%™<y 



^-.: 



ROYAL BOVlfi GIN, 

In Large Square 
White Bottles. 

Beware of refilled bottles. 

Without Exception the Finest Gin 

Imported, and Especially Adapted for 

family use and Medicinal Purposes. 

For Sale by the Leading Grocers and Wine Merchants. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Sole Agents for Pacific Coast. 314 Sacramento St., S. F. 



January it, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO Nl US LETTER 



'.1 



T 



HENRY I. DODGE. 
<■ 

for tin- ml- 
Henrv I. Dodjje, in n 

which 
this branch of our 
municipal govern- 
ment have in his in- 

^t • Mr. Scott S nom- 

**. mating speech ex- 

pressed the situ- 
^L^- at inn when he said: 

m-^i "I think that, with- 

out regard to pol- 
itics, under the 
present govern- 
ment, the members 
of this Board have 
been treated very 
fairly. The rulings 
have always been 
just, and, remem- 
bering the old adage 
//• nry L. Dodgt . that it is poor policy 

to swap horses in the middle of the stream, I therefore 
nominate Mr. Dodge for this Board for another year." 

The result was entirely favorable to Mr. Dodge, of 
course, although he was himself a warm adherent for the 
election of Mr. C. A. Murdoch. Mr. Dodge has held dis- 
tinguished official positions during his long career on the 
Pacific Coast, but he is doing magnificent service nowa- 
days. 

AN ILL WIND. 



CUESE' the luck!" 
The milkman gave a vicious tug at the pump handle 
and jumped into his wagon. Giving vent to his spite by 
whipping his horse unmercifully, he sped down the road, 
leaving the air blue behind him. 

For years he had left home every morning before day- 
break with his cans half filled with milk. These he 
stocked up with water from the old pump and then pro- 
ceeded to serve his customers. For the first time in his 
career as a purveyor of pure milk from his own dairy, the 
pump had failed him. Somebody had broken the handle. 

It was too late to return home, and he hadn't the nerve 
to borrow any water from his neighbors, hardened though 
he was. 

In the midst of his reflections, he was accosted by a 
stranger, who ordered him to stop, at the same time dis- 
playing a State Dairy Inspector's badge. With a much 
better grace than the official had expected, the milkman 
pulled up his horse and uncovered the cans for inspection. 
The result was a complete surprise to the man with the 
badge. He was utterly dumbfounded. For the first time 
in his life all the milk he tested was absolutely pure. 

The news spread far and wide. Soon the milkman had 
not a single rival left in the place. The monopoly made 
him rich, and everywhere he went he was proudly pointed 
out as the one honest milkman. 

— James J. O'Connell, in Truth. 



The Pommery Sec Stakes. 

In the race last Saturday at the Bay District track, for. the Pom- 
mery Sec stakes, the time was 1:39%, beating the former Coast re- 
cord, which was 1:40. This remarkable time suggests a parallel. The 
noble horse which sped over the track, and won honor, knew not 
that the prize raced for bore a name which is held in high honor by 
all the aristocratic epicures in the Old World and this. The man 
who drinks Pommery wins sound health, a clear mind , a wholesome 
and even temper, and a broad and sunny view of humanity. If he is 
going the pace, Pommery Sec restores his health, invigorates his 
palate, and comes to him an angel of recuperation, enveloped in a 
garment of sparkling wine. The course of life, like the course the 
horse speeds over, gains additional value when the stakes are of such 
wide import. 

No visitor ever fails to visit the wonderful Japanese goods and 
cloisonne ware at Geo. T. Marsh & Co.'s, under the Palace Hotel. 



SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 



UNION TRUST COMPANY 



Of San Francisco, 



January 2. 1896. 



ASSETS. 



Hank Premises 

United Statet and other Bonda 

Loans on Real Estate 
Loans on Murk- ami Bonds 
Money on Hand 
Dae from Hanks and Hankers 
Furniture and Fixtures 
other Assets 



074 "'1 

m 90 

862,228 7:s 
940.600 'hi 

'.11 128 6! 

80 1,478 mi 

9.508 17 

50,080 77 



12.675,190 49 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Paid in Coin "50,000 00 

Reserve Fund 10,000 00 

Profit and Loss and Contingent Fund 51,484 91 

Due Depositors 1,802,013 47 

Other Liabilities 1 082 11 



$2,075,190 49 



• • ■ ;o:kx3q?xxxxx.x>sxxx 

• Why 
I Evans' ? 

£? Reasons : 
Gj Best Malt and Hops . 

M Mountain Spring Water. 

jxj Years in the Wood. 

> Improved bottling. 

■ Result : 

Finest Ale Brewed. 

No Harmful Acidity. 
|£ No False Ferments. 

No Cloud of Sediment. 

EVANS' 
India Pale Ale 

11 SjIJ by lead ng Ho'els. C ubs & Cafes 
C. H. EVANS & SONS, 
Hudsoo, New York. 
G SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

C^i S. P., Portland, Los ADgeles. 

'ir..i".:-:. mm .%:.<:• '.< 




ERNST H. 



LUDWIG & CO.. 

The Model 

American 

Caterers. 



1206 Sutter St., S. F. 



Telephone 2388 



Joseph Glllott's Steel Pens. 



Gold Medals, Paris 1878-1889. These pens are " the best 
in the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
MR. HENRY HOE. 91 John Street, New York. 



Sold by all stationers. 



Gray Bros. 



316 Montgomery Street. S F. 

No. 205 New High St.. Los Angeles. 



Concrete Artificial 
Stone Work. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 1 1, 1896. 




Major McLaughlin's 

Recent 

Retirement. 



The scurvy treatment Major Frank 
McLaughlin received from a por- 
tion of the press of this city on 
the eve of his retirement from 
the active management of the miues on the Feather river, 
near Oroville, was just about what might be expected in a 
quarter where the worst construction is put on every- 
thing, no matter whether it be right or wrong. In the 
desire to say a few little mean and nasty things, the fact 
was overlooked entirely that McLaughlin has been the 
means of bringing some millions of money into the State. 
A very large proportion of this money was paid out for 
labor, putting bread into the mouths of families which 
would otherwise have experienced the pangs of poverty 
during the hard times which have borne so heavily on the 
working classes for some years past. No mention was of 
course made of this or many other benefits which the 
State has derived one way and another from the inaugur- 
ation of an enterprise which has no equal in modern times 
from an engineering standpoint. It is this same mean and 
carping disposition which has done so much to hurt the 
State abroad. No matter how promising an enterprise 
may be, nor how faithfully it is conducted, the small-souled 
individual who is always with us, is sure to find some basis 
for an underhand attack. This reputation has hurt Cali- 
fornia abroad more than might be believed, especially in 
cases where men less favorably situated than Major 
McLaughlin are unable to defend themselves. The English 
investors in the Feather River mines have nothing but the 
kindliest feelings toward the man who, over watchful of 
their interests, has devoted years of his life to the work 
on their property. During the entire seven years which 
Major McLaughlin has devoted to the management of this 
stupendous enterprise not a dollar has been paid to him as 
salary. He simply stood on a level with other share- 
holder's in the division of any profits which have accrued, 
but, in addition, gave up his time, and supplied the brains 
and energy to execute a work of such magnitude and char- 
acter. Without McLaughlin, the snow-fed torrents of the 
turbulent Feather would still be dashing in heavy volume 
over the massive bowlders which mark its course through 
mountain gorges, instead of flowing peacefully under con- 
trol as it does now; elevated many feet above its ancient 
bed, and, without a McLaughlin, the object of this her- 
culean task will never be attained. It is pleasant to be in 
a position to authoritatively assure the malignants, so 
grievously exercised over Major McLaughlin's relations 
with his recent associates in the Golden Gate and Golden 
Feather Companies, of London, that they continue as 
friendly as of old, mingled with a sincere regret that his 
decision is unalterable in regard to retirement from the 
position of general manager, in which, from first to last, 
he has earned the most flattering enconiums from share- 
holders both large and small. 



The San Francisco 
Stock Exchange. 



On Monday next the annual election 
of the San Francisco Stock Ex- 
change will take place, and in view 
of the important changes inaugurated, involving the listing 
of a new class of mines, it is one of the most important 
which has ever taken place. For the executive position 
of President Mr. Joseph Marks and Mr. Gurnett have 
been nominated. In Mr. Marks the nominating committee 
has made a most happy choice. He is in every respect a 
true representative of the typical broker, brainy and 
energetic, with a reputation which has never yet been 
questioned. He is just the man required now to put the 
Board where it belongs among the leading institutions of 
this city. Confining his business strictly to the commission 
branch, his sympathies would naturally be with the men on 
the floor, while experience has taught him the line of duty, 
but for the development of the business and the general 
prosperity of the Exchange. Active and popular with all 
who are brought in contact with him, he is in every sense 
a representative man, who will reflect credit upon the 
Board no matter in what position he may be placed. The 
members cannot too highly appreciate a man of his char- 



acter, and in honoring him they are honoring themselves. 
There is little doubt that Mr. Marks will be elected and 
his entry into office will signalize a new and brighter era 
for the Exchange, which iucludes many worthy and honor- 
able men among its membership. The San Francisco Stock 
Exchange is worthy of more recognition than it receives 
just now from the public of this city, but the election of 
such men as Marks, a man above suspicion, will go a great 
way in building up confidence among outside investors. 
While the companies, be they on the Comstock or off it, 
listed on the Board can expect fair play under the Marks 
regime, we will venture to say that they will be kept 
under better control and in a truer line of conduct than 
they ever have been when other men have been in power, 
whose only claim on the office was an untoward display of 
an inimical feeling to the so-called "insiders." The other 
offices will be filled by the present able and courteous in- 
cumbents, many of whom have done faithful yeoman's ser- 
vice in the Board. 

California Gold The citizen that is not interested in a 
Mines gold mine now is not in it, and the 

Are Booming, chances are that he will come a cropper 
later on in trying to head the procession 
of coming millionaires with a blind jump. The small people 
have now got hold of the line, and prospects are in demand. 
The big fish can have their going concerns for all the pub- 
lic cares at this end of the world. A story is now going 
the rounds of a young fellow working in a Market street 
pharmacy for a pittance, who got a relative to grub stake 
him on a prospecting tour. After hard work he managed 
to strike it up in Nevada County, and has now a little 
ledge opened up from which he is taking out $1500 a month. 
The shortage of water in the mountains is being felt in this 
city now, although, perhaps, it may not be yet perceptible 
to some people who have forgotten that there is such a 
thing as a mine in California. At least one and one-half 
millions of dollars in gold has been tied up in the moun- 
tains by the failure of the water supply, which would 
have, otherwise, come into town. A falling off of gold 
shipments to this extent must, necessarily, make itself 
felt in commercial circles. 

The Alaska In the Alaska mine the Grizzly tunnel has 
Mill been run in 165 feet, and good ore has been 

To Start Up. found for a considerable distance back from 
the face. Of the forty stamps already in 
place, twenty have been repaired and are ready to drop 
next week when milling will begin. The improvements 
which have been already made to this plant are of such a 
substantial nature that the mill is even better than it was 
when first erected. Mr. Randolph Payne arrived in town 
a few days ago, but will return to the property as soon as 
possible. We have nothing to say, but to reiterate that 
this mine, under proper management, will turn out to be 
one of the best purchases ever made by the English investor 
on this Coast. 

Comstock No new feature developed in the mining 
Mining market ou Pine street during the week. The 

Shares. news from the mines continues favorable, but 
the speculative voice is unresponsive. Possi- 
bly after the gold mines make their appearance in the 
Board there will be an incentive to get in and do some 
rustling. As it is, the public can hardly be blamed for not 
standing iu. There are no chances to make a turn at a 
profit worth taking a risk upon, and this is at the bottom 
of the dull times on the street. 

United States From figures received the director of the 
Gold Yield. mint estimates the total gold output of 
the United States at about $47,000,000. 
During the past year California produced $15,600,000 in 
gold and 154,700 ounces of silver. Nevada produced 
$1,700,000 in gold, and 022,000 ounces of silver. California's 
gold production is larger than that of any other State, 
Colorado coming next with $15,000,000 worth. 

Mining Schools. The proposition to devote twenty-five 
per cent, of all money paid to the 
United States by each of the States for mineral lands for 
the maintenance of schools of mines in each of said States, 
will be hailed with satisfaction by the mining community at 
large. The passage of the bill by Congress will be the 
death-knell of impostors now masquerading as mining ex- 
perts. 



January 1 1. 1896. 



SAN FRANC 



'3 




What tbedcrll art thou' 
bat will PUT Ihflderll, ulr. with ■. 



I I ride 

1 out tlir names of those 

ration, this 

W. H. V. '' vho ignorantly and unblushingly 

would bear the ■ 

. .ii employe of tin- State Government, it has 

■ revise t! bool Ixniks. lie has 

.ief duty to !*• the drawing of his monthly 

Instead of revising the old grammar, he 

• 1 his inability to understand what tin: 

'iH'un>. and a like inability to devise a 

grammar. He has. accordingly, employed a couple of 

fwho know more grammar in a minute than be 
new. to write a spiek and span now grammar at $150 per 
month each. He has explained to the Governor that he 
was. meanwhile, spending his time in the more arduous 
task of using his scissors and pasting scraps together for 
a new reader. We commend this highly honest educator 
to the attention of the people, that he may be taught a 
in each of those studies, grammar and reading. Let 
him '.earn the difference between the present and the past 
as expressed in the sentence:" Professor Raymond 
Hxu in the employ of the State, instead of is in that employ. 
That will teach him also how easy it is, by a new method, 
to read a knave out of office. As to "the girls, whose 
grammar is said to be such as will beget a mental chaos in 
the minds of all pupils, they may be well satisfied that they 
have easily accomplished the dread result that all the 
grammarians from away back have succeeded in doing. 

THE town of Truckee, which up to date has been more 
noted for its vigilance organization, known as "The 
101," than for efforts of an aesthetic nature, has this sea- 
son distinguished itself by the construction of a so-called 
"ice palace." The people of Truckee have at their com- 
mand all the frigidity required to make the enterprise a 
success, and by a free use of water and hose have con- 
trived to completely cover a circular wooden rink with a 
glittering coating of ice, outside and in. Then there is a 
toboggan slide, as an additional attraction, and all the 
residents of the sunny valleys and of the towns and cities 
by the sea have been invited to take a trip to the lumber 
town high up in the Sierra and experience a little of what 
is called "old-fashioned fun." Much of this hilarity is of the 
marrow-freezing and tooth-chattering order, but for those 
who enjoy a temperature of zero or thereabouts there is 
much in this festival at Truckee to repay a journey over 
the Summit in Midwinter. Before the close of the ice 
carnival, the historic "601" may find occasion for a mani- 
festation of its old-time skill with the tar bucket, and this 
consideration adds a "special inducement" to the 
"occasion." 

NOW since Ingersoll has withstood the concerted on- 
slaught of prayer, what do the pious conspirators in- 
fer '! That their appeal was too quietly made and, there- 
fore, was not heard, or that high Heaven was busy caring 
for the unambitious and the humble ? It strikes us, as 
would a sledge-hammer, that the Christian Endeavorers 
should not try heaven so much after the manner of the 
rain-makers, nor suppose that prayer is like a swarm of 
bees to be " settled " by the noise of a beaten tin pan. It 
is possible that Ingersoll is not as important in the eyes of 
God as he is in the gaze of Christians whose eyes are daz- 
zled by the false flash of his rhetoric. If orthodoxy be true, 
it may be that the Lord is willing to let Ingersoll go for 
the retributive benefit of the lost; or, being most merciful, 
He may let him go below to cheer the melancholy set. 

THAT the British lion has a tail is known to every 
American patriot, and on this side of the world it has 
come to be believed that the tail was made to be twisted. 
But it seems not. When other than a cousinly hand gave 
it a turn in Berlin last week, the show of teeth and the roar 
of the venerable beast astonished our jingoes. There is 
blood in the old lion, and fight, too, as Emperor William is 
evidently realizing. 



S v ■ the 

smothertngly dark frith 

the " ;. t.. tome deeds of such mon 

,t ire cannot bear the roar of other 
people for the very din we are making ourselves. We are 
.1 mighty had lot, and when the ministers put on 
■"i es] mctiraonious look and ask each other to join 

in prayer, they can't help laughing. It Is certain that if 
things go on much longer, «ve shall have to stop attending 
prayer meetings, and instead of putting our nickels Into 
the contribution box, shall have to divert them to the new 
slot machines, which will i>e mkhi made to toss out a card 

On which the name of the next long shot will be expr 

in ciphers known only by ourse 

SPEAKING of Dr. Brown, the spiritual adviser of the 
Reverend Sam Mayer's congregation, the Presby 
terian vicegerent of the Lord for the gathering in of souls 
into Christ's everlasting kingdom, it looks as though, in 
the repentant language of that great and good man. 
Henry Ward Beecher, in whose steps the Rev. Brown has 
plainly been trying to walk,— it looks as if he, the said 
Brown, had been, to his own soul's extreme delight, in- 
indulgiiig in the sugared, paroxysmal kiss, about five lingers 
deep. 

OP course we do not know the way in which the Rever- 
end Dr. Brown's mind and emotions operate, but if 
he isn't on what Brother Beecher described as the ragged 
edge of despair, we know little of the ragged edges of any- 
thing. But, if things keep going on as they have been, 
without any let-up in the evolution of religious nastiness, 
we shall have to join the other brethren in delivering the 
decree of the decent people, that Dr. Brown do now from 
his pulpit step down and out, and cease everlastingly 
henceforth calling other people sinners, or trying to coax 
them up to the stool of repentance. 

IP Dr. Brown has about his church, or his home, or he 
knows where there is any over-large sized stool of re- 
pentance of the true blue kind, he had better take a pre- 
emption on it, for he will need it to sit on, and stand on, 
and sleep on, to continually cry therefrom that his sin has 
found him out, that he is a mighty bad minister of the 
Lord, that there isn't blood enough in any Lamb to wash 
out his sins, and that it will require a whole fold of full 
grown sheep to do it well. 

IT surprises no one that the Spanish Government should 
exercise in Cuba a strict censorship over press dis- 
patches, but that a free government like that of England 
should do the same thing in South Africa has stunned the 
journalistic mind so completely that it has not the strength 
left wherewith to utter a complaint. It is only speechlessly 
astonished. The men who are attending to England's 
interests have plainly come to the conclusion, which has 
been reached by many others, that government by news- 
papers should not be absolute. It does very well in times 
of peace, but, when war threatens, and statesmen and 
soldiers retire the newspapers and take their place, men 
of sense approve. 

THE Rev. Dr. Cook of Boston has returned from abroad 
impaired in body. He was a much over-estimated 
man. Imprudent of speech, yet he was inclined to speak 
boldly on matters which would have engaged the sober 
thought of a philosopher. In his egotism he was typically 
American. In Seattle he referred in a public speech to 
loca. matters of a very delicate nature. In Hawaii he did 
likewise, and was asked by the United States Minister, 
who was present, to modify his remarks. The consequent 
humiliation doubtless preyed upon him mentally to his bod- 
ily hurt. 

THE tumult over the Venezuelan difficulty has done 
much to down the cant about " ties of blood " between 
this country and England; the "brotherhood " of the two 
great English-speaking nations, and other bosh of the 
same sort. So, it is to be hoped, the present local stir in 
church circles will go far to expose the hypocrisy of a 
large number of pious humbugs, male and female, who 
trade upon their professions of religion and their connec- 
tion with the churches. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Januaty n, i£ 




iS 



A Book "Marie Corelli " is fond of dealing with the 
of the supernatural in some of her stories. She has 
Week.* written some books in which the mystical largely 
prevail. Her characters are, as a rule, strong, 
clear, and well-drawn, and, among the most ardent of her 
admirers, she can claim Her Britannic Majesty. Her real 
name is Marian Mackay, and it may he truly said that she 
is one of the most popular English authors of the day. But 
by " popular " it must not be understood that we mean a 
discrimination of what is best, for the writings of " Marie 
Corelli" are, usually, too hectic for our tastes. Her char- 
acters may be well-drawn, but they are not real charac- 
ters. They are not the men and women one meets in 
every day life, simply because to draw such characters 
well requires genius, and that is something "Marie Corelli" 
does not possess. To our mind bet- writings are too stagey 
and her characters, no matter how well drawn, always 
remind us that they are aiming after effect. When we 
read her books we very often think that there is more 
sound than sense between their covers. They might have 
pleased us during our school days, but we have left those 
days behind us some decades. Now, in our mature life, we 
look on her writings as too ornate and unhealthy. We 
always look on her style as very like that of Ouida's. It is 
turgid and turbid, but it is not immoral. Although tainted 
with idiotic theosophical nonsense, yet, like Ouida in her 
best days, the writings of "Marie Corelli " are full of ex- 
uberant vocabulary and pyrotechnic imaginings. And, it 
appears to us that her last book, " The Sorrows of Satan," 
is very much in line with her previous books — good in its 
moral tone, bumptious in its dialogue; brilliant in some of 
its parts, but wanting in that touch of nature whichcauses 
our inner self to feel that the thing is not real, and that it 
is a mere chimera and a sham. True, in her present 
volume she is very severe upon the prurient literature of 
the day; she assails Mr. Swinburne, and does not spare 
the adjectives in her assaults; she attacks the shams which 
discredit what some people profess to be Christianity, and 
she does not avoid censuring the so-called moral loftiness 
of Her Majesty's Court. Although, like Ouida, her thirst 
for sensation is great, yet she is the opposite of Ouida in 
her moral perception, for "Marie Corelli " becomes exub- 
erant in the completeness with which she denounces vice, but, 
withal that, her book, " The Sorrows of Satan," is delight- 
fully diabolical in its sensationalism and in its startling situ- 
ations. It gives the reader one "thrill" to every few pages, 
and that ought to be enough for any ordinary sensation 
seeker. First of all, we have Satan, who goes to London dis- 
guised as a handsome, unknown, but very wealthy, prince, 
while he assumes the name of Lucio Ramanas. Of course he 
becomes popular, and society makes him one of its idols. 
Then a certain titled lady appears upon the scene, and she 
promptly falls in love with Satan. The morality of this 
lady is somewhat tainted. She has been reading Swin- 
burne's poems, and Lady Sibyl, for that is her name, has 
surrendered herself to Swinburne's teachings. She sees 
Satan, loves and is conquered, and in a fit of spasmodic 
passion she flings her arms around Lucio and tells of her 
love. This is a piece of stage play, a "thrill," a "burning 
incident" which gives the reader some idea of how "Marie 
Corelli" makes situations. But what must we think of 
Lucio, who, marvelous to say, pushes the fair Lady Sibyl 
from him, calling her hard names as he does so. This is 
another incident, another "thrill," for it apparently makes 
quite a good Satan out of Lucio. Who ever thought of 
making the devil a moralist before, except for a purpose? 
But "Marie Corelli" is nothing if not now and the inventor 
of "startling situations," and so she makes a Satan to 
answer her purpose. And then follows another "thrill," 
for the frail Lady Sibyl determines to commit suicide. She 
cannot survive her love. She had heard her adored one 
call her "a fair fiend," and what love-struck maid could 
calmly suffer her "heart strings" to be thus "torn out" 
and desire to live? But she will not leave the world with- 



out leaving behind her "a statement," and this "state- 
ment" furnishes the reader with many more "thrills;" in 
fact, it is quite a battery of "thrills," and it introduces all 
sorts of things, Swinburne's poetry, the scientific heresies 
of the day, and many other things, all of which ar» sensa- 
tional and full of flush, dramatic situations, and pyrotech- 
nics. All of this is very like "Marie Corelli." But even as 
Lady Sibyl suffers "the tortures of the damned," from the ef- 
fect of the poison, yet she writes on. Her fortitude is he- 
roic. Page after page vanishes under the inspiration of her 
pen as she "writhes" in her death agonies. Here are more, 
many more, splendid "thrills." But at last the light 
comes, for she finds out who Lucio is! She has loved the 
devil, and there is the moral of the story. And as she 
makes the discovery she writes: 

"Serve me, dear hand, once more ere I depart. * * * 
My tortured spirit must seize and compel you to write 
down this unnamable, that earthly eyes may read, and 
earthly souls take timely warning! * * * I know at 
last whom I have loved! — whom I have chosen, whom I 
have worshipped! * * * I know who claims my worship 
and drags me into yonder rolling world of flame." 

This passage gives a fair idea of the general tenor 
of the book, which is full of "situations" and is constantly 
aiming after effect. No doubt the characters are strong, 
but they are stagey, luminous, and more like jacks-in-the- 
box than real men and women. We do not want our 
moral teachers to give us our lessons through literary 
fireworks or to "thrill" us into good behavior by dramatic 
situations as unnatural as they are unreal. We care 
little for the load of adjectives that are flung at us from 
behind the covers of sensational literature, and while we 
admit "Marie Corelli's" gifts as a powerful descriptive 
writer, yet it is the "power" of a thunder storm that 
alarms the unlettered and the savage, but has little effect 
on the cultured and the refined. This may be considered 
disrespectful to Her Britannic Majesty, but such is our 
view of one of her, alleged, favorite authors. 

* ''The Sorrows of Satan," by Marie Corelli. 

Mrs. Campbell-Praed has given us a very old plot in her 
book, "Mrs. Tregaskiss." We can see nothing new in a 
cultured English girl marrying an Australian sheep raiser j 
with whom she has nothing in common, nor is there any- 
thing novel in finding that, as her life at "the station" is j 
dull and her husband unsympathetic, she is tempted to 
desert him for a stranger more congenial to her social . 
aspirations. That story has been told ten thousand times, j 
and we grow weary of the repetition, even under the gifted 
fingers of a brilliant writer. 

Dean Hole's " Little Tour " is a book of impressions of I 
the United States. They embrace an extended tour over 
this country, and we wonder that Dean Hole did not give ' 
his book some other name than "Little Four." On the 
whole the Dean was favorably impressed with America, ' 
but, before he warned young English gentlemen from com- | 
ing to this country to ranch, would it not have been well to 
tell his readers of the many Englishmen who have made 
good homes in California by the very ranching he warns his 
people against. 

" Old World Japan " or " Legends of the Land of the 
Gods " is not an accurate title for a book on Japan. That 
country is no more the "Land of the Gods" than any 
other country with a mythology of its own. Nor do the 
so-called "legends " deserve their name, for there is little, 
if any, legendary lore about them. They tell us nothing 
about the mythology of " Old World Japan," and, while 
the book is not without merit, yet the title is misleading. 

Col. Dodge in his History of Gustavus Adolphus says 
that the great captains who must be models for whomso- 
ever would succeed in the profession of arms were Hannibal, 
Alexander, Caesar, Gustavus Adolphus, Turenne, Prince 
Eugene, and Frederick. All great captains, but we should 
say the Great Six Captains were Alexander, Hannibal, 
Cai-sar. Gustavus Adolphus, Frederick, and Napoleon. 

There were seven hundred books issued from the Amer- 
ican press last year. This does not include reprints, juv- 
enile books, or the great mass of cheap trash, which were 
placed on the market, but it only refers to such books as 
may be expected to command respectful attention. 



aim.iry 1 1 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 1 HIT! K. 



B the ditt' 

■>f the 

every 

possi! .ii^i> ;i great 

He bad a magi strikingly 

that lighted like stars. 

peoplo did not like tl.> - r. I>ut thai 

•.•nt of thi , on Dickens. But it w;i> 

nt with Thockerav. He, too, was a splendid 

r. but Thackeray did not road from his own novi 

If he had. he would in all probability have 
failed. Dickens was alive, and you could almost fancy the 
Djrures be Bpoke for. were on the stage by his side. i>\it 

Thackeray read as a cultured gentleman to a cultured 
audience, and with all his brilliancy he never stirred his 
hearers as Dickens did — never. 

The Chinese department of the British .Museum Library 
contains a single work which occupies no fewer than 5,020 
volumes. It is an encyclopedia of the literature of China, 
covering a period of twenty-eight centuries — from 1000 
B. C. to A. D. 1700. It is written in the Chinese 
language, from copper type cast by Jesuit missionaries. 
by order of the Emperor Kang-he, and it took a commis- 
sion of learned Chinese forty years to complete the work. 



A WOMAN'S WAY. 



w 



HY comes he not? The hour is late, 

He ne'er forgot before ; 
I sit in silence and wait 

His step outside my door. 
I thought for once I would surprise 

That truant love of mine; 
But all untouched the supper lies, 

Unope'd the sparkliDg wine. 

The violets I bought for him 
Are wilting in despair; 

My blushing rose— his foolish whim- 
Is burning in my hair. 

Men are so strange; tbey seldom think 

Of things as women do ; 
They love as they may eat or drink, 

Forgetting all when through. 
We women venture much, it seems, 

On what is merely chance; 
And many hud the blade that gleams 

Behind a lover's glance. 

Can he be false? I still can feel 

His kiss. I hear the vow 
He made that night when he did steal 

The love he turns from now. 

Some say there is a God above, 

And some that it is Fate; 
But hush, his step— his knock! "O Love, 

'Twas wrong to come so late!" 
San Francisco. Howard V. Sutherland. 



Protects Users of "Royal.' 



The decision of Judge Sho waiter in a recent case that came up be- 
fore him sustains the claims of the Royal company to the exclusive 
use of the name "Royal" as a trademark for its baking powder. 
The special importance of this decision consists in the protection 
which it assures to the millions of consumers of Royal baking 
powder against inferior and unwholesome compounds. The ex- 
cellence of this article has caused it to be highly esteemed and largely 
used almost the world over. Its high standard of quality having 
been always maintained, consumers have come to rely implicitly up- 
on the " Royal" brand as the most wholesome and efficient of any in 
the market. The cupidity of other manufacturers is excited by this 
high reputation and large demand. Very few of the hundreds of 
baking powders on the market are safe to use. If their makers 
could sell them under the name of a well-known, reputable brand 
incalculable damage wonld be done to the public health by the de- 
ception. The determination of the Royal Baking Powder Company 
to protect the users of the Royal baking powder against imitators by 
a rigid prosecution of them makes such imitations of its brand 
extremely rare.— Chicago Times-Herald. 



The Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. P. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 



|r?<? <?olor>ial, 



Pine and Jones Sts. 



in.- :m.t floral Ptmllj if. tel In Stn Frmi 

The en 

irlmiiits. sir 

I bath 

i»r in Its ttriitity niiil with nil ttl 

i.i'Dtly. 



SPECIAL RATES 

to permanent guests, Milliard Room, Elevator. 
i lonTenlenl to ell oars. 

MRS. S B. JOHNSON,. 

Southeast corner of Pino and .Jones streets. 

if ^ainornla \\m\ 

Is the only MODERN FIRE-PROOF Hotel in San 

Francisco. 

Its rich and brilliant furnishings and finish (\i\r\ 

will please the ulJt)> 

its Table will tickle the 



and its Charges protect the 



taste, 
pocket book 



of every Guest. Convenient to business centers. 
Close to all car lines. Every room sunny. 
R. 11. Warlield, Proprietor. 



Brool^lyr? 
Jtotel ® » 



Conducted on both the 

European and 
American plan 

Bosh street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F. 

This favorite hotel is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Family and Busi- 
ness Men's Hotel In San Francisco Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, 
first-class service and the highest standard of respeotability guaranteed. 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room: Per day, $1.25, $1.50. $1.75 and $2; per week, $7 to $12; 
per month, $37.50 to $40; single room, 50 cents to $1. 

9S"Free coach to and from the Hotel. 



RIGGS HOUSE 



) Washington, D. C. 
The Hotel " Par Excellence " -=- 

of tbe National Capital. First-class in 
all appointments. O 6. STAPLES, 
President; G. DeWITT, Treas. 



American plan, $3 per dan and upward. 



£bbitt \ious<^, 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 
H C. BTJRCH. Manager. 



POPULAR PRICES— Regular rates. $4 per day up. Fifty rooms 
on the sixth floor with steam heat and electric light, reduced to 
$2 50 and $3 per day. Fifty rooms on other floors reduced from 
$4 to $3 50 per day. Parlors and alcove parlors at equally low 
rates. Special rates for the Army and Navy Officers and the 
Clergy. 



LIDDLE Co. I 
Sportsmen's Goods $ 



110 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco. 



Fine 

Goods 

Cheap. 



Write for atalogue. 



"In the 
Field of 
Sports." 

New book free 



United States Laundry, 



Office: 1004 Market St., near Baldwin. Telephone, South 4-3-0. 




REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January n, 1896. 




rTfeJ^KSS&o 



IN GLAD WEATHER.— charles b. going, in scribner's. 

11)0 not know what skies there were, 
Nor if the wind was high or low ; 
I think I heard the branches stir 

A little, when we turned to go; 
I think I saw the grasses sway 

As if they tried to kiss your feet— 
And yet, it seems like yesterday, 
That day together, sweet! 

I think it must have been in May; 

I think the sunlight must have shone; 
I know a scent of springtime lay 

Across the fields; we were alone, 
We went together, you and I ; 

How could I look beyond your eyes? 
If you were only standing by 

I did not miss the skies I 

I could not tell if evening glowed. 

Or noonday heat lay white and still 
Beyond the shadows of the road; 

I only watched your face, until 
I knew it was the gladdest day, 

The sweetest day that summer knew— 
The time when we two stole away 

And I saw only you ! 



LITTLE BOPEEP-LITTLE BOY SLUE-samuel m/nturn peck. 

It happened one morning that Little Bopeep 
While watching her frolicsome, mischievous sheep 
Out in the meadow, fell fast asleep. 

By her wind-blown tresses and rose-leaf pout, 

And her dimpling smile, you'd have guessed, no doubt, 

'Twas love, love, love, she was dreaming about. 

As she lay (here asleep came Little Boy Blue, 
Bight over the stile where the daisies grew; 
Entranced by the picture he stopped in the dew. 
So wildly bewitching that beautiful morn, 
Was Little Bopeep that he dropped his horn 
And thought no more of the cows in the corn. 

Our sorrows are many, our pleasures are few; 
O moment propitious I What could a man do? 
He kissed the wee lassie, that Little Boy Blue! 

Ac the smack the woolies stood all in a row, 

And whispered each other, " We're clearly de trop ; 

Such conduct is perfectly shocking— let's go! " 



SONG.— WILLIAM WATSON, IN LONDON SPECTATOR. 

O like a queen's her happy tread, 
And like a queen's her golden head ! 
But O, at last, when all is said. 

Her woman's heart for me ! 

We wandered where the river gleamed 
'Neath oaks that mused and pines that dreamed, 
A wild thing of the woods she seemed, 
So proud, and pure, and free ! 

All heaven drew nigh to hear her sing, 
When from her lips her soul took wing ; 
The oaks forgot their pondering, 
The pines their reverie. 

And O, her happy queenly tread, 
And O, her queenly golden head ' 
But O, her heart, when all is said, 
Her woman's heart for me! 



THE DIFFERENCE.-^, s. 



Silly fool, 'tis in vain you pursue, 

She heeds not the words that you say ! 

Can't you see, as you fruitlessly woo, 

That her thoughts are with one who's away? 

That tho' far all her love he commands 

Of which you can have not the least part? 

You are near, you can touch her dear hands; 
He is nearer— he touches her heart. 




Out of sorts 

— no wonder. Think of the 
v~j\ condition of those women who 
v have to wash clothes and 

clean house in the 
old-fashioned way. 
They're tired, vexed, 
discouraged, out of 
sorts, with aching backs 
and hearts — out of their 
wits, too. Why not use Pearline? That's 
what every woman who values health and 
strength is coming to. And coming to it 
faster than ever. Every day, Pearline' s fame 
grows and its patrons increase in number. «i 

WINTER CRUISES 

TO THE MEDITERRANEAN AND THE ORIENT. 

The Hamburg-American Line's 

TWIN-SCREW EXPRESS S. S. FUERST BISMARCK, 

will leave New York January 28, 1896, for Madeira, Gibraltar, Algiers, Ge- 
noa, Nice, Tunis. Alexandria (for Cairo and the Pyramids), Jaffa {for 
Jerusalem), Smyrna, Constantinople. Athens, Malta, Messina, Palermo, 
Naples, Genoa. New York, duration about ten weeks. Also, 

WINTER CRUISE TO THE WEST INDIES 
and the Spanish Main. The Hamburg-American Line's TWIN-SCREW 
EXPRESS S. S. COLUMBIA will leave New York January 25, 1896, for 
Port au Prince (Hayti). Mayaguez (Porto Rico), St Thomas, St. Kitts, 
Antigua, Guadaloupe. Martinique. St. Lucia, Barbados, Trinidad, La Gua- 
yara (for Caracas. Venezuela), and Puerto Cabello, Kingston (Jamaica), 
Havana, New York, duration about four and a half weeks. This is the 
first time a Transatlantic liner (about four times as large as an ordinary 
W. I. Liner) with all its comforts is offered on this route. 

NEW ROUTE TO LONDON AND PARIS. 
Twin-Screw Express Steamer Service— NEW YORK to PLYMOUTH 
(London). CHERBOURG (Paris) aDd HAMBURG. For further particulars 
apply to HAMBURG AMERICAN LINE, 37 Broadway. New York. 
A. W.MYER, 4U1 California St., cor. Sansome, San Francisco. 

The New California Insect Exterminator. Clears out Moths. Fleas, Ants, 
Roaches, Bed-Bugs. Mites on birds, chickens, etc. Contains NO POISON. 



Never Falls. 



Eucalyptus Powder 



Never Fails. 



Made from the concentrated extract of the blue gum leaves. Creates no 
disagreeable odor. Each package equal In power to one-half pound of ordi- 
nary insect powder or tar balls Price, ten cents per package, $1 per doz. 
Sent postpaid to any address on receipt of price in postage stamps. Ener- 
getic persons wanted to act as State or county agents. Big inducements 
offered reliable parties. Address all orders and communications to the 
sole manufacturers, 

CALIFORNIA PRODUCTION CO., 

328 Seventh St., San Francisco, Cal. 



UP-TO-DATE 

At Moderate Prices. 



Tailorlno 



J. H. HAWES, 

Mezzanine B , Crocker Building. (Up one half flight fronting on Post St.) 



Brandt & Go. 



FINE TAILORING 
139 Montgomery St. 



np RirriRrVC: RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
Ut\. T\\i^i\jr\U O (ne— A specific Tor Exhausted Vitality, Phystoal 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 5u pills, Jl 25; of 100 pills, 88; of 300 pills, 
$3 60; ot4O0pllls,$6; Preparatory Pills. $2, Send for circular. 




GIGrtR. 



The latest and the best brand out. 



January ll, 1896. 



>.\N FRANCISCO NEWS 1.1. i 







SBE— I wish you wouldn't smoke thai cigarette in my 
nee. UK— Then 111 throw it away. Sm 1 
I didn't mean that Life. 

man who had dismounted from ln> 
ayside inn and left the animal in charge of 
ad urchin. But on returning he found ai 
holding hi> horse. He scanned the little destitute 
- and exclaimed: "Well, but you're 
pot the boy 1 left my horse with!" "No, sir." said the 
I ji.-t speckilated, and bought im of t' other boy for 
a ha'penny." The boy received a " threepenny " for his 
Straightforwardness. — Tid-Bits. 

She never knew be drank 

Beer, brandy, wine ur rum ; 
She knew he'd be a man 

And not a drunken bum. 
She knew he did not drink 

And told the reason why- 
She noticed every morning, 
He was 90 awtul dry. — Peck's Sun. 

His Wife — Algernon! Run for the doctor, quick! 
Baby's just suffering- awful with the colic! The artist — 
Er — wait a minute till I sketch him. That is the very at- 
titude I have been trying to get for my next magazine 
poster. — Indianapolis Journal. 

"I had a long argument with D'gby this morning," said 
the controversial man, "and I convinced him." " So he 
told me." "Ha! he acknowledged it to you, did he?" 
" Yes. He said that he'd rather be convinced than talked 
to death, any day." — Fun. 

Pat — Hello, Mike, oi hear yez have a noo job? Mike — 
Shure I have, Pat. Pat — And how are they all up yure 
way? Mike — Everybody's sick. Pat — Aye, aye! That's 
too bad. man! Mike — Oh no; I'm working at Bellevue! — 
Harper's Bazar. 

Judge — What's the charge? Policeman — Drunk, your 
honor. Judge (to prisoner) — What's your name? Prisoner 
— John Gunn. Judge — Well, Gunn, I'll discharge you this 
time, but you musn't get loaded again. — Texas Sittings. 
Men raise their sons in idleness, 

Although their means be scanty. 
But frequently you find a man 
Who's had to raise his aunty. 

— New York Kecorder. 

Judge — What extenuating circumstances can you give? 

Counterfeiter — Please, your honor, I made the money to 

pay for my lodgings. Judge — "Very good; it v ill pay for 

your board and lodgings for the next five years. — Tit-Bits. 

May — They tell me your engagement with Charlie 
Gumpleigh is broken. How did it happen? Carrie — It 
is no great mystery. The fact is, he was too fresh to 
keep; that's all. — Boston Transcript. 

He — There's a superstition about this conservatory. 
They say no man ever took a girl in here that he didn't 
kiss her before he left. She (demurely) — I've never had 
any reason to doubt it. — Truth. 

Muggins — Wigwatr is in very heavy mourning for his 
wife, isn't he? Buggins — Yes; he carries it to extremes. 
I met him on the street to-day, and he even gave me a 
black look. 

He — What would you think, dear, if I should say 3'ou 
were a harp of a thousand strings? She — I should think, 
love, that you were a lyre. — Town and County Journal. 

"Mamma, didn't the preacher say that the natives of 
Gongalooloo wore no clothes? " "Yes, darling." "Then 
why did papa put a button in the bag ? " — Punch. 

Doolan — Fitzgerald says he's discinded from some of 
the greatest houses in Ireland. Mulcahy — Musha! So 
he did many's the toime — on a laddher. — Puck. 

Baron — Show me the most startling thing you have. 
Tailor— Certainly. Mr. Baron, you shall see your bill in 
a moment. — Fligende Blatter. 



Wrong chimney, bad lamp 
— no matter what lamp v.. 1 
have. Y >u want the " In 

1 I in n \ " — free, 

Write ( !eo A Macbeth Co, 
Pittsburgh, Pa, maker of 
"pearl glass" and pearl top." 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

For the ball rear ending Der 81, IBOS. b dividend tins been deotared ut the 

tour and thlrty-twi hundreathn 1 1 :<■.'- i«ii percent. per ;mutinion 

term deposits and three and sixty one hundredths. (8 60100) per cent, per 
annum on ordinary deposits, rree ol taxes payable on and afte. W< Im 
day, January 1, 1896 Dividends nol called tor are added to and bear the 
samerateof dividend :is the principal, rrom and after January 1, 1806. 

CYRUS W. CAK'MANY. Cashier. 
_ Office— 10] Montgomery sti 1. corner suiu-r, S:nj Francis ' !ai. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending Ueoember 81st, 1895, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the ratH of four and twenty-six one hundredths (4 26-100) per cent 
per annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty Ave one hundredths 
(:l 55-11X1) per cent, per annum ou Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after Thursday, January 2, 1896 

Ofllce— 5 26 California s treet. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of cue Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Dec. 3U, 1895. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (1) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six mouths ending December 31, 1895, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and after January 2,J896. ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Montgomery-St. Coffee and Lunch House. Good coffee and fresh eggs 
a specialty. Cream waffles. 436 Montgomery St. H. H. H.TUL, Prop. 

Cafe Royal, Fourth and Market streets, S. F. Oysters and lunches 
s erved in private rooms. Entra nce on Pioneer Court, Home made tamales. 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a uox of ROBERTS' Best. 

MEDICAL 
A Sovereign Remedy— DR. PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. Try it. Price 36c. 

George Dahlbender & Co., 214 Kearny street. 
Dr. R. Elmer Bunker has removed to 630 Sutter street. 

Office Hours: 1 to 3 and 6:30 to 7:30 P. M. 

Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Thomas L. Hill, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows* Building, southwest corner Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours : 4 to 5. 
Dr. H. G. Young, 

Bridges and teeth without plates. 1841 Polk street. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 
Joseph Greven, Vocal Teacher, Neumann Piano Store, 82 Ninth St. , S. F. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 
Neuhaus & Co., 115 Kearny, up-stairs. Suits to order $12 50. Over- 
coats, $10. Pants $4 and upwards. Samples by mail. 
flSr A perfect fit guaranteed. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

J. fl. W. Lundborg, Dentist, 

336 POST STREET, Rooms 2-3. (Opposite Union Square 
Telephone 2275. San Francisco. 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 



819 Market street 



QR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 



409!^ Post St., San Francisco. 



Dentist. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January n, 1896. 



3 © ©<?«»* 




DEAR EDITH: — As I said last week, extravagance 
grows apaee. It takes an artist nowadays to design 
a gown, and a full purse to pay for it. A ball-dress for 
instance — filmy gauzes, figured with colors which would be 
the envy of Watteau or Fragoninere; exquisite chiffous in 
rainbow tints; dainty Louis Quinze taffetas; — it all involves 
artistic genius to make the combination. 

The mandolin sleeve, with the fullness drooping below 
the elbow, and the full bishop sleeve gathered into a 
colonial cuff, are the two most popular styles. Although 
the sleeve is beginning to cling to the arm more and more, 
the fullness receding to the top, fitted to the figure in 
small flat pleats. 

Skirts are as full as ever. The panel front of a different 
material with overlapping sides has become the swagger 
style. The front is made of a straight width, folded over 
to form a wide box-pleat. As a rule the skirt is fitted 
closely to the hips. 

The hats and bonnets this season are as gorgeous as 
ever. What with splendid velvet hats crowded with 
fluffy plumes and flashing buckles or iridescent beads and 
gaudy bows, life in the beau monde is expensive. 

Persian ribbon in its strange, Oriental tints are used at 
very extreme width. Then there are capots of wrought 
gold-net with mercury wings of lustrous metallic shimmer. 

And, by the way, speaking of underwear, we have at 
last a perfect corset. It's called the : 'R. & G.," and you 
can get it in over a hundred different patterns. It lasts 
till "doomsday;" but the chief reason why I like it so 
much is that it adapts itself at once to each particular 
curve of the figure, and does not cost any more than the 
others. 

The New Berthas are very artistic, and as usual flowers 
are still very popular. One which is composed of grace- 
ful sprays of Locust-blossoms — yellow — goes well with 
black tulle. Light green leaves add to the charming 
effect. 

Then there are the lace Berthas which are studded with 
imitation gems that are brilliant in either black or white 
lace. 

Poplin in gay plaid tartans is growing in favor more 
and more every day, and they make an effective combina- 
tion. 

Velvet, of course, still serves for capes and coats, as 
well as gowns. The tasteful Louis Quinze coats are very 
attractive when made of the striped material. 

Petticoats are another luxury nowadays, and black- 
taffeta or satin is the rule, but for receptions and evening 
wear, all sorts of colors in taffeta and Chiua silk or bro- 
cades are in vogue. 

Eight or ten little ruffles, cut in leaf points, and over- 
lapping each other, are pretty, and they are managed so 
as to alternate with pleatings of white or black lace — 
verily a gown in itself. 

To be really swell, one must have a skirt to match the 
silk-lining of every costume in her wardrobe, so as not to 
make the difference noticeable. 

The flaring Marie de Medici and the officers' collars with 
flat bands figure quite prominently, and often they are 
combined. The high inside collar is fastened tightly about 
the throat, the Marie de Medici collar being made of lace 
or velvet and carefully wired out to make a graceful 
frame for a beautiful face. Belinda. 



THE sudden and sad death of Charles K. Shattuck, the 
junior member of the firm of E. J. Shattuck & Co., 
last month, has not interrupted the business of this well 
known house, over which the deceased partner presided so 
successfully for fifteen years. Mr. E. J. Shattuck, his 
brother, has just returned from the East, and is renewing 
his old friendships with San Francisco's business men. His 
extensive commercial affairs in New York are in excellent 
shape, and the energy which he has exerted heretofore in 
the management of his affairs will not be relaxed. 



Corsets! 



M 
TO 

S66 

TH6in. 



Guarantee a perfect fit and grace- 
ful appearance to any variety of 
figure, and are comfortable and 
durable. 

Made in short, long, extra long and 
extremely long waists; four, five, 
and six-hcok clasps. 
We take pleasure in recommend- 
ing W. B., for the fit and wear of 
which we hold ourselves responsi- 
ble. We cheerfully and promptly furnish a new pair 
in all cases of dissatisfaction from an}' cause. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



MME. MflRGnftND'S GREME DE Lft GREME. 



A delightful preparation 
for preserving and beau- 
tifying the complexion. 

Awarded diploma at Me- 
chanics' Fair. 1895, for 
superior merit. 

Samples of Creme de la 
Creme given away. 




Endorsed by 

W. T. W>nzell,M.D., Ph.G. 

Ph M. 
Wm. M. Searby, Ph.C. 
C F.Jones, Ph.C. 
C, A. Climon, M.D., ex- 
member Board of Health, 
G. W Gerlach.Pn.G. M.D 
W M. Logan, Ph.G. M. D 

Dr Licuau, 

Dr. Murphy, and others. 



MME. MARCH AND, Hair and Complexion Specialist, 

Rooms 30 to -11. 12! Post St. Taber's entrance. Telephone 1349. 
Send for booklet. 



ft 

Well 

Dressed 
Woman 



Should have 

Fashionable Modes, Well Fitting, 
Perfect in Workmanship and 
Elegant Finish. 

I furnish these requisites. 

Mrs. ft. J. Bradley, M ° dlst «> 

313 Geary St . San Francisco. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners. dyers, hour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-haugers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F Tel. 5610. 




For the best value in 

HATS or CAPS 
Go to 

6. Herrmann & Go. 

Tne Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 

Near Pine. (Entire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 



January 1 1, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NI\\> I.F.T1 




IK bicycling is an excellent preventive of disease and a 
promoter of good health, it is of no less value as a remedy 
rtatn pathological conditions, says Dr. Henry J. 
Oarrigues, in the January Forum. By its elTeet on respir- 
ation ami digestion, bicycling becomes a potent remedy 
for nnamia. that condition of the Wood which consists in a 
diminution of the red blood-corpuscles, and shows itself in 
pallor of the skin and the mucous membranes. Numerous 
nervous troubles are relieved or cured by this exercise; 
such as neurasthenia, or nervous prostration. — a condition 
usually due to overwork or worry, and in which the 
normal strength is lost, and the slightest exertion causes 
fatigue and physical and mental exhaustion. The same 
holds good in regard to headache, insomnia, and neuralgia. 
Among the nervous affections benefited by bicycle-riding 
may also be included that troublesome disease, asthma, a 
cramp-like contraction of the muscles of the bronchial 
tubes, which causes a painful sensation of choking. In 
the beginning of phthisis, where parts of the lung tissue 
become condensed and less perviousf moderate bicycle- 
riding is helpful. Many diseases of the intestinal canal — 
such as dyspepsia, constipation, and hemorrhoids — 
yield to the effects of wheeling. A case has recently come 
to the writer's knowledge in which the stiffness remaining 
after a fracture of the leg was successfully treated by rid- 
ing a bicycle. 

But if bicycling is a valuable resource iu certain dis- 
eased conditions, there are numerous others in which it is 
harmful or should only be indulged iu very cautiously. 
Most acute diseases demand rest, and bid the bicyclist ab- 
stain from his favorite pursuit; and many chronic diseases 
are made worse by riding. Since wheeling considerably 
increases the rate of the respiratory movements it would 
be folly for a person with advanced pulmonary consump- 
tion to attempt to ride. The heart being whipped un- 
mercifully to work in driving the machine, wheeling should 
be strictly forbidden in serious diseases of this organ; and 
persons affected with minor cardiac troubles ought at 
least never to race or otherwise expose the heart to a 
fatigue which it is not prepared to stand. 

Last winter the New York Legislature enacted a law 
for the benefit of Niagara County, providing for an annual 
tax of 50 cents on every bicycle, the money to be used for 
the building of cinder paths and improving the roads 
generally for wheelmen. Under this law the board of 
supervisors appoints two commissioners, who must be 
wheelmen and serve without pay, to supervise the con- 
struction of the bicycle roads. Such action as this shows 
to what an extent the use of the bicycle may be expected 
to affect even legislation in this country, and the best of 
the whole thing is that whatever influence the 
bicycle has exerted in the past and may be expected to 
exist in the future in a public way can only be in the line 
of what is good and useful. 

Cycling Signals. — French wheelmen have adopted a 
code of signals oy whistle. The whistle is much used in 
France in preference to the bell. Following are a few of 
the signals used: 

Ordinary alarm, three short notes: . 

Halt, one long-drawn note: . 

Come ahead or follow me, to long notes: . 

"Where are you?" or "We are here," three half-long 
notes: . 

Turn to the right, one long drawn note, one short: 



Turn to the left, one long drawn note, two short: 

Lookout 1 there is danger ahead, ten sharp notes in 
quick succession: — . 

Call for help, three short and one long note, several 
times in succession: • 



ami prosp< history on 

. this 

areer 
K Martllng, 
manager of the Pa 
clflc <'oa-t branch of 
the Syracuse Bicycle 
pany. Two years 
ago in- opened busi- 
ness in < Oakland at 

In? San Pablo Ave.. 

and had an Immedi- 
ate and extensive 

patronage, in fact, 
so much so that re- 
cently lie lias taken 
up tin' spacious quar- 
ters at l'l'I Sutter 
street, which are 
tinted to suit, the 
beautiful c r i xa s on 

shade nf the Syracuse 
Bicycle. Mr. Mart- 
ling is a member of 
many clubs on this 
CLARENCE VAETLING coast, among others 

.1 Prominent Oawand Clubman. of the Bay City, the 

Reliance, and Lakeside Tennis, besides being an active 
factor in the Alameda County Good Roads Association. 

The winter bicycle season is in full swing, and all over 
the State bicycle clubs, with captains, lieutenants, and 
sub-officers are being organized. In fact, we should have 
a splendid bicycle corps for our militia in case of war. J. 
M. Litchfield, the tailor, at 12 Post street, has supplied 
the soldier-like shoulder-straps which all the corps have 
adopted here. 

"It is particularly hard that the price of camphor 
should be forced up so high this year, of all others, when 
there are so many pairs of bloomers to be preserved." 

There is no occasion for the citizens of San Francisco to go to the 
beach for a salt water bath when they can be accommodated with 
such excellent provisions as are made at the Lurline Baths, situated 
at the corner of Bush and Larkin streets. These baths are open sum- 
mer and winter, and are furnished with hot and cold water for tub 
bathing or a swim. They furnish health, comfort, and amusement. 
Open at six o'clock a. m. for early bathers. Fresh salt water pumped 
every evening at 10:30. 




BARNES 1 



iiia&Miiaa 




THE WHITE RTM1ED HUMMER IS THE COMER 



HOOKER & CO. 

Retail Store-No. 1640 Market Street. 
Cyclery—Cor. Page and Stan/an Streets. 
Wholesale Dep't— 16-18 Drumm Street, S. F. 

COAST AGENTS FOR 



ARNE 

I CYCLE 



Does your 



Root Need Repair? 

We will examine it without cost, and give 
estimate for putting in good order, and 
keeping it so for a term of years. 

Paraffine Paint Co. M^^eT 1 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January n, 1896. 



THINGS TO THINK OF. 

Only one person in a thousand dies of old age. 

Rice forms the chief food of about a third of the human 
race. 

A needle will float if carefully placed upon the surface 
of a basin of water. 

The weight of blood in the adult human body averages 
from twenty-five to thirty-five pounds. 

The statement has been made, and seems incredible, 
that all the gold in the world would fit in a room twenty- 
four feet each way. 

Gold is yellow only by reflected light. If a leaf of gold, as 
ordinarily used by gilders, be placed between two pieces of 
glass, and held up to the light, it will be seen to transmit 
a brilliant green light. 

If a delicate piece of lace be placed between au iron 
plate and a disk of gunpowder, and the latter be exploded 
the lace will be utterly destroyed, but its impression will 
be clearly stamped on the iron. 

There are no less than twenty-eight bones in one hand 
and wrist, and about as many in a foot and an ankle. 
The bones of the hand and feet are equal in number to one- 
half of all the bones in the human body. 

An ordinary spider thread is capable of bearing a 
weight of three grains, while a steel thread of the same 
thickness would support less than two. 

The greatest inland sea is the Caspian, which is seven 
hundred miles long by two hundred and seventy in width. 

An Oriental method of detecting crime is to take 
several persons suspected of the offense and require them 
to chew dry wheat. The nervous fears of the guilty man 
seal up his salivary glands, and he chokes in attempting 
to reduce the grain to pulp. 

The starfish fastens itself to the body it wishes to feed 
on, turns its stomach inside out, and enwraps its prey 
with this useful organ. 

One of the best remedies for a burn is Carron oil, a 
mixture of equal parts of linseed or olive oil with lime 
water. Another admirable remedy is bicarbonate of soda 
— that is, cooking soda — a small box of which should al- 
ways be kept at hand for immediate use. 

Every soldier knows that a horse will not step on a 
man intentionally. It is a standing order in the British 
cavalry if a trooper becomes dismounted he must lie still. 
If he does this the whole squadron will pass over him with- 
out doing him injury. 

The most valuable fur in the world is that from the 
belly of the Russian silver fox. The color is black, with 
here and there a tip of silver. The fur is used exclusively 
for linings, and though exceedingly warm, is so light that 
the material for a whole coat or cloak only weighs but a 
few ounces. The black fur of the silver fox is also valuable, 
but is used for trimmings and outside wear. — Colliers 
Weekly. 

THE MIDGET OF PLANT LIFE. 

THE midget of the whole tree family is the Greenland 
birch. It is a perfect tree in every sense of that 
term, and lives its allotted number of years (from seventy- 
five to one hundred and thirty), says St, Louis Republic, 
just as other species of the great birch family do, although 
its height, under the most favorable conditions, seldom 
exceed ten inches. "Whole bluffs of the east and southeast 
coast of Greenland are covered with "thickets" of this 
diminutive species of woody plant, and in many places, 
where the soil is uncommonly poor and frozen from eight 
to ten months a year, a "forest" of these trees will flourish 
for half a century without growing to a height exceeding 
four inches. 



Kentucky is famous for its Bourbon whiskies, and its brands are 
numerous. Among those that have stood the test of time and use is 
the celebrated J. P. Cutter. The best judges have declared it to be 
the most excellent in the market. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market 
street, are the agents for this celebrated brand, for which they have 
established a large trade. They are also agents for the Argonaut 
brand of Kentucky Bourbon. 



BANKING. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, $300,000. 

OFFICERS 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. I S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Ptaelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital .$1,250,000 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

James K. Wilson President. C. F. A. Talbot, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill, Cashier. 

Directors— C S. Benedict, Charles Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, 
Wm. P. Johnson, C F. A. Talbot. James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics" Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash. $1,000,000. Reserve Fund $ 715,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1895 $30,727,586 50. Guaranteed Capital. .$1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, B. A. Becker; Vice-President, Edward Kruse; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistanl 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney. W. S. Goodfellow. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS. 

Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S, Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Lincoln. 



CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cob. market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital S1,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Cnas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND Secretary 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Franoisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest Improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 
OAT EM T8. AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PATENTS. 

B00NE> & MURDOGK, (E. F. Murdock. Jno.L. Boone). 

San Francisco Office: Nucleus Building, Cor. Market and Third Sts. 
Washington Office: Opposite Patent Office. 



January n. t8<)fV 



SAX FRANCISCO NHWS III 



«3 




ft DUEL wit it been regarded without 

..»r. It is true one took place between tw 
tlomen, but it is thought the dueling laws have 
France, and it is not the thins to break them. 
A duel with sabres is im| ossible between Frenchmen; it is 
_-iit barbaric; the rapier is consequently thi 
• that can be used. A Frenchman is authorized to 
a duel with any other weapon than the rapier or 
It is true the sabre is used for dueling in Spain 
a nd in some parts of Italy, also in Austria. Germany, and 
Russia: thus the majority seems to be in its favor. 

Queens often find themselves in a dilemma when they 

have to receive repugnant persons. Queen Margherita of 
Italy is a devout Catholic, and holds very strict views on 
marriage. When Crispi came to power his first wife was 
still alive, as was also the first husband of his second wife 
At first the Queen stoutly refused to admit Donna Lina to 
court, and a tremendous storm ensued. Her Majesty. 
however, had to give w ay. aud her words on the occasion 
were: "All right! tell Signor Crispi I will receive his wife; 
but I will receive only oni of them, and I insist it must al- 
ways be the same one.' 

Speaker Reed is a changed man. He is no longer 

the snapping, snarling, sarcastic person that he used to 
be. Whether this revolution in his manner has been caused 
by the increase of the fatty matter of his physical struc- 
ture, or by the cutting off of his mustache, or by policy 
dictated by his Presidential aspirations, is a question. We 
concede that it is to the interest of the House that Reed 
should play the part of an amiable man; but we don't be- 
lieve that it is going to help him in his candidacy. — Rich- 
mond Dispatch. 

Lucy Cleveland, in a letter to the New York Re- 
corder, reveals the fact that Amelie Rives wrote "Accord- 
ing to St. John " for the purpose of defraying expenses due 
a French surgical scientist for remedying deformity of fea- 
tures in the face of a gifted but poor lady friend of hers. 
The surgeon's bill was $6000, and that amount was paid 
Miss Rives for her story by The Cosmopolitan. 

In several of the mountain cantons of Switzerland a 

bride receives a most prosaic and curious wedding gift, a 
Gruyere cheese. It is made by the bride's girl friends, 
and is of great size. In the new house it is put under a 
glass case and never eaten. Every important family event 
is recorded on the rind, so that it serves as a familv Bible. 

The crusaders against rice-throwing at weddings, 

who have the sedate support of the Lancet, now have the 
law upon their side. A London magistrate has decided that to 
throw rice at a newly-married man for luck amounts to an 
assault. 

It has been decided by an Ohio court that wives are 

legally responsible for the support of their husbands when 
the husbands cannot furnish the support. Of course the 
new woman will agree to this. 

The Sacred Congregation of Rites at Rome has issued 

a decree forbidding bishops approving the constitution and 
by-laws of any society that has not some religious or moral 
purpose in view. 

His Father — Charles, it's time you were fitting for 
college. Charles — I was going to speak to you about 
that matter, pa. I think about four new suits would just 
about fix me all right for a starter, or, say, three at 
least. There's nothing like being thoroughly fitted, pa, 
is there? — Roxbury Gazette. 

The Grand Canyon Line 1 — To the East. 
The "Santa Fe Route " Popular Overland Excursions to Chicago 
and Eastern cities will leave every Wednesday. Manager in charge. 
Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are run to Chicago 
every day, This is the only Line by which the Grand Canyon of the 
Colorado River can be reached. Send for illustrated book giving 
full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. G. P. A., 644 Market St., Chronicle 
Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



BANKING. 
BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. IMS. 

Capital Paid Up.tS.ono.OW EUMTTO Fund and Undivided Profits. 11,1*1,010 

■ -it Hrsn am- BAI 

BB AD OFFICE 80 XjOMBABD Stkkft. LoroOM 

BfLurcras— victoria. Vanoouvor, NVw Westminster. Kam loops. Nan 
laroo. .1 Miu; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta 

Hanking Business. Accounts opened nub- 
and Special Dopoalta received Oommarolal Credit* : 
i ; purts <>f ttte world. Approved mils discounted nnd ad- 

> runty. Draws direct at current niles 
upon Its Head Office and Branches. and u] ■ . us follows : 

n t v^ York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago -Flrai National Bank; 

LIVERPOOL— North and South Wales Bank ; SCOTLAND— Mrilisl- I 

Company; Ireland— Bank ol Ireland; Mvxico— London Hank of ,m 
Sooth AmaiCA—Lo oo and South America; china and 

Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New ZEALAND— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld; Demeraha nnd Tuimdad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October 1, 1894).. 3.158,139 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President | CHARLES R. BISHOP. . Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moolton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, June 30, 1895 $24,303,873 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,643,277 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or en trance fee. Office hours — 9. a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve $375,000 

San Francisco Ofllce— 124 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St. 
Portland Branch— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER I Ass't Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAVFRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. w. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 82,500,000 | Paid Up Capital t2,000,000 

Reserve Fund J800.0O0 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direot on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENBAUM) «„„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHUL } Managers. 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $250,000. Cash Reserve Fund, $25,000. 
L. R. ELLERT. Manager. 
This company loans money on real estate and transacts a general trust 
business. It also makes and continues abstracts of title and Issues guar- 
antee policies which protect the holder against loss. 
OFFICE— Mills Building. San Francisco. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts, 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 I Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART 1 Mana „ Ars 

P. N. LILIENTHAL; managers. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January n, 1896. 








STAINING WOOD BLACK.— A process that is much 
employed for the ubove purpose consists in painting 
the wood consecutively with copper sulphate solution (1 per 
cent) and alcoholic aniline acetate (equal parts of alcohol 
and acetate.) A very durable black — and the nearest ap- 
proach to real ebony — is readily obtained by moistening 
the surface of the wood with dilute sulphuric acid (1:20) 
and subsequently applying heat. A temperature of 60 dog. 
— 90 deg. C, suffices in a very few minutes to produce the 
desired result. An excellent black was obtained in this 
way on beech, bass, and boxwood; while a second treat- 
ment with acid was necessary in the case of cherry, wal- 
nut, and birch. With oak and ash the results were not so 
good; and apple, and different varieties of pine, were still 
less amenable to the process, pine especially being un- 
evenly stained. In order to afterward remove the acid 
from the wood, it might be well to thoroughly wash the 
latter with dilute soda solution, followed by clean water. 
It is unlikely that this method can be applied to any but 
small articles, because of the risk of possible fractures dur- 
ing the necessary heating of the wood. — Badische Gewerbe- 
Zei thing. 

How to "Salt" Almonds. — To prepare salted almonds, 
blanch them by pouring boiling water over them and rub- 
bing the brown skin off with a rough cloth. When they 
are blanched and quite dry measure them, and over each 
cupful of nuts pour a tablespoonful of the best olive oil. 
Let them stand for an hour, and then sprinkle a table- 
spoonful of salt over each cupful, mixing it thoroughly. 
Spread them out on a flat tin pan, aud put them in a not 
too hot oven until they have become a delicate brown. — 
Ladies' Home Journal. 

Imported Cements. — " Why do we import cements in- 
stead of making all we use? '' The answer is simple as 
rolling off a log. The average price abroad — say in Bel- 
gium — is only $1 39 per barrel. We can't make it for the 
price. True, good cements are made in this country for 
even less than that, but they are mostly plain hydraulic 
(lime) cements, and not to be compared with "Portland." 
— American Homes. 

Obe and Shipbuilding Material. — Cleveland dis- 
patches report that the navigation on the lakes, just 
closed, has broken all records both in the movement of ore 
and ship-building material. The consumption of steel thus 
far this year has exceeded all calculations. It is estimated 
that the quantity of ore being consumed this year is almost 
double what it was a year ago. 

Oils. — New linseed oil is unfit for painting; it should be 
at least six months old, and is better if kept for several 
years. By storing the oil in tanks the water and mucilage 
are precipitated as a paste called " foots." Oil is bleached 
on a large scale by placing it in shallow troughs lined with 
lead and covered with glass. The lead aids in the decolora- 
tion. 

Liquid Glue. — According to German authority, a new 
and excellent liquid glue is made by dissolving gelatin in a 
solution of chloral hydrate in water. Ordinary glue may 
replace the gelatin for ordinary use. This cement is said 
to dry quickly, to have great adhesiveness, and to remain 
unchanged indefinitely. 

Gasoline Engines. — Not only has the gasoline engine 
proved superior to electrical appliances on motor ear 
riages, but it is now claimed that street cars propelled in 
much the same way will come to supersede in lime the 
present electric cars, experts saying that such cars can 
be run at a cost of one cent a horse power per mile. 

The finest line of custom-ruade furnishing goods for gentlemen 
such as shirts, collars, cuff's, neckties and underwear, can he found 
at John W. Carmany's, 25 Kearny street. He also keeps the latest 
styles of ladies' shirts. 



Mothers, be sure and use ' 
children while teething 



Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 
309 and 311 Sansome St. .... s an Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

PDERST BROS. & CO 2 and 4 Stone St., New York 

INSURANCE. 



PIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 

PHENIX INS. CO. OF BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Assets, $5,783,243 Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,661,401 

THE AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $607,627 

PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Assets ,098,77* Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,889,252 

THE SVEA FIRE INS. CO. OF GOTHENBURG 

Assets, $5,493,831 Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,083,321 

Pacific Department, 407-409 Montgomery street. 

BROWN, CRAIG & CO., Managers. 



Assets, $2,296,083 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F. 

FlKE INSDHANCE. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 8.192,001 w 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,506,409 1 1 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 401 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF AIX LA 'CHAPELLE, GERMANY. : Established 1825 

Capital, $2,250,001. Total Assets, $6,854,653 65 

UNITED STATE EPARTMENT: 204 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Es > bl <^ » 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated "» 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California st , S F. 



George L Hall, 



Agent and importer of 



FOREIGN WINES. 



MUTUAL LIFE BUILDING, 222 Sansome St . 



January 1 1 



SAN PRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»J 



THE SUMMONS CAME TOO LATE. 



ft[!ENHMENT room a I Earl's Court Enter Mrs 
and Mas Ormerod. the tables, a 

youngmai olently, halt 1 take- of! his 

hat. Mrs. Ormerod eyes liim with an Impertinent stare, 
and Miss Ormerod looks fixedly at the wall beyond him. The 
young man hastily resumi .1 When they have 

foun.i distance and ordered refreshment, 

the ladies give vent to their Indignation. 
I. aura, of all the Impudent—" 
■ Mr Marston never was noted for his modesty, mother." 

'• I should think not. but London is the place to bring 
bim to his senses. He'll soon find bis level here." 

1 1 wonder what he is doing '.' He seems well dressed 
ounter-iumping or shop-lifting, I should imagine. 
That's all he's tit for. 

" He could waltz divinely. 

'"Then he had one redeeming virtue. Perhaps he teaches 
dancing." 

As the band outside ceases playing, sundry people 
saunter in. 

" Why. there's Sir William! I do hope he'll see us." 

" Why doesu't the man look this way '!" 

•If he isn't talking to Mr. Marston I How flattered that 
young man must feel! " 

" Perhaps he is ordering a new coat." 

" Or, more likely, complaining about the old one. " 

" I hope he is arranging for some dancing lessons. He 
waltzes horribly." 

"You could forgive that if he were only good-looking." 

" At any rate, he is very good-natured." 

" Or he wouldn't be talking to young Marston." 

" At last he sees us!" 

The ladies bow gracefully. Sir William walks across to 
them. 

"Now, whoever would have thought of meeting you 
here? 

" How badly expressed, Sir William! An 'unexpected 
pleasure ' would have sounded so much better." 

' ' I sit corrected. Ices, I see; are they good ? " 

''Very bad; but we are pretending it's summer." 

" By the way, Laura and I are quite dying to know 
what you have in common with Mr. Marston." 

" A very great deal, Mrs. Ormerod." 

" Coats, and — waistcoats ? " 

"Dancing ? " 

"Keally, I ought to have had an ice, for without one I 
see no connection. You know Marston, then?" 

"He was a clerk in father's office. We did know him, 
mother?" 

"Certainly, my dear. Sir William will understand the 
degree of intimacy that indicates." 

"Mr. Marston is a friend of mine." 

"How extremely condescending of you to put it that 
way. Mr. Marston would be flattered if he heard you." 

"I fail to see why." 

"Look at your different positions in life. You are a man 
of title." 

"And Marston is a man of genius — a somewhat scarcer 
article." 

"Why, what has he done?" 

"Have you not read 'Waiting?' " 

"Of course. Some one sent me a copy. I never found 
out who. But that was by 'Godfrey Newcome.' " 

"Quite so — Marston's pseudonym. Then I know you 
have seen his play, for I was in your box at the Lyceum — 
on Tuesday, wasn't it?" 

"Did Mr. Marston write My Lady Disdainful?" 

"Indeed he did, Miss Ormerod. I am surprised you did 
not know it." 

Miss Ormerod appears lost in thought. Then she sees 
Marston rising to go; she turns quickly to Sir William. 

"Do me a favor. Tell Mr. Marston I wish to renew our 
old friendship." 

"Delighted." 

He walks after Marston. 

"Marston, an old friend wishes to speak to you — Miss 
Ormerod." 

"Does she?" A pause. "You remember what I told 



that girl iii the country who said the would give 

when I w;is f.ini. 

"I told Ii.t she would have to send for me then, as 1 
would never ash again You have just brought her sum 

deuce 1 ha\ e! 
"She lias only just learnt that 1 am er 1 success?" 
"Not a whisper of it till I told I 
"1 thought so. She cut me dead a quarter of an hour 

ago. It's too late now. old man Toll her what yon like. 

only don't hurl her unnecessarily." 
"All right, sonny. I understand." 
Rejoining the ladies — 

".Mr. Marston wishes me to say lie would have been de- 
lighted to have had your message a quarter of an hour 

earlier, but. as it is - , 

"Well. Sir William, as it is? " 

"As it is. Marston and I are returning to town together. 
Good afternoon, ladies." — The Sketch. 

Not TRUSTING, the Lawyer.— A Durham miner, aged 
73, visited a Newcastle lawyer (a bachelor) for the purpose 
of making his will. The old man's property consisted of 
two small cottages, which had cost him £150, and a little 
furniture. The lawyer having asked his client how he 
wished to dispose of his property, the latter replied: " Ma 
old woman hes to hev all se long as she's my widow. 
Efter that ma bairns gets all." "What age is your old 
woman?" asked the lawyer. "Seventy-two," replied the 
miner. "And how long have you and your wife been 
married? " asked the lawyer. "Over fifty years," replied 
the miner. Thereupon the lawyer suggested to his client 
that he should give the wife the interest during her life, 
whether she continued a widow or otherwise. "Hinney, 
aa winnot; aa'Il hev ma aan way," said the miner. "But 
surely," replied the lawyer, "you don't expect your old 
woman, 72 years old, would marry again?" The miner, 
looking the lawyer full in the face, answered with much 
solemnity: "Wey, hinney, thor's nae knaaing what young 
cheps like yourself will de for money." — Current 
Literature. 

This is the prime time for oysters, and no one is equal to 
Moraghan, of the California Market, when the freshest native or im- 
ported are concerned. 

For Irritation of thb Throat caused by Cold or use of the voice 
"Brown'* Bronchial Troche*" are exceedingly beneficial. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 
15, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on 

WEDNESDAY, the 15th DAY OF JANUARY, 1896, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Mon- 
day, January 13th. at 3o'clock p. M. E. L. PARKER. Seoretary. 

Office — Koom 15, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic steamship Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

TUESDAY, the 21 ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1896, 
at the hour of 11 o'clock a.m., for the election of a Board of Directors to serve 
for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as may 
come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, Jan. 10, 
1896, at 3 o'clock p. u. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 3-27 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Pajaro Valley Railroad Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pajaro Valley 
Railroad Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market 
street, San Francisco. Cal., on 

MONDAY, TUB 20TH DAY OF JANUARY, 1896, 
at the hour of it o'clock a. m.. tor the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meetiug. Transfer books will close on Thursday. 
January 9th, at 3 o'clock p M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office — 3'.'7 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

San Francisco Gas Light Company. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the San Francisco Gas Light 
Company will be held at the office of the company, at 12 o'clock m. on 
TUESDAY, January 21, 1896. WM. G. BARRETT, Secretary. 

San Francisco, .I:ioh;ot 7. I89rt. 

Tonicnn Hocino M l"\ Tel., East-33. Residence 1003 Sutter. 
lOllldUII UodllD, m. V. Office, City of Paris Building No. 14 
Grant avenue. Ex-surgeon U. S. Army; Ex-surgeon S. F. Receiving Hos- 
pital Hours, 11 A. M. to 2:30 P. M. ; 5 to 5:30 P, M. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January n, 1896. 




THE pace of November was almost too rapid for our 
small society to keep up, and there has been a grad- 
ual slackening down ever since the middle of last month. 
It was said that once the New Year holiday had passed, 
the season would be one mad whirl until its close, but so 
far the prediction has scarcely been realized. There were 
three first appearances at as many houses on Monday 
night for society to take choice from for its theatre parties, 
and they were all well patronized, while many of the sup- 
pers that followed were jolly affairs. There was a pleas- 
ant ''at home" at the rooms of the Sketch Club on Tues- 
day, the usual monthly reception day of the members. 

Last evening the Friday Fortnightly had their usual 
dance at Lunt's Hall; Miss Grace Sabin gave a very 
charming party at her home on California street, and the 
long anticipated, several times postponed, reception at 
the George Pope's became an accomplished fact; and just 
here it may be said that Mrs. Dan Murphy's friends are 
delighted to hear of her convalescence after her recent 
serious illness in New York. 

Among to-day's attractions will be Ed Townsend's read- 
ings from his popular novel of "Chimmie Fadden," in con- 
junction with a musical programme in the Auditorium of 
the Young Men's Christian Association building, under the 
auspices of the Mercantile Library Auxiliary. Mr. Andrew 
Bogart will give a song recital at Golden Gate Hall, and 
the first of Mrs. Jewett's "recitals" takes place at that 
lady's residence on Bush street. 

The cotillion of the Friday Night Club last week was led, 
as usual, by Mr. Greeuway, with Miss Romietta Wallace 
as his partner, and while no new figures were introduced, 
those danced were pretty and greatly admired by the on- 
lookers. The attendance was larger than anticipated, 
the ladies' gowns handsome, and the supper excellent. 
The interest regarding the next meeting of the club, which 
will be the Leap Year cotillion on Friday evening of next 
week, is very great. Miss Sallie Maynard will have the 
assistance of Miss Emily Hager, who is quite a veteran in 
like affairs; it will be a Iml poudre, and great things are 
expected at the hands of the young lady leaders. 

The crowning joy of the holiday week was the dinner 
dance at the Richelieu on Saturday evening. Mrs. Levy 
always requests her guests to invite one or more of their 
friends to dine with them during the New Year week, but 
on this occasion they were not limited to number, the re- 
sult being a delicious dinner, a lively dance, and a charm- 
ing little supper. Another pleasant affair of last Satur- 
day was the young ladies' luncheon at Mrs. D. N. Neus- 
tadter's on Van Ness avenue, which was followed by a 
matinee party at the Baldwin. 

Engagement entertainments have been largely in 
evidence for some time past, and among the couples so 
complimented by their friends were Miss Rose Walter and 
Abe Monteiff, Miss Gertrude Napthaly and Lionel Feigen- 
baum, Miss Belle Grant and Edward Pond, the culminating 
event to the latter couple being the very handsome dinner 
given last week by the mother of the groom-elect, Mrs. E. 
B. Pond. There were thirty guests at table, combiuing 
the married and the single, and the affair is spoken of as 
having been most enjoyable. 

Mrs. I. N. Walter's dinner to her niece was also a grand 
affair, at which twenty-five guests assembled around the 
elaborately spread board. Miss Rose Neustadter is an- 
other who has been largely entertained by her friends prior 
to her departure Eastwai-d and to Europe. 

Among recent dinners one of the most elaborate was 
given by Dr. and Mrs. R. A. McLean last week, to which 
sixteen were invited to meet the guests of honor. Governor 
and Mrs. Budd. Mrs. W. I. Kip was a hostess who pre- 
sided over a very large dinner party on Wednesday of this 
week. 



Miss Jennie Catherwood has been the pioneer in the 
Sunday tea line this winter, vocal music being quite a 
feature of her recent entertainment. Miss Daisy Van 
Ness's tea was also a pleasant one, and the same may be 
said of those over which Miss McNutt aud Miss Genevieve 
Goad presided. 

The event of the week in Jewish circles was the wedding 
of Miss Adele Dannenbaum and Daniel Fletcher; but the 
ceremony which is expected to eclipse all previous like 
gatherings will take place at the Concordia Club rooms on 
Tuesday evening of next week, when Miss Gertrude Nap- 
thaly and Lionel Feigenbaum will be the bride and groom. 
The Jarboe-Bull nuptials have been finally set to come off 
on the second of February, and the young couple are to 
spend several months in California ere going East to 
reside, which is pleasant news for Miss Kate's friends, 
among whom she is so great a favorite. 

An exceedingly pretty wedding was that of Miss Adele 
Dannenbaum and David Fletcher, which took place on 
Wednesday evening at the residence of the bride's parents, 
on Octavia and Bush streets. The house was elaborately 
decorated, the display of flowers being unusual for this 
season of the year, but the chief effect was produced in 
the large parlor, where white and green were the hues, 
and the bower wherein the young couple stood during the 
marriage ceremony was an exquisite creation of ferns and 
orange blossoms, tiny wedding bells depending from the 
front; the Reverend Dr. Voorsanger was the officiating 
clergyman, who made the happy couple "one flesh." The 
bride's costume was of heavy white satin, artistically 
draped on the corsage with point lace and bunches of 
orauge blossoms; the long flowing vail was also caught 
with a spray of the bridal blossoms, while the bouquet was 
of lilies of the valley. The maid of honor, Miss Hulda 
Dannenbaum, sister of the bride, was gowned in white 
chiffon and lace over white silk, the corsage square filled 
in with rare lace. Mrs. Daunenbaum's gown was of corded 
silk of a ruby hue, with long train covered with duchesse 
lace, aud she wore superb diamonds. Henry Schussler 
was the groom's best man. After the congratulations to 
the bride aud groom, the guests repaired to the dining- 
room, where an elegant supper was served by Ludwig 
amid Christmas holly berries and palms. The festivities 
were kept up until a late hour, with dancing, etc. Mr. 
and Mrs. Fletcher will, upon their return from their honey- 
moon trip, reside for a time at 1630 Octavia street, where 
they will receive their friends. 

Among the gatherings of next week will be the recep- 
tion at the Young Men's Christian Association Building, on 
Thursday evening. It will be under the auspices of St. 
Luke's Episcopal Church, and a very excellent musical 
programme has been arranged by Mr. Sabin, the organist 
of that church. 

Though it would be generally supposed that the winter, 
and especially such a frosty one as we have enjoyed of late, 
is hardly the time for a pleasant coaching party, the recent 
one given by Jas. D. Phelan proved delightful. The party 
of eight started from San Jose, their destination the Lick 
Observatory, and, that it was most enjoyable, it is only 
necessary to hear it dilated upon by any of the aforesaid 
eight to be quite convinced of the fact. 

The University Club has been the locale of several very 
pretty luncheon parties of late. Among those of note were 
the party arranged by Mrs. Willie Ashe to meet her sister- 
in-law, Mrs. Harold Sewell, nee Ashe, and the elaborate one 
given by the Misses Williams to a number of the season's 
buds. Several more will take place at the Club next week; 
oue of them will be the largest of the season so far. 

Society is delighted to welcome to its fold Mr. and Miss 
Warburton, who promise to be decided acquisitions. Mr. 
Warburton is the recently appointed British Consul- 
General at this port, and his daughter, Miss Warburton, 
is spoken of as a very charming young lady. 

The Entre Nous Cotillion Club will give a "Fancy Dress 
Leap Year German" on Friday evening. January 31st, at 
the Palace Hotel. It promises to be one of the most suc- 
cessful and brilliant assemblies of the winter season. 



January 1 1, 1896. 



SAX FRANCISCO NT \\s [.UTTER. 



al Courier October:' 

oarlv a three-column interview with 1 tio organ- 
• :rn F..i*t from ;i \\ 1 
tourmV. wherein Mr • igloo to remark tlm-'v 

about our • Marcus Henry "My 

manager. Mr Marcus M Henry, of San Francis 
ted after all this, and here I would like to 
word in behalf of his indi labors in inv behalf, 

which II.- was simply 

untiring in his energies, and always I and intel- 

- that 1 fell absolutely safe and prostx 

in his hands from the outset. IK rt.iinh worked for inv 

interests well, and I feel that [owe him a great deal." 

- Lillian O'Connell, daughter of Captain J. J. 

pell, U. S an accomplished reader and 

elocutionist. Miss OConneU will give this evening, a1 
Mrs. Jewett's house, an illustration of early Colonial life. 
with descriptive matter in poetry and prose. This bright 
young lady has made this subject a special study, ami her 
treatment of this interesting topic has been highly com 
mended in the East. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Jane F. Masten. 
daughter of N. K. Masten. to Edwin C. Ewell. now with 
the H. S. Crocker Company. The wedding will take place 
shortly after Lent. 

Chris Jorgenson gave a very delightful rnusieale at his 
studio. 325 Montgomery street, on Wednesday evening. 

STOPPING A GREAT SHIP. 

THE motion of a steamship on the Atlantic when the 
sea is calm is so smooth and steady that the passenger 
hardly realizes the tremeudous momentum of the vessel 
under his feet. A collision even after the engines have 
been slowed down gives a startling revelation of the energy 
of motion. The energy can also be accurately calculated 
with the aid of mathematical formulas, and the time and 
distance within which the motion can be totally arrested 
and the ship be brought to a stand may be ascertained in 
a similar manner. This calculation has recently been 
made for several well known ships. To stop the Etruria 
whose "displacement" is 9,680 tons, horse power 14,321 
and speed 20.18 knots an hour, 2 min. and 47 sec. are re- 
quired, and during the process of stopping the ship will 
■forge ahead 2,464 ft., which is only 176 ft. less than hali a 
mile. The United States cruiser Columbia with a dis- 
placement of 7,350 tons, 17,991 horse power and a speed 
of 22.8 knots, can be stopped in 2 min. and 15 sec, and 
within a space of 2,147 ft. The little flyer, Cushing, also 
of the United States navy, whose displacement is only 105 
tons, and horse power, 1,754, while its speed is 22.48 knots, 
can be stopped within a distance of 301 ft. in 18.4 sec. In 
each case the vessel is supposed to be going at full speed 
and the stoppage is produced by reversing the action of 
the propelling machinery. — Youth's Companion. 

SLItE AD Y the splendid Carnival at Truckee, in the heart 
of the great Sierra Nevada mountains, with its mam- 
moth ice palace, toboggan sliding, skating, sleigh riding, 
and all the lovely pastimes incident; to winter, has aroused 
the utmost excitement throughout the Coast. A big excur- 
sion has been organized every night this last week from 
Reno or the other neighboring towns, and now especial 
rates have been made by the railroad, enabling San Fran- 
ciscans to see the gigantic Palace, with its glistening and 
iridescent tints, at a minimum expense. This Saturday 
(to-night) a train will leave for Truckee, returning in time 
to bring its passengers home early next Monday morning. 
The palace itself is fairy-like in splendor, but it's the tobog- 
ganing that catches the visitors' hearts. 

The luxury and domestic comfort which Colonel Brennan is furn- 
ishing at the Pleasanton Hotel this winter has made him a sort of 
household saint. 

Hknuy Irving saw that Bignon's famous restaurant had not afforded 
him the luxuries of the MaisonRiche, corner Geary street and Grant ave- 
nue, during his sojourn in San Francisco. 

Cream of Orange Blossoms, creates spotless complexions. 60 cents, 
druggists or by mail. Pacihc Perfumery Company, San Francisco. 



Cooper & Co., artstationers and heraldic engravers, 746 Market St. S.F. 



FRENCH TERMS USED IN DRESS. 

T French words employed to designate certain parts 
of dress have become so common as to 
anglicised Many persons, however, are doubtful as to 
their exact meaning, and for their enlightenment a li 
lation of gome of them is appended below: 
",'"/'.'.' Applied to textiles, means a shaded effeel 

Mixed color effects, as if run together by damp- 
ness, tin- figures having no defined outlines. 

1 sed 10 designate the flowered silks in 

light colors, in vogue during the reign of Louis XV. 

61 1 lit Brocaded. Fa.iff< Corded silk. 
1/,,/, /.,.«,,' Raised figures, as if quilted. 
Taffeta — Silk with a plain glossy surface. 

silk with a well-defined cord. 

A'.y..- Corded silk or wool. Velours — Velvet. 
Satin mtrveillcuz- Twilled satin, Pvlerim Cape. 

Passementerie— Fancy dress trimmings of silk, or silk 

dined with beads or embroidery in metal. 
Panacht An upright ornament of plumes. 

I'.inn; — Used to designate a set of jewelry. 

Oilet — Waistcoat. Plissi- -Side-pleating. 

Revets — Lappels like those of a man's coat. 

Plastron — That portion of a waist which laps over and 
conceals the fastening. 

Ruche — A very full pleating of any material. 

Jape — Skirt. Rouleaux — Pipings of silk or velvet. 

Damassl — Damasked or figured material. Deutellt — Lace. 

Ecru — A yellowish white, the color of raw silk. 

Goqnille — Shell ruching. Fichu — Cape. 

Choux— Literally, cabbage; applied to large rosettes. 

OnduU — Fluted or wave like effects. Col — Collar. 

Berth — A fall of lace; silk, or any material which is 
frilled about the shoulders. 

Chapeau — Hat, bonnet. JaquetU — Jacket. 

Point d'esprit — Dotted lace. Saut-de-lit — A neglige gown. 

JUauteaii— Cloak. Figaro — A short fancy jacket. 

Pompom — A fluffy ball of silk, wool, or feathers. 

Balayeuse — Literally, sweeper; the silk or lace ruffle 
placed on the inside of skirt. 

Doublure — Lining. Ceinture — Belt. Chic — Stylish. 

Frou-frou — The rustling noise made by silk. 

Coiffure — The head-dress. Manchettes—Cutts. 

Toque — A close turban-like hat. Soutache — Braid/ 

Capote — A small bonnet. Gantx — Gloves. 

Mousquetaire cuffs — Deep flaring cuffs, like those of 
French musketeers. 

Chiffon — Literally, a rag; a soft gauzy material. 

Mousseline de sole — Silk muslin. Om.bre.lle— Parasol. 

Fin de Steele — Up to date. — The Chaperon. 

The highly accom- 
plished Queen of Italy 
culls it "the greatest 
musical invention of 
the century." 

And that Queen of Song, Mme. Melba, says: '• I could not understand 
how an instrument requiring no musical knowledge in the performer could 
be artistic from a musician's standpoint. I believe no one can undorstaod 
it unless they do as I did— see it and hear it played." 

Queen Victoria and vlrs. Grover Cleveland heard it— and nought it. 

You can come and hear it— we invite every lover of music and harmony. 

It costs do more than a piano — yet its possibilities are even greater. It 
is a Grand Parlor Orchestra, partly automatic, but with volume, speed, 
and expression under the control of the player. It is the one and only in- 
strument for those who have music in their souls, though not in their An- 
gers Come and hear it. no matter whether you can afford to buy it or not. 

KOHLER & CHASE, 

28 O'Farrell Street, S. F 

Descriptive Booklets Free 



the AEOLIAN 



A HOME ORCHESTRA. 



HAZELTON 
HEMME &. LONG 
BROWN & SIMPSON 



735 Market St. 



PIANOS 



Pianos to Rent and sold on Installmets. 




The modern oxygen cure for 
disease. 

Watson & Co. 



Pacific Coast Agents : 

\U MARKET ST 
Send Tor circulars 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January *i, i8c,6. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. \ From November 20, isar>. | Arrive 

6:30 a Haywards, Niles, and Way Sta- 
tions 10:1&A 

7:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45P 
7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Redding, via Davis 7:15 P 
7 :30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa. Cal- 

istoga, and Santa Rosa 6:15 P 

8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red 
Bluff, Sundays excepted Oroville 4:15 P 

*8:30a Peters and Milton *7:15p 

9:00 a San Leandro Hay wards and Way 

Stations 11 :45 a 

9:00a Los Angeles Express, Raymond, 
(for Yosemite), Santa Barbara, 

and Los Angeles 4 : 15 p 

9:00 a Martinez and Stockton 10:45 A 

10:00a San Leandro, Haywards, Niles... 1:45 P 
12:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 2 :45 p 

1 :00 P Niles , San Jose and Livermore ... 8 :45 A 

*1 :O0p Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

tl :30 P Port Costa and Way Stations .... t7 :45 P 
3 :00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5 :45 p 

4 :"'j0 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 6:45 P 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9:15a 

4:00p Benicia, Esparto, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 

Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45 a 

4:30p Niles, San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7:15 P 

5 :00 P Sao Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8 :45 P 

3 30p New Orleans Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld. Santa Barbara, Los 
Angeles, Deming. El Paso, New 

Orleans, and East 10:45 A 

3:30 p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 10 :45 a 

6:00p European mail, 0?den and East.. 9:45a 
6:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose. . . 7:45 a 

J7 :00 P Vallejo f7 :45 P 

7:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 10:45 a 

7 :00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:50p 

9 -.00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations ttl2 :00 A 

H10:05p '"Suuset Limited," Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans 

and East 213:45 p 

tfll:15P San Leandro, Haywards and 
Way Stations 7 : 15 A 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:15a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 

and way stations 5:50 p 

*3:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *11 :20 a 

4:15 P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9:50 a 

til :45 p Hunters' Excursion San Jose and 
Way Stations 1? :2 P 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:45a San Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only 1:45 P 

8:15 a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe and prin- 
cipal way stations 7 :05 p 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 5:00 P 

11:45 A Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

•2:30 P Sail Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10 :40 A 

•3:30 p San Jose and principal way sta- 
tions 9 :47 A 

*4 :30 p San Jose and Way Stations *8 :06 a 

5:30 p San Jose and way stations *8:48a 

6 :30 p San Jose and way stations 6 :35 A 

tll:45P San Jose and way stations f7:45p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 
(Slip 8). 

•7:15.9:00, and 11:00 a. m., 11:00, *8:00, J3:00, 
*4 :00, to :00 and *6 :00 p. m. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway. 

•6:00,8:00, 10:00 a. m.; 112:00, *1:00, 12:00, 
*3:00, t4:00 *5:00 P. M. 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

JSundays only. ^Tuesdays and Saturdays. 

ft Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

gSundays and Thursdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



WISE AND OTHERWISE. 

There is nothing so agonizing to the fine 
skin of vanity as the application of a rough 
truth.— Bulwer. 

No persons are more frequently wrong 
than those who will not admit they are 
wrong.— Rochefoucauld. 

As to people saying a few idle words about 
us, we must not mind that, any more than 
the old church steeple minds the rooks 
cawing about it.— George Eliot. 

The slanderer inflicts wrong by calumi- 
nating the absent; and he who gives credit 
to the calumny before he knows its truth is 
equally guilty.— Heradotus. 

The excesses of our youth are drafts upon 
our old age. payable with interest about 
thirty years after date.— Colton. 

A man is one whose body has been trained 
to be the ready servant of his mind; whose 
passions are trained to be the servants of 
his will; who enjoys the beautiful, loves 
truth, hates wrong, loves to do good, and 
respects others as himself.— Anon. 

Laughter is a most healthful exertion; it 
is one of the greatest helps to digestion 
with which I am acquainted; and the 
custom prevalent among our forefathers, of 
exciting it at table by jesters and buffoons, 
was founded on true medical principles.— 
Hufeland. 

To know that there are some souls, hearts 
and minds, here and there, who trust and 
whom we trust, some who know us and 
whom we know, some on whom we can al- 
ways rely, and who will always rely on us, 
makes a'paradise of this great world. This 
makes our life really life.— James Freeman 
Clarke. 



George Morrow & Go., 

(Established IBM.) 

tlftY AND GRftlN 
Commission Merchants. 

30 Clay St. and 28 Commercial St., S. P 
Branches at Bay District, Ingleside, and Third 
St Hay Wharf. Telephone No. 35 



ft. BUSWELL, 

Bookbinder, Paper-Ruler, Printer 
and Blank Book Manufacturer. 
516 Commercial St.. S. F. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through line to New York, via Panama, call- 
ing at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America Sailing at noon from company's 
wharf, First and Brannan streets. 
No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 
S. S. "City of Svdnev," January 2 I, 18%. 
S. S. "San Bias," January 28, 1895 
S S. "San Juan." February 8, 1896 
S. S. " Acapulco," February 18, 1896. 

Japan and China Line fob Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc 

SAILINGS at 3 P. M. 

S. S. "Peru," January 18, 1896. 
S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro." Feb 6. 1896. 
S. S. "City of Peking," via Honolulu, Febru- 
ary 25, 1896. 
S. S. "China," March 14, 1896. 

Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the Company's 
office, No. 435 Market street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR Japan and China. 
Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

Afridi (Cargo only).. Thursday. January 9, 1896 
Coptic (via Honolulu).. . Tuesday, Jan. 28, 1896 
Gaelic Saturday, February 15, 1896 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STUBBS. Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20, 11:00 A m; 12:35,3:30 
5:10, 6:30 P M. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11:30 p m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00 A M; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
6 :20 P M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 AM; 12:45, 
3 :40, 5 : 10 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :55 
and 6:35 pm. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AM; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:25 P M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 

same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 



I In Effect 
| Oct. 88, 1895, 



Desti'tion. 



7:40AM 8:00am 
3:30pm 9:30AM 
5:10pmI 5:00PM 



Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville, 

Cloverdale. 



Arrive tnS. f. 



Sundays, geek 



10:40 am 

6-05 PM 
7:30 PM 



8:50AM 
10:30 AM 
6:15pm 



| Pieta, Hop- I 
[land, Ukiah.l 



7:40a Ml 
3:30pm 



8:00 am Guerneville 7:30 pm 



7:40AM| 8:00AM 
5:10pmI 5:00PM 



Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 



10:40 a m 
6:05pm 



7;40AM| 8:00am 
3:30pm| 5:00pm 



Sebastopol. 



110:40am 
I 6:05pm 



10 30am 
6: 15pm 



8:50 am 
6:15pm 



10 30AM 
6:15pm 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Saratoga Springs, 
Upper Lake, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City. Fort Bragg, Usal. 
Westport, Laytonville, Willitts, Capella, Pomo, 
Potter Valley, John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly 
Valley, Harris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 



TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 



H. C. WHITING, 
Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a.m.; Jan. 15,30. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, Jan 5, 10, 
15, 20, 25, 30, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bav), Steamer "Pom- 
ona," at 2 p.m. Jan. 2.6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30 and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a. m. Jan. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Jan. 2, 6, 10, 14 18, 22, 26, 30, 
and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. m. 

For Ensenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz. Altata.and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley." 10 a. m., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-rlelds, 
(Freemantle) Australia, 
$220 first class, 8110 steer- 
age. Lowest rates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 

For HONOLULU, APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S ALAMEDA, 
Jan. 9th. 1896, at 2 p. M. 

For HONOLULU, S. S" 
"AUSTRALIA." 
Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 10 a m. 

REDUCED SPECIAL RATES for parties Feb. 
6th and 15th, 1886. 

For passage apply to 114 Montgomery street. 

For freight apply to 327 Market street. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 







AnnU'i 'i'.»n, S^.OO. 




«*H r "£*«Ue& 



i^Bta 



Ne^^^E'iItbr 



£&« 



(^alitot^^SSmsjcr. 




PoJ. Uf. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY IS, 1896. 



Number 3. 



I imd PmMUJud tmrrp Sal r.lay try tnr pnpritler. FRKD MARRIOTT, 
m x (l» t U llmhanl tlrftl. Son fr,inntco. Kmttrt.l at .*?» Francitoo 
P9M0JU* a* S<eond~<iatM JialUr. 

Tkt oft* of ltd SKWs LRTTKR i- .v. i iv.rt fiiy U at Tmmpi 

\Frtimk r\ \J htrt information may 

ot obtained rtgarding nbteription omd adrrrtitung rattn. 

FATHER Yorke can write. Also he can get mad. The 
A. P. A. has awakened a very lively passenger. 

IT is a fortunate thing for the peace of mankind that it 
is Engineer Jack Hammond who has been taken into 
custody by the Boers and not General Dick Hammond. 
Thank God. that warrior is still with us. and South Africa 
is a land many weeks distant. 



THE spectacle of the Rev. C. O. Brown in the pulpit of 
the First Congregational Church of San Francisco 
on Sunday last is one that will not soon be forgotten. And 
it is one from which that church will long suffer. Common 
decency is not to be affronted with impunity even by a 
body of Christian men and women. 

IF England could come to a dicker with President Kruger 
and exchange her new poet laureate for Dr. Jameson — 
the prisoner to be dealt with as the Boers see fit — the 
world would be gratified and Lord Salisbury relieved from 
an embarrassment that doubtless causes him to turn in his 
bed, and Tennyson, possibly, to turn in his grave. 

HEAVEN help the poor millionaires who own our daily 
newspapers if this theological controversy continues 
much longer. No man who is not at once a millionaire and 
a journalist can fully enter into the blood-sweating agony 
of one who has to steer between the Catholics on the right 
hand and the A. P. A. on the left. The sl'ghtest slip of 
the rudder may mean the loss of some nickels. 

RABBI Voorsanger has raised his eloquent voice in pro- 
test against the neglect of the home for the boarding 
house. It is a good topic for press and pulpit to enlarge 
upon. There is too strong a tendency in these times for 
married people to live in hotels and lodging houses, to the 
decay of domesticity. It is not from the boarding houses 
and the hotels, but from the homes of the nation, that the 
virtues of the coming generation are to arise. 

TWO classes of citizens are usually prepared for war — 
the editor of a daily paper and the ambitious soldier. 
The one wants news, the other fame. Not every editor, it 
is true, really thirsts for gore save in an indirect way. A 
genuine war scare ordinarily serves his purpose. But the 
average officer in the navy wants war. It is the oppor- 
tunity of his life. He has spent his life in part with the 
hope of distinguishing himself. Yet the rank and file who 
file much and rank little do not, upon reflection, want war; 
yet they must bear the brunt of battle. 

IT is now apparent that with reasonably good manage- 
ment the Venezuela dispute will be brought to a 
satisfactory settlement. The English people have no dis- 
position to go to war with the United States over the Mon- 
roe Doctrine, and the American people assuredly prefer 
peace to hostilities. When the whole truth as to the Ven- 
ezuelan frontier has been made known — when the exact 
rights of the republic and Great Britain have been ascer- 
tained — England will be content to accept the situation. 
The tone of her press and the utterances of her public men 
insure this. The American Jingoes are growing sad at the 
prospect, but as the possibility of war fades away sensible 
men feel relief. 



SUITS again?) preachers, for defamation of character, 
are becoming numerous. Ministers need such re- 
minders, occasionally, that they have taken out no license 

to slander. Nothing exceeds the sensitiveness of the 
average parson when his own reputation is touched, but 
the same man may be notorious for wanton assaults from 
the pulpit upon the good name of persons who may have 
the misfortune to fall under his displeasure. 

IT is just as well that Charles S. Young is not superin- 
tendent of the public schools of San Francisco. Mr. 
Young is a speculator, a politician, of moderate success, 
having been once or twice defeated, and a boomer. His 
faculties are such as fit him for the overthrow of Hawaii 
or the annexation of Lower California. He once sold Port 
Angeles wild-cat lots to Washington, D. C, inhabitants 
— property so wild that it makes its present owners feel 
very tame. If he did not go down with Estee last fall he 
certainly has now. Were his ability to realize half equal 
to his faculty to plan, he were now Governor of some sev- 
eral States. 

JD. L. McGAUGHEY, arrested for forgery, ought 
, to be penned up awhile for the good of himself, as he 
is no good. He is bad from beginning, which he ought 
never to have had, to end, of which there seems to be none 
to him. He stole money in Seattle, and, playing the baby 
act, wept himself out of the scrape, drowning his sorrow 
in the self-same tears. He killed Plouf with impunity be- 
cause Plouf had no friends and was generally known as a 
fakir, who swore him a lady-killer and a great dealer in 
family skeletons. But McGaughey will not be cleared by 
any eloquence this time. His record is so shadowy that 
doubtless he will yet find himself permanently in the shade. 

WHEN they inducted Mr. Bushnell into the chair of 
Governor of Ohio the other day, he started a new 
political plan. From a heart overflowing with gratitude 
to Napoleon McKiriley for his nomination and election, he 
closed his inaugural address with the hope that the people 
of the whole country would be able to enjoy the benediction 
of his services at the head of the Government. The Gov- 
ernor needn't get ill from anxiety lest the people will not 
be able to know to whom to pay the President's salary. 
Bill McKinley made quite trouble enough for the country 
with his McKinley Bill, and the people will think once or 
twice before accepting Governor Bushnell's nomination of 
a man whose work in Congress they overwhelmingly repu- 
diated as soon as they got a chance. If any new reason 
has, since then, arisen for making McKinley President, 
the news of it has not yet reached this Coast. 



THE master vice of the age has been discovered, drag- 
ged from its hiding place and exposed to a scandalized 
and trembling world. Brother Bovard, the Headless 
Horseman of Reform, is the discoverer, and the vice is 
playing for drink tickets in the social clubs of Alameda. 
When an Alamedan has put half a dozen drink tickets into 
his pocket to steal away his brains, and reels home thus 
loaded to his shrieking wife and waiiing children, the spec- 
tacle is said to be enough to move to shudders any be- 
holder. Yet there are compensations. The drink ticket 
makes business for Alameda. That is to say, since Brother 
Bovard raised his voice against this fearful sapper of vir- 
tue and domestic happiness, parties are made up in San 
Francisco to go over and hear him preach and have a look 
at him. And the San Franciscan increases the town's 
revenue by buying drinks at the saloons. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i8, 1896. 



SENSE AND SENTIMENT. 

THE Dutch Boers of South Africa are doubtless a wor- 
thy people, and it is natural enough that the world in 
general should view with a sorrowful indignation their 
hardships at the hands of the English. They are pitied 
very much as the world pities the Indians, who have per- 
ished under the feet of advancing American civilization. 
The Boer is not a savage, of course, but he is a hold-over 
from the past, an agricultural Silurian. That he should 
have forced upon him the choice of accepting the conditions 
of modern life or disappearing is hard, but it is inevitable. 
He has no more chance otherwise of surviving than the 
Spaniards and native Californiaus had out here when the 
discovery of gold brought a race of men who were their 
superiors in energy. Indeed, the parallel between the 
state of things in California in 1849 and that now existing in 
South Africa is very close. Cecil Rhodes may not be a 
man who approves himself to the minds of the righteous, 
but no one has denied him the possession of brains. He 
pictures the situation thus: "Within the Transvaal there 
are 70,000 new-comers and an old population of 14,000. 
With the development of the gold industry to a fuller ex- 
tent the new-comers will number 500,000 in five years, and 
eventually they will increase to 1,000,000, and probably 
more. From time to time the position will be upset by 
the attempts of the new population to claim common 
civil rights, which eventually they certainly must get." 
That is simply good sense. Substitute a northern State 
of Mexico for the Transvaal. Suppose that in Sonora the 
Americans owned more than half the soil and nine-tenths 
of the wealth — as is the case with the new-comers in the 
Transvaal — and how long would Sonora remain a Mexican 
State if the Americans were refused the ballot and com- 
pelled to pay five-sixths of the taxes? Does any American 
think that Sonora would not produce a Houston, as Texas 
did, and as South Africa has produced a Jameson? 

Americans are getting off altogether wrong about this 
African business. Of course it was reprehensible for Jame- 
son to raid the Boers, but then it was as natural as fate. 
And the truth has to be confessed that it is by the perpe- 
tration of such wrongs that civilization makes its progress. 
They tell for right, for better things, in the end, precisely 
as the grabbing of lands from the Indians on this continent 
has done. If the Boers are to be upheld, then the Trans- 
vaal will be a reservation of backwardness. Somebody 
has to give way when such a strain comes, and it will have 
to be the Boers. They cannot expect to stand out perma- 
nently against the forces which are beating up against 
their conservatism. The most that is asked of them is 
that they shall cease to be dogs in the manger, and ac- 
commodate themselves to the new life that has come to 
surround them, as it came to surround the equally pious, 
industrious, and slow-going Mormons of Utah. Americans 
above all others, Cecil Rhodes points out, are insistent 
upon civil rights for themselves. In the Transvaal, he 
adds, all the mine managers are Americans. 

The Boers are fine fighters, President Kruger is a heroic 
figure, and it is sad, unquestionably, that a bustling, eager, 
greedy, improving and elevating civilization should in its 
march have reached the calm and plodding and unambi- 
tious settlers. But that is simply their luck. They must 
either join the procession or go under. None would be 
readier to make them understand that than Americans, if 
the Boers happened to stand in the way of American en- 
terprise. 

John Bull Three weeks ago the average American was 
at conscious of a ferocious desire to dismember 

His Best, the British Empire and obliterate England 
from the map. To-day the average Ameri- 
can is conscious of a warmiug of the heart toward Albion 
and a desire to express sympathy and admiration for her. 
He is ready to fight over the Monroe Doctrine, and he does 
not approve of Dr. Jameson's raid, but it does his soul 
good to see how instant and hot was England's response 
to the insult and challenge of the German Emperor. 

When that insult was offered and all Europe yelled its 
exultant approval, Englishmen were for the moment still. 
Then they rose, and their Government showed how well 
it is prepared for war, and how ready to meet the coun- 
try's enemies on laud or sea, occasion demanding. The 



German bluff has been called, the young Emperor, the 
clanking of whose scabbard intoxicates him, humiliated 
and made ridiculous before mankind, and England holds 
her head up. defiant and triumphant. 

Americans better than any other people can understand 
just how Englishmen feel just now, for, after all, Ameri- 
cans are but modified Englishmen, notwithstanding the 
olla^podrida of races that inhabit the republic. It does 
not need that one should approve of the cause of her quar- 
rel in order to respect the resolution and pluck with which 
England turned on a hostile world. The nation's back was 
against the wall and her sword Hashed out. The English 
met the crisis as a brave man would, prepared to fight 
and fall in his tracks rather than parley. 

So it is because England has shown again how masculine 
her people are, how prompt to stand to their guns when 
danger threatens, that Americans feel now a new sense of 
kinship with them, and a pleasure in their victory over a 
situation which for some days looked very black. The 
Englishman has his faults that irritate the American, but 
he is a fighter. Brother Jonathan shakes hands with John 
Bull in congratulation. That little matter as to Venez- 
uela can wait. The present business is to acknowledge 
that the old manly British spirit is as fresh and healthy as 
ever it was. 

The City If the outside world judges San Francisco by 

Disgraced, her newspapers, the city is being sorely 
damaged at present. A theological contro- 
versy is raging in print of a sort that might reasonably be 
looked for, once in a way, in some backward Canadian 
town or Irish village. One not acquainted with the real 
state of the public mind here would think, on seeing not 
merely the columns but the whole pages which are given 
to the output of the inflamed disputants, that San Fran- 
cisco is divided into two hostile religious camps, ready to 
fall to with shillalahs at any moment. As a matter of 
fact, neither the intelligent few nor the bulk of the many 
care anything about the pious shindy. It does not even 
amuse the average San Franciscan, for the debaters are 
too long-winded to be listened to with any special atten- 
tion. . The actual combatants are a fiery priest and a few 
wooden-headed parsons. Each side has its partisans, of 
course, but altogether they number but an insignificant 
fraction of the population. Neither the ordinary Catholic 
nor the ordinary Protestant, nor the ordinary man who is 
without religious belief, is stirred. He has his living to 
make, and in his leisure something better to do than to 
wade through oceans of clerical bile. The fear, or rather 
the wish, expressed by the belligerents that rioting may 
presently ensue is grotesque. Half a dozen policemen 
could handle all the men in San Francisco who want to 
fight in testimony of the ardor of their love of God and 
hatred of one another. 

If the dull bigots of the A. P. A. and the incensed Father 
Yorke are to blame for the stupid and utterly discredit- 
able controversy, what shall we say of the newspapers 
which have furnished them a battle-field and made San 
Francisco ridiculous and contemptible iu the eyes of the 
country? The motive of these newspapers is to the last 
degree shameful. Under pretense of "giving the news," 
they published every insult that the A. P. A. orators at 
their meetings flung at the Catholics. They did this un- 
willingly, but feared to offend the A. P. A. by not 
doing it. Then when Father Yorke drew his pen and 
came back at his church's maligners, the editors were 
afraid to refuse him space lest the Catholics should 
be affronted. The A. P. A. is an organization of 
unknown size, and to disoblige it might mean a loss 
of subscribers; the Catholic church is a powerful body, 
and to disoblige it might be to forfeit nickels. So 
these catchpenny papers have been carried along by their 
cowardice and love of money until their pages reek with 
everything that excited sectarians can write in one an- 
other's dispraise, and the city is made to seem on the 
verge of a St. Patrick's Day insurrection. A notion of San 
Francisco's intellectual calibre is given to the stranger 
that must mortify every civilized person within its limits. 

Three things are made clear by this most un-Christian 
Christian exchange of stink-pots. One is that the A. P. A. 
of San Francisco, with its imported Canadian zealots like 
the Rev. Ross, has become a nuisance of magnitude which 



Jan 



FRANCISCO XI ITKR. 



■ 

'ining int.' 
,:i would consult the 

>f his chutvti by restraining to 
Tln> thirtl is that n 
prove tncmsel . 
_--vl fame as they are c on 
their management 

in Ih 1 
ted. we think, to deal justly in due time with all the 
this equally us and surprising outbreak 

of fanaticism, when election day comae any head marked 
A I' A or Catholic that shows itself and asks for votes 
00 account of its brand, will be hit. and hit hard. As for 
the newspapers which have truckled to the medieval sur 
iged in the godly battle, they have other sub- 
ers than the followers of Preacher Ross and Father 
Yorke. These should show their detestation of such vile 
journalism by taking only the newspapers which have held 
aloof from the fray. Were five per cent, of the modern 
men of common sense in this community to adopt thai 
course we should have an end of such controversies in the 
press, which is as craven as it is thrifty. Every citizen 
has an interest, and a vital one, in protecting the town's 
reputation. San Francisco is u sane and exceptionally 
liberal city, where a man's religious belief counts neither 
for nor against him. and it is not to be borne that a few 
preachers, priests, and newspapers should spread abroad 
the misconception that theological tights form one of our 
principal occupations. 

Police Perhaps the greatest humbugs in this city 
Detectives. — if there can be any greater than the 
ministers — are the police detectives. You 
are robbed. You rush off to the detectives and tell 
them about it. At the same time you tell them the 
names and addresses of the robbers, and where they 
generally deposit their swag. The gentlemanly detect- 
ives put on their kid gloves, light their cigars, take 
their canes, doff their silk hats and go to the persons named 
and the places designated, and if you were correct in the 
information you gave them, they recover the stuff. You 
are notified of the recovery, and after forgetting to de- 
mand the whole of your loss, you thank the detectives, 
thank God for the protection of an intelligent police de- 
tective force, and retire to your home. The newspapers 
the next day, by that mysterious clairvoyance by which 
they see and know everything, spread wide the knowledge 
of the skill, acuteness, penetration, sagacity, shrewdness, 
and so forth, and so forth, of the police, and make you half 
ashamed that you did not leave them all the plunder as a 
reward for such wonderful talents. But if you do not know 
the robbers aud the other appertinent details, you do not tell 
tbem to the detectives, they do not recover the goods, and 
the newspaper columns are as empty as the brain of the 
detectives. But we are perhaps not altogether just, — that 
is, not just to Truth. Sometimes, with all the clue in the 
world needful to do their work, with even a part of the 
plunder recovered from the place the robbers had hidden 
it, the certainty that the thieves would come back to get 
it, they blunder and make such a botch of it that they wear 
out Patience herself with their immeasurable stupidity, 
and with a dense ignorance and lack of common wit, let 
the thieves escape with the rest of their boodle. When 
the history of the great detectives of San Francisco is 
written hereafter, there will be no mention made of the In- 
gleside robbery and how the robbers were caught. And 
yet the great Lees will pose still as a successful detective, 
and will go to his grave clothed in the happy conceit that 
he has wit enough to go in when it rains, though no one 
else ever detected it in him. 

A Mirror Of The sensational character of the journal- 
The ism of the day is well illustrated by the 

Public Mind, manner in which our great dailies have 
dropped a number of the subjects that 
for a time tilled their pages with so-called news. But a 
few months ago Durrant was good for a page or two each 
day, and sometimes more. Then came the scandal over 
the arrest of a lecherous old man and his associates. That 
was made the basis of an attempt to agitate the public 
mind, and a call was printed to the "Mothers of San 



r thai 

mgregational Church 
lal bobbed up. and ll 
the public with tin \nil so ii goes. 

Such n and scandal mongering in our 

newspapers, that when one finds a subject of serious and 

inent interest taken up Industriously by tl i. be 

may be assured that ll i-. a dull time for what is called 

•new- Of course the city editors and the managing 
editors have to live Up to the conditions which the publish 

ing interest has imposed. The newspaper is no longer to 
be regarded as an advocate of principles, but is simply a 
money-making enterprise, doing more or teas good 
incidentally, but never hesitating from men Minns 

of public morality or propriety from inflicting an infinite 

amount Of mischief. The more sensational and the more 

scandalous the Intelligence that may reach the office of one 
of our dailies the more certain is' its publication, This 
sort of highly-seasoned gossip the appetite of the public 

calls for. and the publishers arc scarcely to be blamed for 
giving the people what the people seem to want. The 
newspaper criterion of taste and expediency is circulation. 
If any given piece of "news" helps to ''sell the paper," 
that is all the journalistic conductors wish to know. The 
more salacious the details, the greater the avidity mani- 
fested by the public to get at the ''news." The "editor- 
in-chief, " who was formerly the great man of journalism, 
is nowadays a myth. Few persons of intelligence care, a 
rap for the opinions expressed in the so-called editorial 
columns of the daily papers, well knowing that every ut- 
terance of those columns is controlled by the proprietary 
notion of what will best suit the public, or the particular 
class, political or otherwise, to whose prejudices or inter- 
ests it is the policy of the journal to eater. Such is our 
modern journalism, marvelous in its enterprise and al- 
most photographic in the fidelity and the celerity in which 
it holds the mirror up to nature. In it the public may 
see the reflection of their own faults and follies. This is, 
in truth, a scandal-loving age, and it must be said, in 
justice to the press, that deplorably vicious and mere- 
tricious as it is, it yet is at times a powerful agent for re- 
form; always a terrible police power more feared than the 
arm of the law; a zealous and influential friend of every 
worthy charity, and the most potent of all restraints upon 
rascality in office and every form of organized deceit and 
fraud. 



The Greenback The weak spot in our national finances 
and the is the possibility that at some distant 

Gold Reserve, day the free coinage of silver may be 
allowed by law, or that silver may be 
offered in payment of the United States bonds out-stand- 
ing. Were it not for this haunting fear of the financial 
world, there would be no utilization of greenbacks to draw 
gold from the Treasury, and no difficulty would exist re- 
garding the maintenance of a gold reserve. While this 
irrepressible silver spectre will not down at the bidding 
of any administration or school of finance, there yet re- 
mains another source of alarm in the reissue of greenbacks. 
It is high time for the Government of the United States to 
go out of the banking business, which has brought upon 
the country a multitude of disasters. It was supposed by 
the founders of the Government that the constitution pro- 
hibited, by implication, all issues of paper money. But 
the civil war made a resort to paper a military necessity, 
and what a great national emergency created a sense of 
expediency has since suffered to exist. Unquestionably, 
President Cleveland has given good advice regarding the 
greenback: the days of its usefulness have long passed, 
and it should be permanently retired. National banks, 
which are in reality strictly private enterprises, doing 
business under restraints and safeguards imposed by 
Congress, may be depended upon to supply all the paper 
money needed for the convenience of trade and commerce. 
And with such amendments in the bankingj laws as have 
from time«to time been suggested, the circulation of the 
national bank notes would be sufficiently elastic to con- 
form itself to the varying wants of business, in accordance 
with the changes of the seasons, the movement of crops, 
and the tendency towards prosperity in trade or other- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 



wise. In short, national bank notes may be made to con- 
stitute a safe and adequate paper currency, while leaving 
ample room for the enlarged circulation of coin, either 
gold or silver, as the inclinations or convenience of the 
public might dictate. Certainly the business men of the 
nation are thoroughly disgusted with the present condi- 
tion of the national finances, and the continued resort to 
issues of bonds to replenish the reserve of gold. It is 
practically like pouring water into a sieve. Aud while 
the administration seems to be forced into a continuance 
of this artifice, which is admitted to be nothing more than a 
temporary relief, the manner in which the sale of bonds 
has been managed has naturally excited much adverse 
criticism. Congress ought to settle the entire difficulty 
by some wholesome and radical legislation, but with silver 
men in control of the Senate any permanent relief seems 
well-nigh hopeless at this time. The best that can be 
done just now is to call attention to the vicious and un- 
patriotic course of the free-silver Senators, who have 
taken advantage of a time of popular unrest and national 
exigency to attempt to force their preposterous propos- 
itions upon an unwilling people. The free coinage agita- 
tion has subsided everywhere but in the silver States and 
Territories and the Senate of the United States, where 
the champions of the depreciated metal are strongly in- 
trenched. 

A Common Excuse Charles L. Hill, who murdered his 
for wife in Oakland the other day, de- 

Wife Murder. clares that he was moved to do the 

deed by ''family troubles," and that 
]ust before he shot her she had told him something that 
"no man would listen to quietly." But he refuses to go 
into particulars, sayiug that he " will not drag her name 
down." If Hill thinks that he can win public sympathy by 
thus insinuating a cause that he declines to openly charge, 
he is greatly mistaken. An open accusation of infidelity 
against his wife would be far more manly, as well as more 
credible, than this devious sort of impeachment. But 
whether he had provocation or not, his slaying of his wife 
was in any case a brutal and inexcusable murder. Public 
opinion should frown upon such crimes of violence, no mat- 
ter on what pretext they may be committed. Infidelity 
is no excuse for murder, although at times the circum- 
stances may be of such a character as to mitigate the of- 
fense. Sensible people must be aware that the toleration 
of wife-murder on the ground of adultery is to afford to the 
perpetrators of that crime of violence a ready excuse for 
the act. A jealous fool of a husband may first slay and 
theu invent a story of his wife's shame and confession. The 
death of the best witness against him makes such false- 
hood easy, and little liable to detection, and with this foun- 
dation to build upon susceptible juries are easily "worked" 
by artful attorneys. It must be conceded, on sober ex- 
amination, that the too-common extenuation of wife-mur- 
der on the plea of infidelity, is not in accordance with 
sound reasoning or a healthful sentiment. No doubt some 
men are spurred to the commission of a crime, which other- 
wise they would recoil from with horror, by the idea that 
the public expect and approve of vengeance in some form 
in cases where the domestic "happiness" has been de- 
stroyed. There is, it appears, some remnant of this bar- 
barous sentiment in communities otherwise regarded as 
advanced and civilized. The evil and the folly of this no- 
tion is best exhibited by the manner in which it is made the 
excuse or justification of such atrocious acts as that of 
which Charles L. Hill is guilty. Iu this country the laws 
afford a plain and sufficiently speedy remedy to any hus- 
band who finds his confidence betrayed. And when once 
the door is opened to any other than the lawful remedy, the 
innocent are quite as apt to suffer as the guilty. 

The Button-Pressers Perhaps at no time in the history 

Of of the world have the fortunes of 

The Present Day. nations been more subject to the 

arbitrary will of individuals than at 

the present day. In the days of Alexander or of the 

Caesars the arbitrament of war or peace was scarcely 

more a subject of individual caprice or personal ambition 

than it is now in the time of the Emperor William of 

Germany, of Prime Minister Salisbury of England and 



President Cleveland of the United States. We saw, not 
long ago, how the President of this republic, circumscribed 
as it is with all the forms of a written constitution, by the 
mere stroke of his pen almost precipitated the two great- 
est nations of Christendom into a war whose far-reaching 
consequences no man could foresee. And but the other 
day the irritable and ambitious Emperor of Germany im- 
pulsively flashed to a remote African dependency of Great 
Britain a message that roused all Europe as though it 
were a trumpet call to arms. A score of men could be 
named, any one of whom has it at all times in his power to 
destroy the peace of Europe, or plunge the entire 
civilized world into the horrors of war. We have been 
wont to boast in this country of the restraints provided by 
our constitution — and the wisdom of its framers, in reserv- 
ing to Congress the sole power to declare war, has often 
been commended. But in a twinkling that delusion has 
been banished. It is now perceived that with a strong 
popular sentiment at his back, the President of the 
United States has only to say the word for war, and 
Congress becomes the echo of his decree; the mere instru- 
ment of his will. Not more absolute, in reality, is the 
power of the Czar of Russia to let loose the dogs of war 
than is that of the President of the United States. The ■ 
chief difference is that the President must feel assured 
that the people are with him, while the Czar is at least 
nominally free from restraint. Yet, as a matter of fact, 
it is highly improbable that the Czar would ever venture 
upon a war in violation of any strong sentiment of the 
Russian people. After all that may be said, it can 
scarcely seem strange that nations which are constantly 
drilling and preparing for war will some day be at one 
another's throats. Some ambitious or headstrong 
individual seizes a propitious moment to press the button 
of national pride or hatred, and instantly the flame of war 
bursts forth. 

True Meaning Blackmail is a word popularly used as a 
of term of reproach. It was formerly a 

Blackmail. purely Highland extortion — a tribute 
levied by freebooters for the protection of 
property. It was, in olden times, a tax paid to robbers 
for security. In modern times, it is a bribe tendered by 
sinners to garrulous people whose mouths can be bound 
only with bits of gold, to secure a good name to which the 
owner is not entitled. It is rarely or never paid by people 
who have nothing to fear. When the extortion is believed 
to be too great, the victim squeals and cries out "black- 
mail," and pretends to be virtuous, and puts on airs of 
innocence, and hopes to cow the scoundrel who has been 
making the levy. This generally succeeds in frightening 
the other party into silence and self-banishment. Some- 
times it does not. We all know a case in which it did not. 
That was because the blackmailer was just the same kind 
of a hypocrite as the blackmailee. She had a short-lived 
reputation, but no character, to lose. She went for spoil, 
and didn't intend to be bluffed. She was playing a big 
game. If she does not win, she knows the other fellow will 
lose, and that for her will be a victory. She will be five 
hundred dollars ahead, and they will both go to hell to- 
gether, both quoting scripture, both uttering prayers, 
both sanctimoniously and piously showing the whites of 
their eyes. If, after this exhibition of what goes on in the 
lives of ministers and Sunday school teachers, the religion 
of Christ isn't cheapened and degraded and the worship of 
the devil held less censurable, we'll never prophecy any 
more. 

The leaders of the Cuban rebels have shown good 
generalship so far, in their plans of campaign against 
the Spanish forces. It must have, been a great tempta- 
tion to the revolutionists, at times, to engage in regular 
battle with the troops of Spain. But, beyond question, 
the wiser policy is to harass and annoy the regulars, 
rather than to meet them squarely in the open field, where 
the latter would have every advantage. General Gomez 
and his fellow-leaders are exhibiting a sagacity that 
promises ultimate success, if their present plans be main- 
tained. The yellow fever, as they truly say, is a worse 
enemy to the soldiers of Spain than the bullets or machetes 
of the insurrectionists. 






Janu;i- 



SAN FRANCISCO NI'WS LETTER 



T 



BRIGHT WOMEN OF THE SWIM. 

BERE 'iit in our >ivial life in San Frai 

of our 
•- of some 

and 
will pi 



l 

few 

■ no) allud 
nan. the now woman, or the 
minds and cull 
unan who is equally a society woman, 
ent of the Century Club, 
■ of this kind, of commanding presi 
• beauty with dignity of manner, a pro- 
inker ami : ersationalist, -lie 

- alike ;is hostess in her beautiful home or in presid- 
er the councils of the Century Club. 
ther beautiful woman equally gifted is Mrs. Henry 
ins, wife of one of our leading physicians. Mrs. Gib- 
- a bright feature of the Century Club (of which she 
en President). She is ever foremost in all thai per- 
tains to the advancement and education of her sex, and 
Sorts in behalf of the Mercantile Library ire note* 
worthy. Yet withal she is most womanly and refined, 
nothing of the "strong-minded female" being apparent in 
her sparkling conversation. 

Miss Mary Lake, principal of the girls' school bearing 
her name, is a clever woman of much originality of thought, 
her mode of expressing the same being reminiscent of her 
father, the late Judge Delos Lake. She comes of a bright 
family, her sister Annie Lake having essayed the /<</< of 
novelist before she married the author of "Chimmie Fad- 
den.'' E. W. Townsend. 

Mrs. Buckingham. n& Eldridge, a member of the Cen-. 
tury Club, is of a more severe cast than any of the above 
mentioned women. She is more of the Boston style. Mrs. 
Buckingham is much given to charitable and church work 
also. 

Mrs. Horace Davis, wife of the well known merchant, is 
a recognized light in the Century Club, a woman far above 
the average in quickness of perception, literary knowledge 
and inheriting from her father — the late Starr King — the 
same happy faculty of expression in conveying, that knowl- 
edge to others. 

Mrs. Horace Wilson is well known as a bright woman, 
of much executive ability, whose advice is always eagerly 
sought and followed by her associates in club or society 
work for the advancement of women. 

Miss Laura McKinstry is a young woman of exceptional 
mental powers, her bright mind and sarcastic wit having 
gained her the reputation of being the brightest young 
lady in society. Miss Laura has a keen sense of the ridic- 
ulous, and at a glance seems to perceive the shams of the 
day. Tall and slender, with brown hair and eyes, she is an 
attractive as well as clever feature of our social world. 

Miss West, of the West Seminary for young ladies, is a 
woman of strong character and much culture. 

One of society's handsomest girls is Miss Kate Jarboe, 
who is also one of the cleverest. Our community will soon 
lose this bright young woman, however, as marriage with 
an Eastern journalist will rob us of her charming presence. 
Miss Jarboe has turned her attention to literary work dur- 
ing the last two years, and bids fair to achieve success 
therein. 

Mrs. Prank Pixley is another lady who combines social 
distinction with great executive ability in club life and 
church or charitable work. 

Mrs. Dr. Burgess is a lady of bright intellectual powers 
and conversational charm, possessing a mind enriched by 
extended foreign travel and contact with the prominent 
people of other countries, as well as her own. She is also 
an earnest worker in church and charitable undertakings. 
Mrs. David Bixler in a large degree unites the society 
hostess with the bright intellectual attainments entitling 
her to the name of a clever woman. She is much inter- 
ested in art, and always ready to patronize either music or 
painting, her home on Pine street being a temple of both. 
Miss Anna Head, the fiancee of Lieutenant Jephson, of 
South African fame, is a young lady whose mental gifts 
have been still further enhanced by culture and foreign 



tod remarkably 
I tbe day, making < ■ 
charming at the 

meml 

The brilliant achievement and artistic life of 

Mis M II D, ,. fagot rank among our 

bright women. Her abnorma 

mind being quick and retentive: her personal charm 
great it may be termed magnetic. Mrs. De Young is a 

supporter Of art in .1 I its branches, while no worthy chari 
table work appeals to her in vain. 

I If course, this is but .1 lithe of the bright women of our 

city, but as examples ol brilliant social and literary culture 
combined they certainlj ta positions. 



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Glasses scientiBcally adjusted and detective sight 
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McKenzie's Catarrh Cure. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 



AT THE GROSS. 



" W'OU will go with me to-morrow? " 
I " Yes, to the end of the world! " 
She regarded him with dark eyes full of sombre fire. 



she asked, in tones 

not loved you all my 

to live with a brute 

spoken mortal words 



" Why should I not go with you? 
full of plaintive misery. "Have I 
life long? Why should I continue 
simply because a mortal man has 
above our joined hands? " 

He clasped her to his breast and covered her face with 
ourning kisses. 

"My love, my life, my own!" he murmured, with 
tremulous incoherence; and then kneeling down at her 
feet, he buried his rapturous face in the folds of her redo- 
lent garments. 

Her robes, the room, the luxurious chair that contained 
the marvelous beauty of her form were all of a daffodil 
hue and it seemed to him that he was floating heavenward 
in the golden glory of dawn. 

It was she who broke the mellow silence. 
"I shall take the child," she said, in a tone denoting 
former discussion. 

" It is his child, too," he answered bitterly. 
" Yes, but he is not her mother." 
" But will it be well for her to — " he checked himself. 
She covered her face with her hands and sobbed aloud. 
"Even at this hour," she moaned, "you can think how 
it will be for her in the future." 

He tried to comfort her with assurances and caresses, 
but she tore herself from his arms, and, rising to her full, 
proud height, she stepped to the door of her boudoir and 
parting the soft draperies, entered therein. 

An ormolu clock ticked softly in the semi-darkness and 
the room had a fragrance as palpitant as a gentle shower 
of violets. 

She approached the little bed that contained this flower 
life. She drew aside the muslin curtains and looked upon 
her child who lay with upturned face and white arms 
outstretched. 

She stood, white, transfixed, with eyes sad and stead- 
fast as Fate's. 

He had followed her and when her gaze rested upon him 
he grew cold and still as one in the presence of death. 

She broke the stillness in a voice as clear and solemn as 
vesper bells. 

" See! " she said, pointing to the sleeping child; "her 
form has made the shape of the cross in her sleep, but it 
shall be my crucifixion, not hers. I will not go with you 
to-morrow." 

He kissed her cold hands and departed like one stricken 
dumb. 

She knelt down by the window and looked out at the 
stars. 

To her eyes, the heavens were filled with a great radi- 
ance, and in its midst she saw Christ on Calvary, not 
thorn crowned and spent with anguish, but radiant, sub- 
lime, as he cried in a voice of holy triumph, " Suffer little 
children to come unto me." — Maude Andrews in The 
Bohemian. 

ONE of the saddest telegrams for her host of friends was 
the message conveying the news of the death of Mrs. 
Theresa Josephine Corlette, in Milan, Italy, December 
17th last, from congestion of the brain. Mrs. Corlette ar- 
rived in this city from New Zealand in 1875, and shortly 
after was engaged as special correspondent for the Chron- 
icle. Her work on the Post also won her success, but she 
was best known for her fashion department in the News 
Letter under the signature of "Silver Pen." In 18!)0 the 
lady took her daughter Ethel to Paris for a first-class 
musical education, and later on to Italy, where she passed 
away. She leaves five children to mourn her loss. Miss 
Ethel Corlette has had the body cremated in Milan, and 
will return with the sacred ashes. 



For many years, during which time it has been tested by the 
trade, the J. F. Cutter brand of Kentucky Bourbon is pronounced 
one of the purest and best brands of whiskey that has ever been pro- 
duced. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street are the Pacific Coast 
agents for this whiskey, and also for the celebrated Argonaut brand 
of Kentucky Bourbon, which has become popular with the trade. 



" WALTER BAKER HO.," ' 

Established Dorchester, Mass., 1780. 

Breakfast Cocoa; | 




It hears their 

Trarlo Mark 

"La Belle 
< Ihocolatiere" 
on every can. 



Absolutely 

Pure. 
No Chemicals. 



BEWARE OF 
IMITATIONS. 

Always ask for Walter Baker & Co.'s 

Brealrfast Ooooei, 

Made at 
DORCHESTER, MASS. 



WINTER CRUISES 



TO THE MEDITERRANEAN AND THE ORIENT. 

The Hamburg-American Line's 

TWIN-SCREW EXPRESS S. S. FUERST BISMARCK, 

will leave New York January M, 1896, for Madeira, Gibraltar, Algiers, Ge- 
noa, Nice, Tunis, Alexandria (for Cairo and the Pyramids), Jaffa (for 
Jerusalem), Smyrna, Constantinople, Athens, Malta, Messina, Palermo, 
Naples, Genoa, New York, duration about ten weeks. Also, 

WINTER CRUISE TO THE WEST INDIES 
and the Spanish Main. The Hamburg-American Line's TWIN-SCREW 
EXPRESS S. S. COLUMBIA will leave New York January 35, 1896, for 
Port au Prince (Hayti). Mayaguez (Porto Rico), St Thomas, St. Kitts, 
Antigua, Guadaloupe. Martinique, St. Lucia, Barbados, Trinidad, La Gua- 
yara (for Caracas. Venezuela), and Puerto Cabello, Kingston (Jamaica), 
Havana, New York, duration about four and a half weeks. This is the 
first time a Transatlantic liner (about four times as large as an ordinary 
W. I. Liner) with all its comforts is offered on this route. 

NEW ROUTE TO LONDON AND PARIS. 
Twin-Screw Express Steamer Service— NEW YORK to PLYMOUTH 
(London). CHERBOURG (Paris) and HAMBURG. For further particulars 
apply to HAMBURG AMERICAN LINE, 37 Broadway. Now York. 
A. W. MYER, 401 California St., cor. Sansome, San Francisco. 



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offered reliable parties. Address all orders and communications to the 
sole manufacturers, 

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3y8 Seventh St., San Francisco, Cal. 



January 18. 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 







'. I few 

Ed- 

1 >;i 1- 






I think il - ' 

There U 

woman called Coanie Ediss wh ■ d.H-- ample justice to 
Harry I>.i ■ and who sings B song peculiarly ap- 

pealing just now Some' ana who were with me 

looked startled when the song began, and although 1 am 
still in the dark as to the cause of their mirth, their un- 

y mirth. 1 must admit 1 found the son;.' most amusing. 
Hut 1 ething back of it. and I frankly stale 1 

would like to know what it is. Tin- song goes: 

" Left on the doorstep at half pa-l innts 
' l h. Moses . it was fold. 
Left in a basket tied with twine; 
Oh. Jerusalem! it was chilly." 

But the "Oh. Moses, is was cold" is a refrain one can- 
not help echoing, for we are in the middle of a b.izzard, 
and the present weather has broken the January record 
for twenty-five years. It is in fact so freezing that the 
paper I write on is like ice under my hand, and I am shiv- 
ering although not two feet away from an open fire. I am 
quite convinced that it is freezing-, not roasting, which is 
the fate of condemned sinners. I have wondered why any 
one who can escape lingers in Xew York, but people do 
stay nevertheless. 

Dr. Younger and Aleck Daly have been at the Hoffman 
for a short time. Mrs. Younger sailed for Europe last 
Saturday. Miss Elizabeth Strong is oneof the Californians 
who is making a distinct name for herself in artistic circles 
here. She has a charming studio in the Rembrandt, where 
her Saturday afternoon teas are events in the world of 
artists. The "Rembrandt" is next door to the Carnegie 
studio building, where Theodore Wores has his studio, and 
is the artistic home of Childe Hassam, Frederic Remington, 
Sargent, Rossiter, and a score of well-known artists. 

I am amused at the New York position of a certain well- 
known San Francisco family. Their Californian supremacy 
is absolutely ignored, and they are known simply as " the 
people who were over in Japan," "the St. Louis Hicks," 
or "the people who had a stunning daughter at Mrs. 
Reed's." I must say it is discouraging to a Californian to 
find Californian leadership so indifferent to Eastern minds. 
But if they recognized any Californian leader they should 
surely recognize Mrs. Hager, who is the most generous 
and kindly hostess, and who, whatever may be said to the 
contrary, I personally have never known as anything 
but sincere, loyal, and entirely above 
worldly considerations in the choice 
of friends. 

Mr. de Gierville, the talented war 
correspondent of the Herald, is in 
New York, and is making himself 
popular with stories of his experiences 
in the country of the little people. 
Some of them are familiar, but are 
made original by his clever method. 

The Journal is becoming a paper to 
be remarked, but any one interested 
in California will pray that Mr. Hearst 
may take a higher standard. He, as 
an individual, has proven so dignified, 
so capable, so balanced, that one can- 
not but recognize his great ability. 
It is a pity if he means to establish 
here, as he did in San Francisco, a 
merely money-making sheet. He is 
too clever. Bennett is a fine model 
and understands the medium between 
sensationalism and respectability. 
Mrs. Hearst, who is rarely referred 
to in the papers, unless her beauty 
and her diamonds share the notice, has 
just given five thousand dollars to the 
Children's Hospital in "Washington as 
part of a bequest of her late husband, 



o f 



Mrs H< . 

ol only beautifu 

m'ii.. 

(Ira. Ogden M • ed from abroad, ami is. 

as usual, entertaining lavishly. 
I wrote you of the unliappiness in the Ratcll 

The two met before tie Judge for tin' trial of their ili 

wept, went out and lunched together, and "made 
up." rhe astonishment of the Judge was only equaled by 
hi- delight at seeing "married folks agree," which i- rare 
in hi- . ourt. 

\ I,,,/.-. ././,,. n. 1996. Passe Pahtovt, 

THE BEST COMPANY. 

he substantial institution- of the United States 
is the ancient and honorable insurance company, the 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of Xew York. Richard A. 
McCurdy, President, No insurance corporation has a bel 
ter character for honor and justice than the Mutual Life. 
While by its wise and conservative business management 
its investments have yielded an immense profit to the 
policy-holders, it has made it. a constant policy to be the first 
company to settle a risk, frequently even when there was a 
question in dispute. Mr. A. B. Forbes, the agent for the 
Pacific coast, lias done all in his power to maintain the 
company's good name and fame in California and upon the 
Pacific Coast, and the Mutual Life Insurance Company 
now occupies the same leading position on this continent 
it has so long occupied throughout the other parts of 
the United States. The company has its own splendid 
building and offices at 222 Sansome street, corner of Cali- 
fornia street, where all information will be given to those 
requiring safe and solid life insurance protection. 

THE greatest auction sale of centrally located real es- 
tate in San Francisco that has occurred for a long time 
will take place next Thursday, Jan. 25th, when Baldwin & 
Hammond, the well-known real estate firm, will dispose at 
public sale of the splendid property of the Pacific Im- 
provement Company, involving Residence and business lots, 
with the excessively low terms of one-fourth cash and the 
balance in one, two and three years, with interest at seven 
per cent, per annum on deferred payments. The property 
includes seventy splendid lots at the gore of Valencia and 
Market, beside others in Jessie and Stevenson, Valencia 
and Castro streets. Out by the park 5 lovely villa lots at 
Stanyan and Waller streets will be disposed of. 

He — I think there are microbes in kisses. She — Have 
you tried one of mine? — Truth. 



cant see it all 

Cod-liver oil is something more than a fat. Its peculiar 
action depends on a number of substances, among which 
might be mentioned iodine and phosphorus. There can be 
no substitute for cod-liver oil, because there is no other oil 
known which has in natural combination with it such a 
large number of valuable medicinal agents. 

ScotH 5trvulsicru 

of Cod-liver Oil, with the hypophosphites contains the whole 
oil, with its natural properties, and in a thoroughly emulsified 
or digested condition. The hypophosphites increase the 
appetite and impart strength to the nervous system. This 
combination has marked curative properties in a number of 
diseases of the skin and scalp, to which scrofulous persons 
are peculiarly liable. Such diseases as chronic eczema, ring- 
worm, and other skin affections, are often quickly cured by 
the constitutional effects following the use ot Scott's Emulsion. 

S o cts. and Si a bottle. SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists, New York. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January IS, 1896. 




COULD it have been a resolve to do her 
mite for the American drama that 
prompted Marie Waiuwright's choice of 
Hi, Daughters of Eve? If so, what a pity 
that some work fairly representative of 
5? American play-writing brains could not 
have had the benefit of her patriotism. That it is a safer 
and more interesting investment by far to witness Miss 
Wainwright in the plays of an author securely dead and 
famous— both of which boons are, strange to chronicle, 
withheld from the Lancaster-Magnus combination — was 
evidenced Monday evening at the Baldwin, when Sheridan 
Knowles' rare old comedy, The Love < 'hase, was given a 
delightful presentation. The atmosphere of symmetry 
and grace, the spirit of a bygone politeness and pictur- 
esque deportment hovers about every word and action of 
this quaint comedy treasure. The happy termination of 
the amusing complications, where the wand of some good 
fairy seems to lend its aid to the good, old-fashioned finale, 
is as refreshing as a breath of country air in the spring- 
time. Mr. Magnus, he of The Daughters of Eve, has written 
an epilogue which Miss Wainwright addresses in a win- 
ningly confidential way to the audience and players. It is 
a pretty idea and neatly done, but not half so effective as 
the bonne bo in In' that closed our childhood's tales: "And 
they lived happily ever afterwards." 

Marie Wainwright makes a sparkling Constance. The 
silvery quality of her cheery voice and the charm of a 
vivacious, mettlesome presence give a ring of sincerity to 
her comedy parts that is not always iu the same true 
sympathy with severer roles. Her Constance is an 
adorable and womanly woman; imperious, tender; blithe- 
some, reflective; wistfully affectionate and ardently 
jealous — a felicitous combination of all the sweet con- 
tradictions component of woman's lovableness. She gowns 
Constance in a series of wondrous creations which tender 
young things call "dreams" " poems " and " symphonies "; 
gowns beautiful and startling, if baser man may meekly 
sing their excellence. The entire performance is full of 
color and gentle merriment. Barton Hill's easy elegance 
of manner makes an ideal Pondlove. There is a rhythmic 
breadth of gesture inseparable from Mr. Hill that makes 
him invaluable for these parts in which the old school of 
acting stands unexcelled. Wildrake was a great improve- 
ment on Mr. Hartwig's acting of last week; there being 
some excuse for strutting and posing. Miss Kussell's 
Widow Green was out of drawing; it was more the Katisha 
of modern comic opera than the simpering widow of The 

Love Chase. 

* * * 

Mr. James's Macbeth is an absorbingly melodramatic one. 
It could not be otherwise and live up to the accepted 
traditions of what is a true rendering of the gory Thane. 
Sir Henry recently presented his [imaginative, tensely- 
strung, gold-armored fiend to New York, but the noble 
army of Shakespearian students and the gentlemen of the 
press would have none of his sinister, villain-born creation. 
They clamored for the big, bloody, brutish Macbeth of 
tradition — the wife-ridden Macbeth who might have died 
a worthy man but for the devilish ingenuity of his crimson 
haired spouse; but who, once the spark of ambition had 
flared into murderous flames, was the great butchering, 
shuddering monster that stands the gory peer of tragedy 
and the apex of melodrama. Mr. James's Macbeth seeks no 
esoteric meaning in the lines that precede his crimes: he 
enters the stage a man of fairly wholesome parts; he dies 
fierce but distracted, and glad to leave behind the intoler- 
able burden of bleak, soul-shivering remorse. Nature has 
fashioned Louis James well for the part both iu voice and 
person. He rants because a Macbeth .must rant to be 
within the borders of probability; but he rants discreetly 
— delicately, I should say, could such a dainty word be 
applied to a proceedure so violent. Miss Kruger's Lady 
Macbeth was bravely played and reflects favorably on the 



versatility of such a young actress. Of course, it had not 
the force and savage intensity vital to a thorough concep- 
tion of this great tragic role, but it made an excellent foil 
for the star and displayed a generous promise for the 
maturer Miss Kruger that a few years time will give us. 
Macduff was over-done at every point by Mr. Lindsley. 
His final scene was ruined by an over-acted violence that 
approached hysteria. 



The only performance of Othello during Mr. James's en- 
gagement at the California was given Tuesday night to a 
fine audience. Mr. James makes a splendid Moor; 
physique, intellectual appreciation and deep, sonorous 
voice have achieved a distinction for his Othello greater 
than that of any living American actor. With the scenic 
environment such as the brains and capital of an Irving 
could supply and an adequate supporting company, Mr. 
James could reap a fortune from performances of Othello 
and Hamlet alone. He is not au actor great enough to 
compel universal recognition in the modest surroundings 
of his present equipment, but with his unmistakable tragic 
powers augmented by the support of first-cla^s fellow 
players and the wonderous adjuncts possible to the stage 
of to-day, he would sooner find the place that is his right 
in the dramatic annals of the end of the nineteenth 
century. Louis James is an agreeable and highly in- 
telligent exponent of several of Shakespeare's great 
characters. His initial season as an unattached star dis- 
plays none of the showman's art in stage effects nor in the 
handling of the ensemble; his company, with the exception 
of Miss Kruger, is not a good one; but despite these draw- 
backs Mr. James has played San Francisco two weeks of 
the legitimate and increased a hundred fold the good favor 

in which he is held here. 

# # # 

The Senator, with the possible exception of Sydney 
Grundy's Arabian Nights, displa3's the Frawley players to 
the best advantage of any play in their repertory. It is 
an intensely interesting comedy, and, breathing as it does, 
the spirit of restless activity and indomitable energy of the 
American people and mirroring with such fidelity the 
eventfulness of diplomatic and political life in Washington, 
it is full of interest and meaning for American audiences — 
whose opportunities are rare for witnessing good plays 
written by their countrymen. It is not many months 
since The Senator was reviewed in these columns, and little 
that is new can be said for the excellence of the play and 
its production. Miss Lansing Rowan's Mrs. Armstrong 
introduced another agreeable actress into Mr. Frawley's 
ranks. Miss Kennark played Mabel Denman, and though 
not giving her the matchless dignity and gentle woman- 
hood that made Katherine Grey's Mabel so sweetly 
gracious in the earlier production, she acts the part in a 
clean, intelligent manner. Frawley is peerless in his char- 
acter of the wooden lieutenant; Blakemore's Ling Ching 
is the same droll, gentlemanly Celestial. Blanche Bates 
never did a prettier piece of acting than Mrs. Hillary, and 
Maclyn Arbuckle's Senator Rivers has become a part of 
local theatrical history. 

* * # 

Sedley Brown's pastoral drama, A Long Lane, while not 
so full of heroism and adventure as most of the plays staged 
at the Grand, has excellently displayed the aptitude of 
Mr. Morosco's players for work requiring quiet depth. 
Next week, for the first time in San Francisco, James 
Haskin's sensational melodrama, The Mn n Without a Country, 
will be produced. A further event will be the first appear- 
ance on this stage of Woody Van JJyck, the child star. 



Gilmore and Leland, a jovial team of Irish comedians, 
and William Roberts, another clever specialty artist, are 
among the new faces at the Orpheum this week. Most of 
the old favorites of last week have been retained, so the 
programme is one of much interest for lovers of the variety, 
and has drawn a big business throughout the week. 
* * * 

The dashing John Philip Sousa and his great band will 
give several concerts next month at the Mechanics' Pavil- 
ion under the direction of Friedlander, Gottlob & Co. 



January is, 1896. 



SAN IK \N\ 









qu 

■ 
I his voii 1 
been definitely placed ami cultured t" an almosi liquid 
purit th splendid vehement • 

no little idea of it> drama! ihere, 

undoubtedly, is in a d more romantic vein. A 

novelty, a duet from Humperdinck's // ' and Grrttl, 

Mrs. Berte-Mark and Mi>* Berglund. It 

• it show ai -y for B CO 

injr. but is brightly fr and amusing. 

* • • 

A concert for the benefit of the choir fund of < 
Church will be given at the Y. M. 0. A. Auditorium on 
Wednesday evening. Besides the choir, the Plymouth 
Quartette. Miss Mabel Love, and Mrs. Maud Chappelle- 
Henley will participate. A realization of the excellent 
work done here in the past by this choir, and the fact that 
the concert is to aid its maintenance as a permanent 
organization, should attract a large audience. 

* * * 

The Frawley Company will present Th. Ensign at the 
Columbia commencing with Tuesday evening next. The 
play is a strong, patriotic melodrama, full of exciting situa- 
tions, and as the American flag plays a prominent part in 
its story, will doubtless have an enthusiastic reception, 
coming now at a time when the public pulse is running 
high over rumors of war. It was excellently produced last 
season by these favorite players. 

* * * 

The Alcazar will next week see a presentation of Leon- 
ard Grover's sensational melodrama, The Wolves of New 
York. It will be realistically staged in every particular ; 
the scenes of the oil works, the burning tank, and the 
hoisting machinery, making most impressive adjuncts. The 
cast is nearly the same as that at Stock-well's last year, 
where the piece enjoyed a run of four weeks. 

* * * 

In Old Kentucky, one of the successes of this decade, and 
the play which introduced the famous Pickaninny Band, 
the race of five thoroughbreds on the Lexington track, 
and many other novelties, comes next week to the Califor- 
nia. It is distinctly an American play, and pictures Ken- 
tucky life with the true blue grass flavor. Miss Laura 
Burt, the original Madge, comes with the company. 

* * * 

Otto Bendix will give a piano recital at Beethoven Hall 
on Wednesday evening. Mr. Bendix added materially to a 
slack season of music by his former recitals, displaying re- 
markable powers as an interpreter of the greatest of 
piano literature, and his initial recital of this season will 
doubtless be largely attended. 

# # # 

Next week will be the fifth and last of Ixion at the 
Tivoli. A new batch of songs and specialties will garnish 
the production. The, Gentle Savage, a new American 
opera, said to be of excellent plot and melody, will follow. 

* * * 

Marie Wainwright closes her engagement at the Bald- 
win Sunday night. The theatre will remain closed for two 
weeks, when the Tavary Opera Company commences a 
season of grand opera. 

The people of San Francisco may not realize that the Olympic 
Salt Water Company expended $100,000 to secure pare ocean water 
to supply the Lurline Baths. After being pumped into this great 
bathing establishment it is heated and furnished so that either a 
tub bath or a swim may be enjoyed in the heart of the city. Tickets 
for the plunge bath may be had in blocks of 50 tickets, at the rate of 
5 for $1. Single tickets for either tub or plunge will remain un- 
changed, viz. : Single tickets, 30 cents, or four for $1. 



The ideal flowers of California bloom all the year round for the 
most part ; but Leopold & Co., on Post street, near the corner of 
Kearny, observe the seasons in their beautiful nursery, and the re- 
sult is that our most beautiful violets and roses adorn the debutante 
"rosebuds " who dance in our winter cotillions. 



California Theatre 



AI SATHAM - 






* OLD KENTUCKY. 



. 



-» . 1 hi 



Columbia Theatre- 



■ 

11 ml M 

QlDg iiifhi.liiik' 
kWLEY COMPANY Id 
o« a" freat naval dnnu 

THE ENSIGN. 

1 3 Frigate 
■ nrol Havana i 
light )• an In the White Ho 5i 

.1 Januarj 8fth— MEN and WOMEN 



Morosco's Grand Opera house. 

Wall iee and Propi 

Lasl performances ol ' a Long Lane " 

MONDAY EVENING, January -Join- .1. as' sensation- 

al Bl "■ . 

THE MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY. 

Matinees Saturdays and Suud;iys 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. 



Ernestine Kremng. 
Proprietor and Manager 
Every eveuinfr. Third edition of the beautirul spectacle, 

IXION; or THE MAN OF THE WHEEL 

New songs; ne«' dances; new specialties; new localisms 
Iu preparation: THE GENTLE SAVAGE, a new American 
opera. 
Popular Prices SSo and BOe 

Y. M. G. A. Auditorium. 

Wednesday evening. January 22d. at 8 o'clock. 

GRAND CONCERT. 

Grace Church Choir, assisted by Miss Mabel Love. Soprano, 
Mrs. Maud Chappelie-Henley, Contralto, Plymouth Quartette. 
Wm. H. Holt, Conductor. Proceeds for the Choir Fund. 



G rOVer's Alcazar. The Palais Royal ol America. 

To-night. January 18th, and every evening next week, Leonard 
Grover's melo-drama, 

THE WOLUES OF NEW YORK, 

Saturday matinee: Dolls for everybody. 
Matinees Saturday and Sundav. 
Night Prices— 10c , 15c ,25c, 35c, 50c. 
Matinee Prices— 10c, 15c, and S5o. 

0„. R l A11M San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall, O'Farrell 
rp neU m . street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 

To-night and during the week. Remarkably new attractions. 
A uniformly 

SUPERB BILL. 

Gilmore & Leonard, Mons. Wm. Roberts, Manhattan Comedy 

Four, and our all-star company. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony. 10c; Opera chairs and bos 

seats. 50c 



FODESTfl & BALDOGGfll, 



FLORISTS and DECORATORS. 



BAY VIEW NURSERY, 242 Sutter St , 

Between Kearny and Grant Avenue, San Francisco. Cal. 

Telephone Main 780. 



Dave Samson, 

PROGRESS 
RESTAURANT. 



Fine Mercantile Lunch. 
Imported Pilsener, Franciscaner, 
and Extra Pale Lager on draught. 

327 and 329 Bush St. 



I II I I AM RPHHARH Tne En gUsh actress, coaches ladies and gentle 
L1LLIHIM DLUUnnu. mentor the dramatic profession; appearances ar- 



ranged. Shakespearean classes Wednesday evenings. 
EAN ACADEMY. 913 Hyde street. San Francisco. Cal 



SHAKESPEAR- 



Tonicnn Woano IU H Tel., Eaat-33. Residence lOOSSutte 
lullldUll UodllO, /H. U, Office, City of Paris Building No. 



Grant avenue, 
p iial Hours., 



Residence 1003 Sutter. 
14 
Ex-surgeon U. S. Army; Ex-surgeon S. F. Receiving Hos- 
11 A. M. to 2:30 'P. M.; 5 to 5:30 P.M. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 




dj?0tfg*t <@Sr' 



THE Reverend Mr. Brown, whose name is most irrev- 
erently tossed about in the mouths of the ungodly, 
jeered at by wicked men, and flippantly familiar to the 
lips of dissolute women, has graduated from the tribunal of 
the examining police magistrate with the degree of N. G. 
Before he was quite through that interesting ordeal, he 
omitted, for one occasion only, his usual Sunday task of 
calling the people of his religious congregation together, 
and telling them to be good — to do as he said, not as he did. 
Then he skipped back to his pulpit again, as if nothing had 
happened. But the deacons are also a lot of self-satisfied 
folk, who are sometimes nearly as good as the minister, 
and who have to be reckoned with. One or two of them 
therefore, as we understand, suggested to him that he had 
forgotten something. The pious Mrs. Cooper, who never 
lets the world forget her religiousness, spoke right out 
about him in terms of sisterly reproach — aye, even worse 
than that, perchance. Then the deacons quickened his 
memory. He had forgotten that, in the course of a little 
private controversy he had lately had with a female grad- 
uate from one of the penitentiaries of the East, there had 
been some considerable public scandal, and he had gotten 
his Sunday shirt bosom a good deal smutched, and it needed 
to go through the laundry. So now he has been before the 
Bay Association of Congregational ministers, and told them 
he didn't think the spots on his bosom amounted to much, 
but would submit to examination. Now, then, comes the 
Ecclesiastical Court, and the investigation, and the calling 
of witnesses, and the laundry business is to be gone over 
again. Will these religious people wash their dirty linen in 
public, or will they do it in whispers ? Whatever happens 
• to the Reverend Mr. Brown, he can't come out of it with 
any worse name than he has now. If the whitewash brush 
is liberally used, he may come back with his name as white 
as snow, whereas it is now as dark as his original christen- 
ing made it. 

# * * 

Sir Northrope Cowles, recently decorated by the Sultan, 
has been much aggrieved by the strictures upon his royal 
master, anent the Armenian massacre. Sir Northrope de- 
clares that, had the news of those atrocities been wired in 
time to the Bohemian Club, his chief and worthy colleague, 
Sir George Hall, the Turkish Consul, would not so long 
have delayed his departure to Constantinople to see about 
it, and have the killiDg peremptorily checked. Abdul 
Hamid has written confidently to Mr. Cowles, as follows: 

My Dear Northrope: Our mutual friend Hall has arrived, and is in- 
stalled in one of our spare palaces overlooking the Bosphorus, where 
he has hot and cold water every morning, with all the modern con- 
veniences. I will send you by the next mail a photograph of George 
in turban and burnous. I can tell you he looks stunning. The odal- 
isques are quite taken with Sir George, and that littlechanson of his, 
" Fapa Sachina," has been translated into Arabic for the benefit of 
the ladies of my harem. George, I am glad to inform you, is very 
discreet, and, indeed, it will be to his advantage to continue so, for if 
he tried to be too affectionate to any of my Circassians, I would bow- 
string him without a moment's hesitation. I am sorry Joe Redding 
got no further than New York. Give my regards to Sir Michael de 
Young, Sir Henry Heyman, Sir William H. Barnes, and any other 
knights and noblemen you may remember. Tell the Bohemian boys 
tbat those stories about my people slaughtering those vile Arme- 
nians are all a flam. By the way, Hall is studying the Koran 
diligently. Drop a hint to Doc Stebbins that I'd like to have him 
and Rabbi Voorsanger over here for an hour — I wouldn't do nothing 
to them 1 oh no. They'd make a hole in the Bosphorus -in short 
order, you hear me! Allah, Bish Mallah. Aiidi'l Hamid. 

This remarkable document Sir Northrope will have 
framed, and it will be placed among the archives of the 

Bohemian Club. 

# # * 

A cloud, no bigger than a man's hand, has grown up 
within the portals of the big house on California street, 
where Pacific Coast art has her permanent residence. 
The sculptors, who sculp in clay, are at daggers drawn 



with the painters. The Michael Angeloes in embryo de- 
clare that they do not want to be confined to the basement, 
but long for the sun and air of the upper apartments. The 
painters and the Directors protest that they will not en- 
dure the trail of mud the sculptors leave behind them on 
the stairways, and that they must sculp in the basement, 
or not at all. Again, some of the conservative Directors 
believe that there is not the necessary discipline among the 
classes. Pupils should be taught to understand that they 
are not admitted to the society of the antiques to cut up 
and while away the hours in monkey shines. With those 
grievances lifting their heads like thistles in a fertile field, 
there is little doubt but there will be a thorough scouring 
out in the Art Association pretty shortly, and a new and 
more exacting regime established. 



Joe King, the Supervisor, to Parson Bovard says: 
'* Ye shepherds seem unconscious of the errors of your ways; 
" Ye rail at social gatherings, and horribly perplex 
" YouDg men and modest maidens with cautions about sex, 
" Yet all this time the newspapers are tilled with shocking cases, 
" Where parsons make the sisters good by kisses and embraces; 
" Before ye preach that dance and call are dangerous to souls, 
" And apt to furnish fancy roasts for Satan's sulphurous coals, 
" With morality's big besom sweep out the muddy church, 
" And see your own white robe is clean, ere others you besmirch. 
In this sound piece of counsel to resolutions wed, 
It looks if Mr. King had hit the nail square on the head. 



There was an amusing episode in one of the Market 
street cafes the other night — quite a prominent one, too. 
Two peripatetic colored gentlemen — "black as the ace of 
spades " — with banjo and guitar, wandered into the estab- 
lishment, and asked if they might play a "ehewn" "jes' 
for a glass of dat yar beer. " The good-natured German 
proprietor was so much amused that he gave his consent, 
whereupon the pair sat down aud played: " Do you love 
me, Liza Jane ? " in seventeen different discords. 

Just then Ashton Stevens, the well-known musical com- 
poser, happened along with a friend — on their way home. 

"Stop," said Mr. Stevens; "we'll have some fun." 

Entering the place, they instructed the proprietor to 
send over two schooners to the "coons." Result — great 
joy — and a banjo string snapped in the middle of "Buffalo 
Gals Come Out To-night," which stopped the show. 

" Here's a string," said Stevens, who is never unpro- 
vided. So drawing out his little pocket case, he proceeded 
to restring the old darky's battered instrument. 

Then, with his inimitable art, he played "Swanee River" 
for them. 

They were wild with ecstasy and delight. So was the 
big crowd of visitors at the place. Mr. Stevens continued 
on for twenty minutes, till the audience was getting em- 
barrassingly large. Then he calmly arose, and took up a 
collection in the banjo for the " two coons." It amounted 
to $4.50. 

They haven't been seen since. 



The Clerk of the Weather, who dwells in the sky, 

Of late has found pastime amusing, 
In making the weather clerk on earth a guy, 

And all his predictions confusing; 
Until weary at last, he called out from his throne: 

"Say, Hammon, I'll give you a pouring, 
' I've had lots oi fun, now I'll let you alone," 
So Hammon's flags once more are soaring. 



The members of the Bohemian Club held their quarterly 
meeting on Tuesday, and elected a nominating committee 
to make up the regular ticket for the next election in 
April. Mr. Horace Piatt has no aspirations for a third 
term, and, therefore, will not figure in the fight. Mr. 
Vanderlyn Stow and Dr. George Chismore are the two 
most prominent candidates before the club for the Pres- 
idency. Dr. Chismore is one of the most popular men in 
the club, and has found time from the demands of his pi'O- 
fession to cultivate the Muses to a considerable extent. 
He writes good verse, and is so modest withal, that it is 
only upon special occasions he flings the saddle over 
Pegasus, and rides that noble steed bravely for the 
edification of Bohemia. 



January 18, 1896. 



FRANCISCO M\V> I.I l 



Saturday night '.u-t thi 

(or the 

it tins 
• >s ami ai i 

\s 




a boy just out of school be enlistee! in the Union army at 
the first call for troops in 1861. and served in the Third, 
Fourteenth, and Eighteenth New York cavalry regiments, 
successively. His gallantry on the field won him quick 
promotion, and he was in active service for five years. At 
various times he served under Generals Canby, Banks, 
Hurlbut, and Merritt. In 1866 he was mustered out of 
the army with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. Although 
strongly recommended by officers high in rank for a trans- 
fer to the regular army, he decided not to make the appli- 
cation, and having an excellent training as a civil and topo- 
graphical engineer, he accepted the position of engineer in 
the construction department of the Union Pacific Railway. 
When the road was completed, in 1868, Colonel Stone came 
to California, and was a contractor for some five years for 
the Southern Pacific Railway. He is now engaged in the 
construction of the San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara 
Railway. His mining interests in Nevada County and in 
Yuba are extremely extensive, involving huge interests in 
the May, Shamrock, Merrimac, Kentuck, Norambagua, 
besides others. As a public man, Colonel Stone is a staunch 
Republican, and has worked hard for his party. A mem- 
ber of the Union League Club since the first year of its 
re-organization, be has spared no effort in effecting its 
prosperity. It may be also of interest to know that he is 
Treasurer of the People's Home Savings Bank, now in 
liquidation. He was chosen to represent the bank by the 

stockholders. 

# # # 

The expected arrival of Duke Degli Abruzzi, the King 
of Italy's first cousin, next week will be a sort of event in 
bicycle circles. He is an enthusiastic bicyclist, and carries 
his wheel with him on his tour around the world. It was 
his stepmother, Princess Letitia, who was sent by King 
Humbert to close confinement for riding through the prin- 
cipal streets in' Florence clad in rather tight bloomers. 
He visits San Francisco on the big Italian cruiser, Christo- 
foro Columbo. Query — Is he after one of our wealthy 
native daughters? He is very rich himself, however, so 
far as Italian fortunes are concerned, that he will have to 
come high. 



P :\ Itnriiv a wealthy ■ 

th.' rami ih.v.-i kin, 1 Mr 
u.i- worktns in one evei log, when 

young men dashed I One Bung a sack in :i 

.mil tin' other plunged a similar packagi 
barrel .>r water. Both then fled through the rear entri 
and Immediately four policemen, all breathless and re 

"We are after a couple of fellows that have just ro 
■& Co. '8 bank,' shouted an officer. "Did they 1 
in here?" 

"That they did. replied Paddy promptly, "ami thru 
wint out that way. pointing in a direction opposite to 

that taken by the robbers. The police Bashed after them, 
and the sagacious blacksmith picked up the sacks, which 
held some twenty thousand dollars, lie never heard of 
the thieves again, kepi Ms own counsel, and judiciously in 

vested this strangely acquired capital. And I' 
Burns' luck became a byword in after days, when the rich 

old blacksmith got into the habil of relating the incident 
with unction. 

* * * 

"Billy," said Victoria, taking off her slipper, 
"Come and lie across my knee" (Vic is quite a whipper); 
"Grandma," cried that naughty boy, "I'm a Hohenzollern, 
You'd not see a swell like me snivelling and hollering!" 
But Her Majesty, despite cousins, nieces, aunties. 
Has made up her mind to spank Billy's little panties. 

* * * 

Harry Gillig and Frank Unger are again on the Pacific 
Coast, and will pass a few of the winter months in this 
frostless clime. Their arrival here will be the cause of 
much rejoicing in Bohemia. 

* * * 

Once Julius Haste desired to taste 

The sweets of office without measure. 

Then Deacon squealed, his fate was sealed, 
And Haste may now repent at leisure. 

After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gam. You 
will find it admirable. 

No visitor ever fails to visit the wonderful Japanese goods and 
cloisonnS ware at Geo. T. Marsh & Co.'s, under the Palace Hotel. 




Removal Notice. 



TIREY L, FORD, Att'y-at-LaW, 

Has removed his offices to Rooms 156-157, 8th floor CROOKEK BUILDING. 



George B. Merrill 



J Montgomery St., S. F. 



Has removed his 
Law offices to 

California Safe Deposit Building, 
Rooms 316 and 317, Third Floor, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 





\VR society is probably 
not aware of bow se- 
verely it has suffered by the recent Brown scandal, but 
one of the most interesting entertainments ever offered 
for its delectation has been nipped in the bud, so to speak, 
by the killing frost of fear. It is said a well-known old 
bachelor of our most conservative circles was to have 
given a baby show at his esthetic home for the benefit of 
a fashionable church choir, and everything was progress- 
ing most favorably towards a successful issue when the 
notoriety of the aforesaid suit created a panic in the old 
beau's mind. Visions of babies being literally as well as 
figuratively "left at his door," claims of ownership, etc., 
being involved, all loomed before him to such an alarming 
extent the result has been the abandonment of the unique 
baby show, and society must fain be content with the 
more prosaic and commonplace concert at a public hall 
instead. 



Although anxious parents of a worldly turn of mind may 
not altogether like their girls' admiration for wearers of 
bright buttons, yet it has its palliation in the fact that 
the officers have driven the Brownies to the wall. These 
youngsters, who in the earlier part of the season swarmed 
around tea tables and suffered the petting of the women, 
now find themselves relegated to amuse the very young 
girls who are in the budding stage. This is eminently as 
it should be. The sight of a veteran belle of many sea- 
sons and a smooth-faced boy in a flirtation game engaged 
being a nauseous one to most people. 

* * * 

Our young men have a cause of complaint against Frank 
Newlands, in that he has chosen Washington City as the 
locale for the debut of his daughters, the co-heiresses of 
their grandfather Sharon's estate. But evidently the 
astute champion of silver is aware of the lack of "distinc- 
tion " to be had in exchange for wealth in the city of their 
birth, and that factor in the world's esteem holds high 
place with the Congressman from Nevada. 

* * * 

It is a noteworthy fact that the entire group of lovely 
buds of the season are unanimous in expressions of delight 
over the possible union of a wealthy young man and a beau- 
tiful young girl — noteworthy in that not a lisp of malice has 
been uttered, not a whisper of envy or jealousy been heard. 
Surely the young couple must be more than ordinarily 
popular to provoke so amiable a condition of things. 

* * * 

Of all the untiring members of our society none can sur- 
pass Mrs. Henry Scott, who seems ever on the alert to 
provide pleasure for her friends as well as for herself. Not 
only does she gather them around her hospitable board in 
town, but the spacious B'lingham cottage has become re- 
nowned for its large and jolly "house parties" weekly 
given by this popular matron. 

* * * 

There has been much pouting among the buds that the 
Philadelphia should have been ordered away, and so soon 
before their Leap Year cotillion, too, the presence of the 
navy chaps at the Presidio hop last week proving such a 
delightful addition to the button beaux of the Post. But no 
words can express the gratification of the wearers of 
black coats thereat. 

* * * 

The pupils in the rival fashionable schools in our midst 
are much excited over a football contest which is to take 
place between the teams of the Lake and West Seminaries. 
Even the holidays have not abated the furore of daily prac- 
tice, say the girls, each side being confident of victory. 

* * # 

The trainanie tones of voice and velvety glances of Miss 
Elma Graves seem to be doing a fair amount of execution 
among the male portion of the recently organized "riding 
class." 



The girls say Phil Tompkins is pressing Ad. Mizner hard 
in daring speech and action, calling him "a regular case." 
His brother Min has more of the milk of human kindness, 
they declare; but that is not astonishing, they add, when 
one remembers his occupation. 
* * * 

" Who would have dreamed that Jennie would marry a 
Shoemaker ! " was heard at a bud dinner last week. 



MEMORY.— CHAS. FENNO HOFFIHAH. 

Hope, cheated too often when life's in its spring, 
From the bosom that nursed it forever takes wing, 
And memory comes, as its promises fade, 
To brood o'er the havoc that passion has made, 

Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tatti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 

Just think! only two months ago the young Kaiser William was 
drinking old Saratoga whiskey at the Kiel Canal opening with the 
Prince of Wales and an American Admiral, and now all three 
countries are at loggerheads! 



The Latest Fall and Winter Goods 
have arrived. 



H. S. BRIDGE & CO. 



MERCHANT TAILORS. Many novel- 
ties in Imported Wear. Shirts to order 

a Specialty 

622 Market St., (rjp stairs, opposite Palace Hotel San Francisco 



UP-TO-DATE 

At Moderate Prices. 



Tailoring 



J. H. HAWES, 

Mezzanine B , Crocker Building. (Up one-half flight fronting on Post St.) 



Brandt & Go. 



FINE TAILORING 
139 Montgomery St. 



ERNST H. LUDWIG X CO.. 

The Model 

American 

Caterers. 

1206 Sutter St., S. F. Telephone 2388. 



Gran Bros., 



316 Montgomery Street. S F. 

No. 205 New High St.. Los Angeles. 



Concrete Artificial 
Stone Work. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 
W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



January i 



s.\N FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



'3 



THE WOMAN IN BUSINESS. 

A of people m ; at an auc- 

-aleofJap.. ■ it)y. 

•v much am I bli bite 

•-.itl the a iioir it 
abov. 

ded an elderly 
lady, sitting in one of the front >eats. 

"T ; une.'' cried the man with 

the hammer. "This vase. ..- a work of 

art. is worth four times that sum. Why. 

look at it. Will an intelligent audience 

such u sacrifice? " 

came in the same wo- 
man's vo; 

Well, well, well! Can't you see that 
- a treasure, and you stand here and 
allow it to be given away for such a paltry 
sum? " 

"Ei<;ht dollars." Again it was the 
same bidder speaking. 

"Eight dollars! The very idea!'' ejacu- 
lated the auctioneer. "I never saw the 
iike. Come, what is the meaning of this? 
One of the Mikado's especial designs 
ted in such a manner! It is a reflec- 
tion on our taste.'' 

"Nine dollars." said the solitary bidder. 

"It is too costly, too precious." and too 
rare in pattern. Wake up. or I'll put it 
back in the box." 

"Ten dollars." the woman said. 

"Well, it doesn't seem as if I can get 
any more, so here it goes. Ten dollars — 
once, twice, three times! Sold to the lady 
there at that shameful figure." 

The lady stepped up, "paid for and re- 
ceived her parcel, and departed, apparent- 
ly without noticing the smiles of the 
audience. — Ohio State Journal. 



The employment of kerosene oil 

as a local application to wounds and ulcers 
is reported by the New York Medical 
Journal. " Ulcers, especially indolent and 
atonic ulcers, were smeared with commer- 
cial kerosene, either pure or diluted (from 
35 to 50 per cent.) with alcohol, by means 
of a small camel's hair brush or with a 
piece of gauze soaked in the solution. The 
appearance and character of the ulcers 
soon changed for the better, the discharge 
gradually diminished, and in from two to 
four weeks the rapidly granulating sur- 
face formed a scar without any contrac- 
tion in the surrounding parts." The ad- 
vantage claimed for kerosene are rapidity 
of action, economy, and freedom from 
poisonous effects. 

An English detective went down to 

Aldershot to search the ranks of a militia 
regiment for a criminal who was "wanted." 
Up and down went the investigator, till Lt 
length he stopped opposite the left-hand 
man of the rear rank, and looked hard at 
him. 

"Come," said the colonel, his dignity and 
esprit de corps not a little offended, "this 
can't be the man you want surely. He's 
the best man I've got in the regiment. 
You don't mean to say you know him? " 

"No," replied the detective, after a 
pause, "I don't — he's the only man in your 
regiment I don't know, and I was wonder- 
ing where he came from." — Ex. 

Bobby — Popper, what do they have 

to have a man to pray for Congress for? 
Mr. Ferry— They don't. He takes a Icok 
at Congress, and then prays for the coun- 
try. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



Only 3 Blocks 

FROM THE 

City Haiju 

'A RAR1L 
OPPORTUNITY 

TOSECURECHOICE 




Thursday, Jan.^3 - 96. 

AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON, AT SALESROOM OF 

MANNONDl 

10 Montgomery St. 
by wore OFTtit PACIFIC IMPROVEMENT CO. 



BALDWIN 



IN 

90 
SUB- 
DIVISIONS) 




280 FT. MARKET ST. 
I 50 FT. VALENCIA ST. 
250 FT. MISSION ST. 
150 FT. TWELFTH ST. 
IOOO FT. ON ADJACENT STS. 
S.W. COR. 15™ AND VALENCIA STS. (140x295.) 
N.W.COR. 17™ AND CASTRO STS. (48 x 90.) 
NORTH S/DE WAU£R ^J/lSr Of Sr/I/VM/V ST. 

EXTRAORDINARY CREDIT TERMS. 

ONLY 25 PERCENT CASH, BALANCE 1, 2 AND 3 YEARS. 

XITI f INSURANCE POLICIES ISSUED TO PURCHASERS BYTHECALIFORNIA TITLE 
III L.C. INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY." AT SPECIAL RATES. 

Baldwin & Hammond 

AUCTIONEERS. 



H 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 




Comstock Business was very dull on Pine street during 
Mining the week just past, and prices have gradually 
Shares. been seeking a lower level. It is just a con- 
tinued case of dry rot and a lack of the men 
financially able to carry out a programme once it has been 
outlined. The mines are in excellent condition for an 
operation, but they might as well be in Jamaica for all the 
influence they can exert in making a market, unless there 
is some one behind the game able to pull the wires intelli- 
gently without getting tangled up in them himself. There 
has been lots of talk for months past about the "magnets" 
not being ready, and all that, but it should be a good 
"ready" when it comes along. The whole fact of the mat- 
ter is that something will have to be done by somebody to 
resurrect matters, and somebody means in reality nobody. 
The brokers are individually helpless to work out the sal- 
vation of all. and individually they arc anything but a unit, 
a condition of affairs which the last election has not served 
to ameliorate or improve. Had Marks been elected mat- 
ters would have looked much brighter than they do just 
now. Affairs are nearing a crisis in the Pine street insti- 
tutions, and a man of his strong calibre would have done 
much to have turned the. tide to victory. But it is no use 
talking about it now. The coming year will tell, after the 
battle with rival concerns has been waged to an issue, amid 
internal strife and jealousies. The Occidental mine is said 
to be looking well in an upraise above the 050-level, 
although the stock has not shown it at all times. Justice 
and Alta were assessed 10 cents during the week, and 
Union Con. 20 cents. 

The Local Brokers in local stocks and bonds report a 
Financial very fair demand for dividend paying secu- 
Outlook. rities of unquestioned merit. Although 
money is plentiful, there is little dabbling 
in outside enterprises. Nevertheless the majority of 
people manage somehow to keep posted upon what 
is going on in the speculative markets, ready for a 
plunge should any of their neighbors take the in- 
itiative with any degree of success. The facts about 
the Bourn clean-up having leaked out, it has once 
more become apparent that all the vitality has not yet 
been sapped out of the community, and that some of the 
old spirit and vim is still in existence — only latent. It is 
safe to make the prediction that some day not very far 
distant, speculation will again be rife in this city, with in- 
numerable opportunities for money making. On Wednes- 
day last the following dividends were payable: Bank of 
California, $3 for the quarter; Pacific Surety Company, 2 
per cent, for the quarter; California Safe Deposit and 
Trust Company, $1.50 for the quarter; Nevada Bank, $1.50 
for the half-year; Wells, Fargo & Co., $3 for the half-year. 
Also, the following monthly dividends: Edison Light and 
Power, 66§c; Oakland Gas. 25c; San Francisco Gas, 35c; 
Pacific Telephone, 30c; Sunset Telephone, 20c. The Cali- 
fornia Lumber Company has levied an assessment of $10 
per share. 

John J. Valentine, President of 
Wells, Fargo & Co., has issued his 
customary annual statement of the 
bullion product of the Coast for 
1895, as follows: California. $14,417,012: Nevada, $2,581,- 
913; Oregon, 11,852,430; Washington, 1552,467; Alaska., 
11,469,420; Idaho, $7,426,898; Montana. $37,832,500; Utah, 
$9,222,052; Colorado, $28,545,659; New Mexico. $2,499,586; 
Arizona, $7,352,776; Dakota, $3,088,785; Texas, 387,340; 
Wyoming, $37,250; British Columbia, $207, (154. Total, 
si is, 104,042. The amount is made up as follows: Gold, 
41.19 per cent,, $48,667,383; silver, 29.85, $35,274,777; 
copper, 22.89, $27,052,115; lead, 0.7, $7,170,307. Silver is 
valued in the statement at 05 cents, copper 11 cents, and 
lead 3.23 cents. The production is the largest since 1891. 
The gold output for California was $10,940,491, in dust and 
bullion by express, and $3,003,017 in bullion and dust by 
other conveyances, making in all $14,004,105. The total 
product for 1804, according to same authority; was $105,- 
113,489. 



The Western Output 

of 

Precious Metals 



American Mines 

for 

American Owners. 



A New Richmond Charles McDermott, whose name and 
In The Field reputation is not altogether unfamiliar 
to old-time mining men in California, 
is about to descend on London with the old Taylor mine or 
the Idlewild. He got the Marble Heart on the same pro- 
position a few weeks ago in Chicago, and this is the reason 
that London has been selected as a dumping ground. It 
is said that for many years expatriated McDermott has 
the audacity to ask $650,000 for these mines, which would 
be a dear bargain at a tenth of the amount, but modesty 
is not one of the gentleman's failings. The enterprise is 
one which should be left severely alone, if for no other 
reason than the fact that McDermott is the promoter. He 
has been in the business before, much to the sorrow of 
many people of standing in this city, but not in any case 
diil he get off with the plunder scot free. English investors 
had better go slow in dealing with this scheme, and avoid 
it entirely if they wish to be safe. 

The New York Financial News says 
of 'our domestic gold mines: "First 
class gold mines need not. go begging 
in any part of the world. Americans 
as yet do not seem to be up to the high prices asked by 
English promoters, consequently but few of our best are 
offered here, finding a ready market and being gradually 
absorbed by foreign capital, which is ever on the alert in 
California, Colorado, and all of our Western mining States. 
The live Yankee, however, is rapidly preparing to work 
and keep his gold mines, having found out that this is the 
'gold era,' and that no other business pays so well when 
properly carried on. We have a dozen South Africas, and 
can afford to keep them." And the biggest South Africa of 
the lot is right at home here in California, and within the 
boundaries of her neighbors on the south and east. We 
want the Monroe Doctrine applied in the case of our mines 
as much as anything else. 

Hammond's The arrest of Mr. John Hays Hammond, 
Latest the distinguished California engineer, by 

Experience, the Boers, among whom he has the misfor- 
tune to sojourn at present, gave rise to 
much anxiety among his relatives and friends in this city 
at first, until the full particulars came to hand by cable. 
It was thought at first that matters were much more ser- 
ious, judging from the exaggerated stories which have 
crept out of the Rand into the outer world. The safety of 
Mr. Hammond from aught save a temporary annoyance is 
now fully assured, which is a subject for general congrat- 
ulation. The other gentlemen from California who have 
likewise suffered for the same cause, will meet with the 
heartiest sympathy in their trouble. 

New York The market during the week has shown little 
Stock improvement. Prices, however, have been 
Market. well maintained, and holders seem less dis- 
posed to part with their stocks. Prices in 
comparison with one week ago show only slight changes. 
The Grangers are from i to 1} percent, higher. L. A N. 
Lake Shore, D. & R. G. have all advanced :i to 1' per 
cent. Manhattan lost 2 per cent. The reorganization 
plan has been accepted on Reading, and the first assess- 
ment of $5 per share is now due. Western Union is still 
selling below 85 on fears of the B. & O. stock coming out 
at any time. Industrials have improved. Sugar has ad- 
vanced 4 per cent. The destruction of plantations in Cuba 
lias strengthened the market. Leather is also stronger. 

The Rawhide Captain W. A. Nevills, who has been con- 
Electric Plant, fined to his room at the Palace with ill- 
ness for some days past, has been able to 
leave for his home at Sonora The new electric plant at 
the Rawhide Mine will be all ready to start up by March 
1st, which will make the company independent of water 
supply for the future. The mine is opening up better than 
ever, and an immense amount of ore is now exposed, ready 
for extraction when the reduction plant is ready. 

From Arizona The Harquahala Gold Mining Company 
to has had such success with their purchase 

West Australia, in Arizona that they are now working 
might and main to even up on a property 
which has recently been purchased at Kalgoorlie in West- 
ern Australia. Mr. R. M. Raymond is just about arriving 
at Kalgoorlie, having been sent for in Arizona last month. 



January is, 1896. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







W?reat deal re in making ;i perma- 

nent record of the little amenities which adorn the 

. lire of this M r _ 

rie Duncan, whose name until recently has pi 
r ornamented the s 
leapt into celebrity at a single bound. This is the way ii 
nappei >t was quite unexpected, too. As with all 

■: our Pour Hundri d, who like to do this BOrt oi 
thins;, the hour for administering to the appetite thai re- 
minds us of the dinner bell bad arrived, and the appetite 
with it, hut her lord— he came not. No well regulated lady 
of our City of the Golden Gate :> going without her dinner 
because her lord lingers. She thereupon glided I 
local Delmonico's, and began to save herself from starva- 
tion, (iood digestion waited on her appetite, and she was 
rather enjoying the luxuries of Messrs. Gutzeil & Mal- 
fantis cuisine, when the door opened and there entered 
her inconstant husband with one of her sex to her un- 
known. The newly-arrived couple seated themselves a1 
another and not distant table. Their dinner began and 
■1. Wife and husband saw each other: they 
glanced, then glared. He forgot the demeanor which 
would have been most becoming, and smirked, winked, 
and made contortions to his wife. Female loveliness is at 
times very lovely, but there is a limit to female patience. 
Madame Duncan, provoked to wrath, gave that single 
bound just alluded to, picked up a half-filled bottle of claret 
and smashed it over the head of her erring lord, with re- 
marks that enquired of his daring to comport himself thus 
and so. This little inadvertent movement of the lady made 
a great deal of trouble, for it resulted in breaking up the 
interesting tete-a-tete of her husband and his second-best 
girl, and induced a baptism of ruby over her husband's 
face that was not all wine. Then, dreaming of criminal 
charges, of murder, and of sudden death, she ran to give 
herself up to the police, who would not receive her ap- 
proaches. Mr. Duncan made no charge, but saved his 
ammunition for the divorce court. It does seem as though 
the rights of married people had got to be more clearly 
defined, so that such disagreeable infelicities may not hap- 
pen to disturb the peaceful current of the stream of matri- 
mony. In the millenium, which we hope will hurry along 
and not keep us waiting, we are suie that people may be 
Da PPy> even though married, and the only improvement 
we really expect is that people will find they can be so 
happy, even though unmarried, that nothing can tempt 
them to seek a greater felicity. 

WHAT'S the matter with the new Valley road, that was 
going to be built like lightning for the good of the 
people and the especial glory of Mr. Demosthenes Preston, 
its sagacious attorney? Merely this and nothing more: 
The people of Fresno happened not to be so everlastingly 
stuck after the new road, as everybody here was made to 
believe everybody was, and so refused to act upon the 
application of the railroad company for permission to con- 
struct the road across the town. Then Attorney Preston 
thought he would teach them a little law. The company 
applied at once to the Supreme Court for a writ of man- 
date compelling the trustees of the town to act, and waited 
to get the writ and swoop down on Fresno, and get the 
permission and build the road right away. Then the 
Supreme Court gave a little chirp, and the great Preston 
and all the little legal assistants found that the chirp 
meant that the writ was denied. That was all there was 
of it. But it was enough. It wasn't as deep as a well, 
nor as wide as a barn door, but 'twas enough, and the 
learned attorney had learned that he couldn't boss an 
executive and legislative body that has a discretion to 
exercise — and went home. It will probably never be said 
that much learning hathmade lawyer Preston mad, though 
his lack of it may make some of his clients so. And now 
the new railroad company will have to follow the directions 
of the statute, which it would better have done before, and 
then, mayhap, may in time build its road through the 
town of Fresno. 



I In- other 1 

We do 

magie Mr, Hill asked his wife 

out for a u ,,,,1 rinding 
thei e 

certain domestic matters be drew his little gun, and wll- 

lully, mall tly, then ami there buried 

several bullets in an. I about her head, neck and body, 
Th, -u he followed the advil >• he hail doubtless given I 
some time beforehand, and. after giving himself up. as 
there wasn't any particular way of escape, he declined to 

be interviewed. Portuuately lie was ao tin the 

a lawyer, who was not just at that tin 

gaged in anything 1 e criminal himself, and in time ap 

peared in court, ami to the charge of murder, 

said he was not guilty. His astute lawyei 

with bis own theory of the ease, and gives out that just 

omenl before he began shooting his wife, he became 

insane, mail as a March hare. If that was so. ol COI I 

was not guilty of murder, and. though the sound of the 
shooting awoke him to the complete recovery of his senses. 
vet no properly endowed jury will think of convicting him. 
Since his lucky plea of insanity came to tin- great minds of 
himself and his lawyer, be has begun to show unmistakable 
signs of mania. He is melancholy, silent, forgetful of the 
past, and will soon, or all symptoms are valueless, begin 
frothing at the mouth. This, at intervals, will occur until 
his acquittal. We shall now wait patiently to see how 
long it will take common sense to ride supreme in the 
Oakland courts, and declare the sanity of the jury by a 
verdict which shall hang Mr. Hill as high as Haman. 

THE people of this city have been regaled with a pre- 
cious lot of scandalous entertainment within the past 
month. If wickedness, and scandal, its dearest parasite, 
are the offspring of the Devil, one may curiously ask if any 
other can tell of what gender the Devil really is. Is the 
Devil only the father of lies, or is she the mother of envy, 
backbiting, deceit, adulteries, fornications, thievery, black- 
mail, and every other kind of wickedness ? We incline to 
the opinion, from our experience and the knowledge wide- 
spread by means of that agent of the Devil, the daily press, 
that the Devil does exist; that said person is neither male 
alone, nor female alone, nor bi-sexual. We think it is mul- 
titudinous, and ubiquitous, and omnipresent, and spiritually 
exists not at any particular place, nor in, nor with any par- 
ticular person, but becometh a part, and a large part, of 
every individual who loves evil and eschews decency. These 
wise reflections come to us voluntarily as we involuntarily 
turn our thoughts to the saintly, gray-haired lady who is 
now living without charge at the public institution on 
Broadway, known as the jail. As the Devil is sometimes 
called a gentleman, so we shall be justified in saying that, 
in this case at least, the Devil is very much of a lady. Doth 
she not quote scripture for her purpose ? Doth she not 
wear the white robes of purity without, and is she not 
within, as are all hypocrites — a whited sepulchre, full of 
dead men's bones and all uncleanliness. Her name has 
been made so infamously well-known of late that only the 
blind, who read not the dailies, do not know it. An allusion 
is as good as a naming, as a wink to a blind horse is as 
good as a nod. 

THE so-called gentleman, who still lingers with us under 
the title of a lord, by a faculty with which he is over 
liberally endowed, manages to do something so superlat- 
ively stupid at least once in seven days, that he keeps his 
dullness everlastingly in remembrance. He has been to 
Stockton and returned by steamer, and displays an un- 
usually swelled head. He explains that it came from the 
berth, in which he lay, meeting his skull, through an inad- 
vertence of his own in attempting to discover why he was 
rudely shocked by the boat's meeting an impediment 
which failed to give way. There is no doubt a way to ex- 
plain the fact that one has a swelled head. It comes in 
various ways. Sometimes it comes by accident, sometimes 
by birth. In the case of this ignoble lord there is no doubt 
he has come by it naturally, and that it has been his from 
his birth. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jamiaiy (8, 1896. 



k i? 



A Book The literary merits or demerits of (ieorgc Mr ri- 
ot the dith have, tor many years, been an open ques 
Week.* tion. Some critics have contended that he is one 
of the greatest of English novelists, whileothers 
have pronounced him the poorest, and the public has 
labeled him as the hardesl to understand. Thai he 1 an be 

powerful snd passionate we know, but that be can 1 b 

scure and artificial we know also. His verbiage may be. 

apparently, senseless, but if one has patience, and a ii 

deal of it. this apparently senseless verbiage may be read 
with profit. His books are of ten full of original investiga- 
tions of the human character, but one requires the patience 
of Job to find them out. Sis most artistic storj is. we be 
lieve, " I liana of the Crossways," and bis "Tale of Chloe," 
and other short stories, arc good beoause their brevity 
serves as a restraint upon his Btyle, Bui whatever doubt 
may have, heretofore, existed about his plaoe in English 
letters, be has, we believe, dispelled it by his last book, 
jusi published in New York, and called "The Amazing 
Marriage." In plain words, then, this book convinces us 

that George Meredith cannol write good ci non sense 

English at all. Ee may be Imaginative and his characters 
maj possess firmness and solidity, while we may wonder at 
the spa rkle of his aphorisms and the dazzling profusion of 
his tropes, yet his English is faulty and his imagination too 
redundant and unrest rained, He will not be clear, and, while 
we do not object to a little obscurity, and rather enjoy the 
necessity of finding ou1 what the author is after, yet 
George Meredith twists and turns, and doubles into a score 
of metaphysical relations which are, too often, Inconsistent 
or foroed. And yet, If we take away all this redundancy 
of figurative Imagery we lose the rich poetic flavor which 
permeates his books, and n is in this fact that the 
peculiarity of bis writings lie. Now can any of our 
readers tell us what on earth the author is driving at 
when, in one sentence in "The Amazing Marriage, he 

says: 

i i at ion of the cries in air at a time of surgent pub- 
lic excitement, can hardly yield us music; and the wording 
>m, by aid of compounds and transplants, metaphors 
and similes, only just within the range of the arrows of 
Phcebus's bov, [that is, the furthest Bight known) would, 
while it might intimate the latest poetry, expose venture- 
some Writers to the wrut.li of a people commendably believ 

ing their language a perfected Instrument, when they pre 

fer the request for a plateful, and commissioning their lit- 
erary police to drain and anions experimenters who enlai ge 
or wing it beyond the downright aim of the mark." 

Now we again ask: What in the name of common sense 
English does the man mean '! We have read this sent, n, .- 
over and over again, and, although W6 are hold enough to 

say that we have some knowledge of our language, vet we 
confess on our knees, and with forehead to the pavement, 
that we are so profoundly unenlightened that we do not 
understand the exact meaning of the sentence we have 
quoted, To us it is a bewildering concatenation. We 

are aware that some well known erities think language of 
this Wind should not lie olijeeted to because it is obscure, 

but, according to our humble judgment, this is too muoh of 
a good thing, and we deny that it is English at. all. The 
admirers of George Meredith may tell us that, this "ob 

scurity " is one of his chief charms, if they will, but we 
would rather have some of the plain English we are aCCUS 

tomed to in Addison, Dickens, Thackeray, Scott, Kipling, 
or the thousand and one inferior authors who are never 

even named as among the first "mat novelists of thl 

The language we have quoted is careless, uncritical, and 
incongruous, Or what sort of conception is one to gel 

from a combination of metaphors such as this: 

"As a consequence, the truisms Hooded him, and he lost 

his guard against our native prosiness. Must we be prosy. 
If we are profound, unequivocally sincere? Do but listen 

totliestnii dering I Spouting extracts from 

poet ry, if we could but hit upon the tight, would serve for a 



relief and a lift when we are ill this ditch of the serious 
vein, (lower Wordseer would have any number handy to 
spout." 

Is t.liis, English? Is it common sense.' Is it, worthy of 
a 111:111 who is, according to some people, " the greatest of 
English novelists " ? What critic or reader wdio values 

his reputation tor knowing "I! from a bull's foot," will tell 

us that < Ieorgc Meredith, in the sentences we have quoted, 

has not sacrificed sense for vail iceit; and this fact 

stares us in the face here and there from the commence 
ment to the close of "The Amazing Marriage." They 

stamp the book with a fatal blemish. Tell us of his wealth 
of description in the book', and we will say: yes, we admit 

it , point out the strong passages and striking episodes and 

we will applaud; remind us of the flesh and blood men and 
women he places before us so that we fancy we know them, 
and we will tell you thai we admit it all, but in face Of 

all this we can say that no adequate motive directs the 

conduct Of the principal characters, and that the book 
crumbles to pieces when it is examined in detail. The as- 
sociation of ideas arc wholly fortuitous and external, and 
w hen. lor Instance, he says : 

"She ceases. According to the terms of the treaty the 

venerable lady's time has expired, An extinguisher de 

SCends on her. giving her the likeness of one under con 
deinnation of the Most. Holy Inquisition, in the ranks of an 

auto 'i<t ft; and singularly resembling that victim at the 

first sharp bite of the II ames she will be when she hears the 
version of her story." 

Are not. the similes here too far fetched, and do not 
their meaning become so obs.CUre that they are lost in 
mist, leaving the reader still wondering what on earth the 

author means? That Mr. Meredith is felicitous now and 

again, we do not deny. He does lad indeed give U8 thai 

wealth of epigram which made "The Egotist" so popular, 
but. yet we find many brilliant things in "The Amazing 

Marriage." But the wonder is that with all his brilliancy 
such a great writer, and in spite of all his faults he is a 

great writer, should give us a conceit of style such as this: 
"There was Madge and the donkey basket-trap ahead on 

the road to the house, bearing proof of the veiled had been ; 

signification of a might have been. Why not a possible 
might be? Still the might-be, the might-be." 
And so it goes on, so 11 begins, and so 11 ends, brilliant 

in part, but, on the whole, disappointing, and all because 

George Meredith insists in writing so that we must read 

him through a Eog. To 'his, we Object because we want 
our books written in plain English, and this is something 

George Meredith does not give us. 
* " An Amazing Marriage," bj Qeorge Meredith. 

It has often been said that. Hacon was a son of Queen 

Elizabeth by the Earl of Essex. Mr. Lawrence Hutton 

has revived this story, and he gives a general review of the 
mam similar rumors Hint were at one time alloat about 

the Virgin Queen. " In Ireland, we know, it Is said to 
this day that the family of Mapother, in the county of Kos- 

n 1 descended from Queen Elizabeth, and other 

stories are to the effect that the Karl of Ormond and the 

Karl of Leicester knew more about Elizabeth's love all airs 
than ordinary men should. But, on the Other hand, Lingard 

discredits all those rumors, and Mr. Hutton uses them, we 
see, to throw ridicule on the pretense that Hacon was the 
Queen's son or thai he wrote Shakespeare. 

It is a pleasure to sec the rising tide of Scott's popular- 
ity, and the reprinting of Miss A 11st iii and \laria , Edge- 
wortfa works. Let us hope that this renewed activity in 

literature will push the guinea dreadfuls of' the 

('ames, mens, and Hardvs out of the field. The books 

published by those morbid and meretricious writers are no 
more to be compared with this revival of classic works than 
" green goods " are to be compared with sound money, 

Scribners have published so many thrashy books lately 
among some good ones that we welcome Professor 

Nathaniel Thaler, of Harvard, on " Domesticated Animals, 
Their Relation to Man, and tolas Advancement in Civiliza- 

1 int the author might have saved us that very old 
quotation. " The mule has no pride of ancestry and no hope 
of posterity." 



January is, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO SEWS LETTER. 




C^f^M»^E^ ^ ^ olor}ial ' 



THE JOURNEY.-«s5<£ c««*Otf*. 

IT is many a year since In >unny weather 
We started, nor cared if the way were long- 
There were Youth. Health, Love, and myself ; together 
We sang, and our voices were clear and strong. 

What joy we had in the beautiful weather! 

How flowery the way that our path lay through ! 
How we laughed in the gladness we shared together ! 

How green were the fields, and the sky how blue ! 

If the sky grew gray, in the rainy weather, 
Why, a dull gray sky could do us no harm ; 

Or if chill winds blew, we were still together, 
Close, close together, and so kept warm. 

But, alas, one day (it was autumn weather) 
Youth stopped, and his face was wan and white. 
" We can journey no more," he cried, ''together ;" 
But he smiled and waved till we past from sight. 

Health faltered next (ah, bad was the weather!) 
" I will join you," he said, "in a little while;" 
So Love and 1 walked onward together. 
With backward glances for many a mile. 

We have gone on since in all kinds of weather , 
We have waited for Health at each stopping-place, 

And we sought in vain, though we sought together, 
For Youth, who left us with wan white face. 

But I have not missed them, nor minded the weather, 

Nor cared if I failed in every quest, 
For Love and I made the journey together; 

Love never left me ; what mattered the rest? 



LIFE'S C0NTRASTS.-rc*rPi5aw. 

Perfume of roses and warbling of birds, 

Sweetest of sweet J une days, 
Kindliest glances and tenderest words, 

Shadiest woodland ways; 
Murmuring brooklets and whispering trees, 
Drowsiest song of the soft humming bees; 
Hope, love, trust, peace. 

And besides— 
I and he, he and 1. 

Wintry winds rustling the fallen, dead leaves, 

Sullen and lowering the sky. 
Creeping mists hiding sad earth as she grieves, 

Mourning for days gone by; 
Cataracts foaming 'neath bare, leafless trees, 
Chilly blasts sweeping o'er lone, barren leas ; 
Heartache, doubts, tears, 

And besides — 
I alone, only I. 



LOVE'S WISDOM.— Alfred Austin. 



Now oq the summit of Love's topmost peak 

Kiss we and part; no further can we go: 

And better death than we from high to low 

Should dwindle or decline from strong to weak. 

"We have found all, there is no more to seek; 

All have we proved, no more is there to know; 

And time could only tutor us to eke 

Out rapture's warmth with custom's afterglow. 

We cannot keep at such a height as this 

For even straining souls like ours inhale 

But once in life so rarefied a bliss. 

What if we lingered till love's breath should fail ! 

Heaven of my earth ! one more celestial kiss, 

Then down by separate pathways to the vale. 



FOR HESPER JOYCE LE GALLIENNE.^/o/w davidson. 



What boat is this comes o'er the sea 
From islands of Eternity? 

A little boat, a cradle boat, 
The signals of the mast denote; 

And in the boat, a little life : 
Happy husband, happy wife! 



Pine and Jones Sti. 



Thr Irmllnir M - I In Snn Franc Uco. 

Klivantlv rurnlfthcd i its, atonic or on 

:i haih 

.tuty and with all Iti accom- 
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to permanent guests. Billiard Room, Elevator, 
oara, 

MRS. S B. JOHNSON,. 

Southeast corner of Pine and .Tones streets. 

m California .Hotel 

Is the only MODERN FIRE-PROOF Hotel in San 

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Its rich and brilliant furnishings and finish niin 

will please the OyO, 

its Table will tickle the 



and its Charges protect the 



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of every Guest. Convenient to business centers. 
Close to all car lines. Every room sunny. 

R. tl. Warfield, Proprietor. 



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Conducted on both the 

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American plan 

Bush street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F. 
This favorite hotel is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Family and Busi- 
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first-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room: Per day. $1.25, $1.50, $1.75 and $2; per week, $7 to $12; 
per month, $27.50 to $40; single room, 50 cents to $1. 

-95~Free coach to and from the Hotel. 



RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C. 



The Hotel " Far Excellence "- 

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all appointments. O. G. STAPLES, 
President; 6. DeWITT, Treas. 



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WASHINGTON, D. C. 
H C. BTJRCH. Manager. 



POPULAR PRICES— Regular rates, $4 per day up. Fifty rooms 
on the sixth floor with steam heat and electric light, reduced to 
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Clergy. 



Occidental Hotel, 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



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San Francisco. 



Fine 

Goods 

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Write for atalogue. 



"In the 
Field of 
Sports." 

New book tree 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 18, 1896. 



John J. Valentine. President, San Francisco. 
George. E. CRAY. First Vice-President. San Francisco. 
DUDLEY EVANS, Second Vice-President, New York. 
Aaron Stein. Secretary. San Francisco. 
H. B. PARSONS. Assistant Secretary. New York. 
HOMER S. KING, Treasurer, San Francisco. 



Office of the President. 




irp & flompang, 



Sati cfiaHcbco, 2)ecein6ct 31, 1895. 

Dear Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia) during 1S95, which shows in the aggregate : Gold, $48,667,383 ; Silver, 135,274,777 ; 
Copper, $27,052,115; Lead, $7,170,367. Total gross result, $118,164,642. The "commercial" value at which the several 
metals named herein have been estimated, is : Silver, 65 cts. per oz.; Copper, 11 cts. per lb.; and lead, $3.23 per cwt. 

Allowance must always be made for probable variations from reported figures, by reason of constantly increasing 
facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the express and the difficulty of getting 
entirely reliable data from private sources. Estimates obtained in this way are liable to be exaggerated and are, to a 
considerable degree, guess work ; but with some modifications on this account, made herein, the general results reached, 
while only approximately correct, may be accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 



Gold Dust and 

Bullion by Other 

Conveyances. 



Silver Bullion 
by Express. 



Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight 



California 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 

Alaska 

Idaho 

Montana 

Utah 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Dakota 

Texas 

Wyoming 

British Columbia 



$10, 



940,491 
1,239.735 

,599,785 
3M,8i7 

[,521,000 
1.500,000 

647,405 
1,386,271 

256,665 
,206,503 
1,475, 7S5 

32,500 
267,654 



$3,063,617 

319.5SI 

150,000 

35,ooo 

1,454,420 



704,785 

1,321,300 
1,230,069 



t 157,229 
662,647 
102,64! 
202,650 

2,723,646 
9,425,000 

1,116,767 
i2,8S8,40i 
293,881 
160,019 
175,000 
380,300 
4,750 



$ 286,575 
359,950 



15,000 

2,182,252 

23.907,500 

6,753,095 

2,270,987 

627,740 

4,756,lS5 

38,000 

7,040 



$14,447, 9 12 
2,581,913 
1,852,430 

552,467 

1,469,420 

7,426,898 

37,832,500 

9,222,052 

28,545,659 

2,499,586 

7,352,776 

3,6SS,7S5 

387,340 

37,250 

267,654 



Total . 



$4o,3SS,6n 



$8,278,772 



$28,292,935 



$41,204,324 



$tiS, 164,642 



The gross yield for 1S95, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 4 i T Vo $48,667,383 

Silver 2 9rW 35,274.777 

Copper 22/5% 27,052,115 

Lead 6^, 7,'70,3C7 



Total $US, 164,642 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAP, COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OP THE MISSOURI RIVETv, 1870-1S9.J 



Year. 


Production as per W. F. 

& Co's Statements, 

Including amounts from 

British Columbia and 

West Coast of 

Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting amounts 

from British 

Columbia and West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Products of the Statts and Territories west cf the Missouri River, exclu- 
sive of British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, are as follows : 




LEAD. 


COPPER. 


SILVER. 


GOLD. 


1870 


$ 54,000,000 
58,284,000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
8o,SS9,057 
90,S75,i73 
9S,42i,754 
81,154,622 
75,349.501 
80,167,936 
84,504,417 
92,411,835 
90,313,612 

84,975,954 
90,181,260 
103,011,761 
104,645,959 
"4,341,592 
127,677,836 
127,166,410 
118,237,441 
111,531,700 
104,081,591 
!05, "3,489 
118,164,642 


$ 52,150,000 
55,7S4,ooo 
60,351,824 
70,139,860 
71,965,610 

76,703,433 
87,219,859 
95,811,582 
78,276,167 
72,6SS,888 
77,232,512 
81,198,474 

89,207,549 
84,639,212 

81.633.S35 
87.311,382 
100,160,222 
103,327,770 
112,665,569 
I26.723.3S4 
126,804,855 
1 '7,946,565 
111,259,508 
103,827,623 
104,844,112 
117,896,988 


$ 1,080,000 
2, 100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,800,000 

5, 100,000 
5,040,000 

5,085,250 
3,452,000 

4,iS5,7£9 
5,742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8,163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 
9,185,192 

9,631,073 
11,263,630 

14,593,323 
",509,571 
12,385,780 

",433,947 
7,756,040 
8,223,513 
7,I70,367 




$17,320,000 
19,286,000 
19,924,429 
27,483,302 
29,699,122 

31,635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,248,137 
37,Q32,S57 
3S,033,055 
42.9S7.613 
48,133,039 
42,975,101 

43.529,925 
44,5i6 599 
52,136,851 
50,833,884 
53,152,747 
64,SoS,637 
62,930,831 
60,614,004 
50,607,601 
38,491,521 
28,721,014 
35,274,777 


$33,750,000 
34,398,000 

38,177,395 
39,206,558 
38,466,488 
39,96S, 194 
42,SS6,935 
44,SSo,223 
37,576,030 
31,470,262 


1871 




1872 




1873 




1874 




1875 




1S76 




1S77 




1878 




1879 




18S0 


$ 898,000 
1,195,000 
4,055,037 
5,6S3,g2i 
6,086,252 
7,838,036 

9,276,755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 
14,793,763 
20 ,569,092 
13,261,663 
19,370,516 

23,631,339 
22,276,294 
27,052,115 


1881 


32,559,067 


18S2 


30,653,959 


1883 


29,011,318 


1SS4 


27,816,640 


1S85 


25,183,567 


1SS6 


26,393,756 


1SS7 


29,561,424 


1S8S 


32,500,067 


1SS9 


29,987,702 




32,527,661 


1S91 


31,795,361 


1S92 


3i,6S5,"8 


1S93 


29,847,444 




33,948,723 


1895 


45,623,291 




48,399,729 



g^r^stssffl^s^ w&^s^o&^jz- -pjsraissrjsa 



^2 f 1 1 i I'c 5 ^> let I'c s o$ 9Kc -V i c o. 



STATEMENT OF THE PRODUCT OF GOLD AND StLVI 



\ND CORRKCTKD FROM 1S77 TO 1895. 



1S79-1S80. 

■ 

iSSi-i!-S;. 

18S2-1SS-,. 

i8S-,-iSS: t . 

I8S4-ISSV 

I8S5-ISS6 . 

I8S6-1SS7. 

ISS7-ISSS. 

IS8S-ISS9. 

ISS9-IS90. 

I890-IS9I . 

I89I-IS92. 

IS92-IS93 

1893-1894. 

I894-IS95 

Total. 





vm. 


To 7 ■ 


,000 


f*4. 837,000 


|25,5S4,O0O 
26,006,000 


:.<TOO 


^,000 


942.OOO 


■',000 


27,7.(2,000 


1,013.000 


29,234,000 


30,2.17,000 
30,266,000 


937.O0O 


29. -,29,000 


956,000 


39,569,000 


30,525,000 


1,055,000 


31,695,000 


32,750,000 


914,000 


33,226,000 


I ',O0O 


1,026.000 


34.112,000 


35,138,000 


1,047,000 


34,600,000 


35,647,000 


I,03I,000 


34,912,000 


35,943,000 


1,040,000 


40,706,000 


41,746,000 


1,100,000 


41,500,000 


42,600,000 


1,150,000 


43,000,000 


44,150,000 


1,275,000 


45,750,000 


47,025,000 


1,400,000 


48,500,000 


49.900,000 


1,425,000 


47,250,000 


48,675.000 


4,750,000 


54.225,000 


58,975,000 


$22,CS9,O0O 


$654,370,000 


|677,O59,O0O 



EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF COLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE ISt OF JULY, 1873, TO THB 

30th OF TONE, 1S95. 



YEARS. 



1873-1874 
1S74-1S75 
I875-IS76 
1S76-1S77 
1877-1878 
1S7S-1S79 
1S79-1SS0 
18S0-1SS1 
1881-1SS2 
18S2-1SS3 
18S3-1SS4 
1S84-1885 

i88^-i8S6 
1SS6-1SS7 
18S7-1SSS 
1888-1SS9 
18S9-1S90 
1890-1891 
1891-1S92 
1892-1893 
1893-1S94 
1894-1S95 

Total 



Cold Dollars. 



$866,743 
862,619 
809,401 
695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521, S26 
492,068 
452,590 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 
340,320 
305,100 
243.298 
308,000 
291,940 
361,672 
553.978 
545,237 



$10,995,294 



Silver Dollars. 



$18,846,067 
19,386,958 
19,454,054 
21,415,128 
22,084,203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24,617,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24,328,326 
24,238,000 
25,527,000 
27,169,876 
30,185,611 
27,628,981 



$534,946,902 



Copper Dollars. 



$15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9,035 
41,364 
16,300 
14,035 
42,258 
11,972 



$203,296 



Summary. — Totals: Gold, $10,995,294 ; Silver, £534,946,902 ; Copper, $203,295. Grand Total, $546,145,492. 

EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTADLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN I537 TO THE END OF THE 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1S95. 



Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


Total. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 
342,893 


$760,765,406 




461,518,225 




929,298,329 






Independence. 


$68,77S,4ii 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557,392 
45,040,62s 


$ iS,575,569 
740,246,485 


$5,235,177 


$ 19,132,961 




790,522,290 




Republic. 


$45,59S,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1S73, to 30th of June, 1895. . 


$10,955,294 


$534,946,902 


$203,296 


$546,145,492 



SUMB1ARY. 
Colonial Epoch — from 1537 to 1S21, $2,151,581,960; Independence — from 1S22 to 1S73, $809,655,251 ; Republic — from 
1873 to 1895, $546,145,492. Total, $3,507,382,703. 

It will be observed that in Current Product — both Gold and Silver— Mexico shows a continued increase. 




/J^^t^#tt) 



President. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 




DEAR EDITH:— The prophetic words of Sarah Bern- 
hardt in New York — when she came back on her very 
last farewell, and for the ''veriest last time!" — concerning 
the coming fashions after Lent must have awakened a 
certain heart-ache in the bosoms of many families. 

Last Suuday, I believe it was, that she landed in 
Gotham, but at once she proceeded to cast consternation 
into the hearts of some thirty million — or, say forty — 
American women, with the statement thai there is about 
to be a revolution in gowns — and that, right away! 

In her na'i.e fashion the great actress declares that no 
more will the Marie Antoinette fashions prevail, but that 
the Empire and Josephine its Imperial Queen would set 
the style — just as if she were living now. 

There is a lovely vision of Marie Antoinette in the famous 
painting by Delacroix when she descended the stern, cruel 
steps of the Conciergerie. This,; with its fantastic, 
diaphanous, filmy lace fissui — whether one calls it a Barthe 
— or anything else — has won the world. 

Once" upon a time Sarah Bernhardt said she could 
start the fashions for the world. Probably she does. 
But, dear me! how she hates the wide bell-shaped skirt and 
the L ' fluffy " sleeve! She pronounces its era past. 

Already I hear from our Parisian friends signals of the 
coming "Disturbance," Madame Bernhardt, who with 
Rejane and others — say Yvette Guilbert among them — 
have managed the fashions, styles, in hats, bonnets and 
clothes and foot-gear for some time, — will endeavor to in- 
duce a Napoleonic Era. It seems that even now the reign 
of white gowns which was the very insistance of the last 
fin de Steele is being restored in Europe. 

As a sign, the introduction of the dainty old-fashioned 
"pattens" — or dainty slippers, with cross straps for the 
ball-room, — certainly marks an inclination to advance to- 
ward the era of the Empire. 

But Madame Bernhardt declares that women have no 
originality about dress nowadays, and she thinks men have 
exaggerated themselves into a perfect stupidity of 
Puritanism. Perhaps the lady would like to watch 
President Cleveland walk down Massachusetts avenue 
arrayed in silk and scarlet, with a swaggering sword at 
his side! — as in old times. 

Nevertheless the fashions of the day hardly apply to 
California. There is too much fur "flying." We have 
not as bad a climate as we think — and it is not half as bad 
as things they whisper about New York. 

But, yet, we will wear furs, and when we can't have 
Russian sable — which costs about a hundred dollars an 
inch, we wear "genteel" substitutes, — how we hate that 
word "genteel I" 

The Chinchilla fur has suddenly become the style after 
the sable, and it's much cheaper in this country than it is 
in Paris, by the way. It is used very effectively on cloth 
and woolen gowns, and one of the prettiest costumes of 
recent date that I have seen is of green cloth, with two 
skirts — the upper one cut into points about the bottom, 
which are edged by the fur. The bodice has a surplice 
front and is trimmed by a band of Oriental embroidery — a 
dream in green and gold. The band edges the surplice 
front, crossing over the bust to the left side. From 
thence it encircles the waist, forming the belt. 

By the way, you must carry a rabbit's foot in polite 
society, just now. Mrs. Cleveland does, and so do most of 
the Senator's wives — just for pure good luck — or "Gliick," 
as the Germans would say. 

Mrs. Cleveland carries hers in her purse; and Mrs. 
Leland Stanford may not be forgotten in the matter, 
when one remembers that the beautiful antique, tiny 
image of St. Joseph and the Holy Infant which never 
leaves her pocket is the emblem of prosperity and good 
luck, according to the old Italian tradition. 

Belinda. 

The Japanese Art Goods and fine cloisonne ware at Geo. T. 
Marsh & Co.'s, under the Palace Hotel, surpass all else in that line. 



— aSfvfe 




M 
TO 

See 
THein. 



Guarantee a perfect fit and grace- 
ful appearance to any variety of 
figure, and are comfortable and 
durable. 

Made in short, long, extra long and 
extremely long waists; four, five, 
and six-hook clasps. 
We take pleasure in recommend- 
ing W. B., for the fit and wear of 
which we hold ourselves responsi- 
ble. We cheerfully and promptly furnish a new pair 
in all cases of dissatisfaction from any cause. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



MME. MflROriftND'S GREME DE Lfl GREME. 



Endorsed by 

W. T. Wenzell. M.D., Ph.G. 

Ph.M. 
Win. M. Searby, Ph.C. 
C F. Jones, Ph. C- 
C. A. Clinton, M.D., ex- 
member Board of Health. 
G. W Gerlach.Ph.G. M .D 
\V M. Logan, Ph.G. M. D 
Dr Lichau, 
] Murphy, and others. 

MME. MARCH AND, H"irand Complexion Specialist, 

Rooms 30 to 41. 121 Post St. Taber's entrance. Telephone 1349. 
Send for booklet. 



A delightful preparation 
for preserving and beau- 
tifying the complexion. 

Awarded diploma at Me- 
chanics* Fair. 1895, for 
superior merit. 

Samples of Creme de la 
Creme given away. 




ft 

Well 

Dressed 

Woman 



Should have 

Fashionable Modes, Well Fitting, 
Perfect in Workmanship and 
Elegant Finish. 

I furnish these requisites. 

Mrs. ft. J. Bradley, Moaiste ' 

313 Geary St , San Francisco. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
"iard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
manners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stablemen, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS. 609 Sacramento St., S. F 



Tel. 5610. 




For the best value in 



HATS or CAPS 



G. Herrmann & Go. 

Tne Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 
Near Pine. (Entire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 



January l8, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.I-: 1 




C<PN 







P«n ebbs « clever people has 

at pains to invent a variety of proverbs for the benefit oi 

Hcvc are .1 few of them: 
ilen bikes run fast. 

Well tired— least tired. 

A - before a fall. 

Bike while the craze is hot. 

Hikers must not be muse 

A ring in time saves crii 

Too many bicycles spoil a walk. 

Spare the pump and spoil the tyre. 

Tired horses never grow weary. 

It is DO use sighing over spilt cycles. 

Where there's a way there's a wheel. 

Between two wheels you come to woe. 

A seat unsound soon finds the ground. 

A novice and her bike are soon parted. 

Mount in baste and the dust you'll taste. 

The lady cyclist has many spokes to her wheel. 

The world's a cycle, aud all society merely cyclists. 

Look at others before you put on rational costume. 

Never run over a magistrate; the pleasure is not worth 
the cost. 

One man can set a beginner ou a bicycle, but ten can't 
keep her there. 

She that rideth uprightly rideth surely, but she that 
perverteth her way shall fall. 

— Mail and Express. 

Wheelmen as a rule are inventive, as is shown by the 
fact that the chairman of the Western Passenger Associa- 
tion has been called upon for a ruling as to whether a 
bicycle in a trunk is subject to the special carrying charge 
which went into effect December 1st. He has decided it is 
not, though the charge will be made on wheels in crates or 
boxes. The next thing on the market will be trunks for 
bicycles and baby carriages. As weight is the basis of 
transportation rates for baggage, the question of size will 
cut no figure. 

The Queen of Italy has been taking a thorough course 
of instruction in bicycle riding, and rides to perfection, so 
say all who have had the pleasure of seeing her perform in 
her private park. As yet she has not appeared on the 
road, but has set the fashion to Italian ladies, and they 
are plentifully seen in public. 



A Mechanical Horror. — Machinery, a monthly journal 
published at Johannesburg, South Africa, gives an account 
of a most remarkable clock belonging to a Hindu prince, 
which the editor thinks the strangest piece of machinery 
in India. Near the dial of an ordinary-looking clock is a 
large gong hung on poles, while underneath, scattered on 
the ground, is a pile of artificial human skulls, ribs, legs, 
and arms, the whole number of bones in the pile being 
equal to the number of bones in twelve human skeletons. 
When the hands of the clock indicate the hour of one, the 
number of bones needed to form a complete human skele- 
ton come together with a snap; by some mechanical con- 
trivance the skeleton springs up, seizes a mallet, and walk- 
ing up to the gong, strikes one blow. This finished, it re- 
turns to the pile and again falls to pieces. When two 
o'clock, two skeletons get up, and strike, while at the 
hours of noon and midnight the entire heap springs up in 
the shape of twelve skeletons, and strikes, each one after 
the other, a blow on the gong, and then fall to pieces, as 
before. 

The Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, has so securely 
established itself as the place which furnishes the best confects, sup- 
pers, etc., at the shortest notice, that it would be idle to speak of com- 
petition in connection with this establishment. Whenever any event 
requiring skillful and polite service and the highest products of the 
chef's and baker's arts, the Original Swain's Bakery is invariably the 
choice. 



ARNES". 



THE 



FOR 



IS 



MOUNT 



96 

THE WHITE I- ■ ■■■! HI M MER IS THE COMER 

HOOKER & CO. 

Retail Store-No. 1640 Market Street. 
Cyclery—Cor. Page and Stanyan Streets. 
Wholesale Dep't- 16-18 Drumm Street, S. F. 

COAST AGENTS FOH 



ARNE 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Montgomery-St. Coffee and Lunch House. Good coffee and fresh eggs 
a specialty. Cream waffles. 420 Montgomery St. H. H. HJUL, Prop. 

Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 
dining and banquet rooms. Tel. 429. A. 13 Blanco & B. Bruno. Props. 
Nevada Restaurant, 417 Pine st. Private rooms; meals 50c. Loupy Bros 
Bay State Oyster House. 15Stockton& lOOO'Farrell. N. M. Adler, Prop. 

MEDICAL 
A Sovereign Remedy— DR PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. Try it. Price 25c. 

George Dahlbender & Co., 214 Kearny street. 
Dr. R. Elmer Bunker has removed to 630 Sutter street. 

Office Hours : 1 to 3 and 6 :30 to 7 :30 P. M. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Thomas L. Hill, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows' Building, southwest corner Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. M. Consultation Hours : 4 to 5. 
Dr. H. G. Young, 

Bridges and teeth without plates. 1841 Polk street. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Holds Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105O'Farrell St., S. F. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 
Neuhaus & Co., 115 Kearny, up-stairs. Suits to order $12 50. Over- 
coats. $10. Pants $4 and upwards. Samples by mail. 
4®* A perfect fit guaranteed. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. "Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 
Joseph Greven, Vocal Teacher, Neumann Piano Store, 82 Ninth St., S. F. 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a uox of ROBERTS' Best. 



ON WHEELS. 



G.&S. 



AXLE GREASE. 



HOME PRODUCTION. 

GOBURN, TEVIS & GO., 107 Front St. 



Does your 



Roof Need Repair ? 

We will examine It without cost, and give 
estimate for putting in good order, and 
keeping it so for a term of years. 

Paraffine Paint Co. M^SST 1 ' 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 




ft VARIETY show had reached Boggo, arid the local 
sky-pilot had let the school-room on condition that 
strict propriety was observed in the performance. "I 
assure you, sir," said the manager, "our entertainment 
is of the most refined and elevating character." " Mind," 
quoth the parson, "I'll be there myself, and at the slight- 
est suggestion of anything wrong my man shall turn out 
the lights." The perfoimance ran smoothly awhile until 
Tambo enquired, " Bones, can you tole me what is the 
most attractive thing in woman ? " Before Bones could 
refer to her beautiful trust in man, her love for her chil- 
dren, etc., the voice of the shepherd was heard in the hall, 
crying, " If there's an answer to that question, out go the 
lights ! " — Exchange. 

" Now, who is that? " asked the dignified hen; 
" That chicken in white and gray? 
She's very well dressed but from whence did she come? 
And her family, who are they? " 

" She never can move in our set, my dear," 
Said the old hen's friend to her, later; 
" I've just found out— you'll be shocked to hear — 
She was hatched in an incubator." 

—Harper's Round Table. 

A LIQUOR case was on trial, and one of the officers who 
had made the raid testified that a number of bottles were 
found on the premises. "What was in the bottles?" 
asked the judge of the witness. "Liquor, your honor." 
" What kind of liquor?" "I don't know, sir." "Didn't 
you taste it or smell of it? " " Both, your honor." "What! 
Do you mean to say that you are not a judge of liquor? " 
"No, sir; I'm not a judge; I'm only a policeman." The 
witness was excused from answering any further questions. 
— Green Bag. 

I have before me a letter from a Persian friend, a gen- 
tleman of some literary note in his own country, who in- 
forms me that he is learning English by the aid of a small 
text book and a dictionary, without any other instructor, 
and he adds: " In small time I can learn so many English 
as I think I will come to the America and goon the scaffold 
to lecture." — Methodist Herald. 

" I can see no reason," said the S. P. C. A. boarder, 
" why it should be thought advisable to dock a horse's 
tail." " Probably," suggested the Cheerful Idiot, "they 
are docked for being behind." — Indianapolis Journal. 

" Doctor, I want a tooth pulled. I'm a great coward 
when it comes to enduring pain, and yet I'm afraid of both 
laughing gas and chloroform." "You might be happy 
with either." — Chicago Tribune. 

The scales arranged upon the fish 

Like shingles, roughly speaking, 
Are thus put on by nature to 

Prevent the fish from leaking.— Am. Homes. 

Green — I wonder who first started the word hello when 
talking through the telephone. Teller — It must have 
been some one who saw how easily the syllables could be 
reversed. — New York World. 

Mils. Dim isti ii' — Bridget, wlieqe are the nuts for dessert? 
Did you crack them? Bridget — Shure an' Oi' didn't, 
mum. I couldn't get me teet' t'roo 'em. — Globe Democrat. 

Bachelor — I am told that a married man can live on 
half the income that a single man requires. Married 
Man — Yes; he has to. — Town and Couutry Journal. 

'T11 \ r young doctor makes an immense number of calls 
on Mrs. Oglesby. Is she very sick? " "No; she is very 
pretty." — Truth. 

Pa — What's baby crying for, Dolly? Dolly — Just cos 
I showed her how to eat her cake. — Pick-Me-Up. 

The furnishing goods sold by John W. Carmanv,25 Kearny street, 
are worn by the best-dressed men in the city, because the goods are 
the best in the market and the variety is complete. 



BANKING. 



Tbe Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, mechanics' institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, $300,000. 

officers 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. IS. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 
Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $l ,250,0u0 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

James K. Wilson President. C. F. A. Talbot, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill, Cashier. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, Charles Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, 
Wm. P. Johnson, C. F. A. Talbot. James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York — Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston—Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics" Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 536 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash. $1,000,000. Reserve Fund $ 715,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1895 $30,727,586 58. Guaranteed Capital. .$1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, B. A. Becker; Vice-President, Edward Kruse; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muiler. 

Board of Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign, Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building, 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS. 
Wm. Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon 

Adam Grant W. S, Jones J. B. Lincoln. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND Secretary 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100.000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

OM I t H T O. AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PATENTS. 

BOONfc & MURD0GK, (E. F. Murdock. Jno.L. Boone). 
San Francisco Office: Nucleus Building, Cor. Market and Third Sts. 
Washington Office : Opposite Patent Office. 




REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING 



January 18, 189ft. 



FRANCISCO Ni;\\s LK1 








THE Tn bpboni "S Siiipboabd " Lately the Brsl 
perhnents with a I oonnectton bel 

ship and the shore were made in Kiel, on the guard- 
dal, and resulted very favorably," says Der 
icr Weisen (Vienna). "In future, accordingly, it 
will be possible for all the ships that lie near a buoy in 
Kiel harbor to be connected by telephone, not only with 
telephone system of the city, bu| also with the" other 
3 in harbor. The central office of |the ship telephone 
m is in the torpedo depot. Prom a small temporary 
wooden building run wires through the water to the same 
buoy, so that the connection is thus made without trouble. 
If a vessel leaves its buoy, it disconnects the wire from the 
ship's telephone, and if it approaches one it makes con- 
nection. The communication of the ship with the different 
port authorities and with purveyors of provisions, hitherto 
fraught with so great inconvenience and delay, has by this 
innovation been greatly facilitated, and it is also of note- 
worthy use for signaling purposes." — Translated for The 
Literary Digest. 

Tmk Tims of I'kahi.. — We have been taught to believe 
that the beautiful iridescence of pearls and mother-of- 
pearl is caused by striations or fine grooves on the surface 
of the nacre, just as the iris of a dove's neck is due to the 
striations of the plumage; but according to Mr. C. E. 
Benham. although a little of the color is produced in this 
way. most of it is caused by interference of the rays of 
light by reflection from the outer and inner surfaces of the 
thin layers of nacre forming the substance of the pearl. 
The colors of a pearl have therefore a similar origin to 
those of a soap bubble, or the iridescence of ancient glass 
which has been scaled by time. 

Bangs of Vision on Water. — A man whose eyes are 
exactly 6 feet from the ground, standing on the beach so 
that the water just touches his feet, could see a ship at a 
distance of a little over two and three-quarter miles, and 
beyond this she would disappear. For each foot above the 
surface of the water you can see a little over one nautical 
mile, for each mile you cau see eighty-three and a half 
nautical miles. People who go long voyages on ships are 
always surprised at the small number of other vessels they 
meet. But the simple explanation of this fact is the really 
very limited range of vision one has from a ship's deck. 

Effect of Telephone upon Hearing.. — "A peculiar 
effect of the use of the telephone," said a telephone 
company official the other day, "is the increased acute- 
ness of the left ear. The sensitiveness of the left ear is 
abnormally developed by frequent telephone practice, and 
the right ear, not generally used, shows a marked 
deterioration in the ability to discern sound. Put the 
transmitter to your right ear, and then .you will realize 
how much the sense of hearing has been sharpened in the 
other organ. — Philadelphia Record. 

The Latest in Menu Cards. — New menu cards come 
in the form of fruits and vegetables, such as apples, pears, 
potatoes, cucumbers and lemons. They are colored like 
the natural fruits, and the menu is written on the other 
side. The cards are fastened to apiece of satin ribbon, on 
which is printed the name of the guest. — Philadelphia 
Record. 

OUR Life in the Present. — Enjoy the blessings of this 
day, if God sends them; and the evils of it bear 
patiently and sweetly; for this day is only ours, we are 
dead to yesterday, and we are not yet born to the morrow. 
— Jeremy Taylor. 

The Grand Canyon Line I — To the East. 
The "Santa Fe Route " Popular Overland Excursions to Chicago 
and Eastern cities will leave every Wednesday. Manager in charge. 
Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are run to Chicago 
every day. This is the only Line by which the Grand Canyon of the 
Colorado River can be reached. Send for illustrated book giving 
full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. G. P. A., 644 Market St., Chronicle 
Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



BANKING. 
BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

C»plt*t P»td 1 ; 

HEAD fti I,,. mm 

Brah 

■■ 

■ 

»v»IUt 1 Approved 

upon 

Niu , 
Lronpooi -North . 
Companv; Ikvi wi> 
iUl hi. \ L01 



.nada; Cm 

1 Linen 

don Hank ol 

■ \ and 
Japah .nit .>r India, .1 China; Australia and 

New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banltln 
Sydney, Ld; Dbmbrara and Tiukidad (VI ■ . i Bank, 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Ootobor 1, 18M) . . 3.158,128 n 

william ALVORD President I CHARLES a. BISHOP Vice-Pn 

ALLEN M. clay Se< rotary THOMAS bkown C 

S. Prentiss Smith..., Ass't Cashier | I P. Modlton Sd Ass'l I 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York. x. it. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Roths- 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Preres: Virginia City (New)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank ol 
New Zealand; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India. Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, June 30, 1895 $24,303,873 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,643,277 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. M. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED, 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve t $375,000 

San Francisco Office— 424 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St. 
Portland Branch— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER | Ass't Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,600,000 | Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

Reserve Fund 8800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, Loudon 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the Loudon, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Preres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissouiere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENBAUM !»,„„„„„ „ 
C. ALTSCHUL } Managers, 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK ™ san peancisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital «1,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. P. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 I Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) M „ na „ pr „ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL/ managers. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1896. 




THE aged Theodore Tilton, who was one of the most 
earnesl American patriots when he lived in this 
country, recently, lias written a long letter to Elizabeth 
Lady Stanton on the occasion of her eightieth birthday. 
While it refers chiefly to Woman's Rights, there is one 
very noble paragraph which runs as follows: 

"Writing as 1 do from Europe, and as a student of the 
slow politics and of the sluggish progress of the Old World, 
I more than ever hate the feudal system, and I more than 
ever scorn the hereditary principle of monarchic govern- 
ment. Nevertheless, just across "the Silver Streak" — 
and distant hardly a half-day's journey from where 1 live 
— there is a lady now nearly of your own age. who for the 
[as1 Bf ty or more years— (a period coincident with your 
own public career)— has furnished, in corroboration of your 
own political philosophy, a continuous example of woman's 
. lor the loftiest of political responsibilities. I refer 
to the venerated occupant of the British throne; who, I 
make bold to say, has surpassed any and every king, 
emperor, prince and masculine ruler of our time in the un- 
broken success of a reign which, as a woman, she has 
rendered phenomenal by her never-failing good sense, by 
her unerring judgment and by her exemplary life. 

"I will venture a prediction. All Europe is now an 
armed camp. Five nations may find themselves in a whirl 
and fury of war in thirty days. When are we to see a 
univei [lament? It will be when our military mad- 

ness shall lie cowed down by woman's voice; when our 
murderous politics shall be softened by woman's spirit; 
and when our international law shall be leavened by wo- 
man's wit." 

From so stern a sana-culottt as Tilton, this is a remark- 
able acknow ledgment. 

In estimating the efficiency of the United States 

navy considerable allowance has to be made for the fact 
that a very large number of men in the American war- 
ships arc Englishmen, and it is not credible that all of them 
would tight against their own countrymen: indeed, although 
serving under another flag, the majority would, we have 
no hesitation in saving, be too patriotic to serve against 
their own country, and would find a means of leaving the 
service, says Court Journal, The crews of American war- 
ships are a hybrid lot. .For instance, the Chicago's com- 
plement is made up of Englishmen, Danes, Swedes, Dutch- 
men, Germans, Spaniards, Frenchmen, Russiaus, and 
negroes, native-born Americans, numbering, perhaps, one- 
fourth of the ship's crew. 

A Madagascar correspondent of a Paris paper 

gives the latest particulars of the invasion of that hapless 

island by French soldiers, and sums up by bestowing the 

of the war entirely upon melinite; it was the bombs 

filled with that c> plosive which committed the havoc that 

d the Queen to hoist a white Hag. The first bomb 

that fell at live minutes past three in the courtyard of the 

Pake i told, killed twenty-six Hovas; the second 

bomb which fell in the court at ten minutes past three 

killed eighteen Hovas; the bomb that fell at a quarter 

past three killed forty soldiers and wounded a hundred; at 

nineteen minutes past three the Queen, fearing the result 

of the extra minute, hoisted the signal which proclaimed 

i oat. 

The Gaulois tells its readers of an English custom 

observed on Christmas eve, which reads really a little bit 
like news. All the young girls assemble round a large 
punchbowl, the liquid is then set fire to, ai.d in that 
flamboyant condition is ladled out into small and exceedingly 

thin glasses, rivalling the renowned Venetian glass. It is 
all tin: better if a girts glass breaks in her hand, as she is 
married before the end of the next 


Achilles in blB tent contrary, al frees the hero from vexation, 

■'. ii 1 1'.' ihe Trojans gain the Briugs all the Greeks of woe sur- 
ase ''■ 
ee now matters quickly vary, To chariot wheels an application, 
imes, the Greeks win In the fray. Of the C. & S. famed Axle Grease. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 
309 and 311 Sansome St. San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

FUERST BROS. & CO 2 and 4 Stone St., New York 

INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY. OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 

PHEiMIX INS. CO. OF BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Assets, $5,783,243 Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,6111 Jul 

THE AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Assets, $2,296,083 Surplus to Policy Holders, $697,627 

PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Assets ,098,77* Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,889,252 

THE SVEA FIRE INS. CO. OF GOTHENBURG 

Assets, $5,493,831 Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,083,321 

Pacific Department, 407-409 Montgomery street, 

BROWN, CRAIG A CO., Managers. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager, 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insukance. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 3. 192. uu l till 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,506,400 11 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 401 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF AIX LA 'CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1825 

Capital. 12,250.00c Total Assets, $6,854,653 65 

UNITED STATE EPARTME.'NT: 204 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Est8bUs »*» '«*■ 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated ™ 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California si , S F. 

George ETHall 

Agent and importer of 

^ FOREIGN WINES. 

MUTUAL LIFE BUILDING, 222 Sansome St . 



January is 



KRAXC n-R. 



BONNET 



w 



II AT '.» Edc 



II ««r«in»t lh. 

Mack and Matani ink* 
Why with a • |olrt hr no » u»tt link, 
"»» »n »rni)r in Its prattling flow. 
lli> pen is mightier than hi< sword we know, 
And yet, •omttimes. *,- at,- dispooad lo think 
That bis pen pellet.* arc but ball* of mink. 
Such as the Chinese at earn other throw. 

Ami when they break— let Britishers beware. 

No smokeless powder Modi them on their way. 
But winged with wheezing* o( asthmatic broth. 
Foelid and thick, they (ill the atmosphere 

With rank bewildering vapors that dismay. 

And stretch the foe in suffocating death, i.. ,\. k. 



Wood PsiSBBvraa in Switzerland. — A simple, effec- 
tive, and cheap way of preserving wood from decay is 
practised iu Switzerland in the preparation of posts tor 
the telegraph service. A square tank, having a capacity 

of some 200 gallons, is supported at a height of '211 feet or 
25 feet above the ground by means of a light skeleton 
tower built of wood. A pipe drops from the bottom of the 
tank to within 30 inches of the ground, where it is con- 
nected with a cluster of flexible branches, each ending 
with a cap having an orifice in the centre. Each cap is 
clamped on to the larger end of a pole in such a manner 
that no liquid can escape from the pipe except by passing 
into the wood. The poles are arranged parallel with one 
another, sloping downwards, and troughs run under both 
ends to catch drippings. When all is ready, a solution of 
sulphate of copper, which has been prepared in the tank, is 
allowed to descend the pipe. The pressure produced by the 
fall is sufficient to drive the solution, gradually, of course, 
right through the poles from end to end. When the 
operation is ended, and the posts dried, the whole of the 
fibre of the wood remains permeated with the preserving 
chemical. — Work. 



Lively in Imagination. — Bridget O'Hoolihan, an elderly 
Irish cook, had been induced to go to a quiet little subur- 
ban town to live in a wealthy gentleman's family. Two 
weeks after her arrival she declared her intention of re- 
turning to the city. ' ; Why do you leave us, Bridget?" 
asked her mistress, in a grieved tone; "we pay you the 
very highest wages." " Ye do, ma'am, an' yer a perfect 
leddy. Oi'm not lavin' troo anny fault av de fam'ly, but 
this place is such a dead old place, wid no chance to do 
anything loively in it, that, begorry, oi have to mek up a 
pack o' lies iv'ry time oi go to confession, or oi'd have 
nothing to confesh! " — Current Literature. 



Charley's Day Off. — General Joseph E. Johnston, the 
Confederate commander, now dead, used to relate that in 
the hottest part of one of the early battles of the Civil 
War he felt his coat-tails pulled. Turning about, he 
recognized a young man who had been employed in his 
tobacco factory previous to enlistment. "Why are you 
not in your place fighting? " the general demanded, 
angrily. " Why, I just wanted to tell you that, if you 
don't mind, I reckon I will take my day off to-day! " — Cur- 
rent Literature. 

Paderewski's Cherries. — A lady visiting Paderewski's 
villa in Paris recently, noticed a cherry-stone on the 
mantelpiece. She took possession of it, and had it set in 
pearls and diamonds as a relic of the master. A few weeks 
later Paderewski met this lady, who, in the course of con- 
versation, showed him the ' cherry-stone with its elegant 
setting. "But, madam," said Paderewski, stroking his 
locks, "I never eat cherries. The one you found on the 
mantelpiece must have been left by my servant! " — Current 
Literature. 



COLONEL Sutherland was in Chicago during the week 
on his way West to this city. 

" For me," said Theophile Gautier, "the new found oyster is more 
wealthy than the pearl in its shell!" Moraghan, in the California 
Market, believes him, and supplies them. 

Mothers, be sure and use ''Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething 



^* nay u well know 
what chimnej t« > p i f.>r your 
burner or lamp. 

Writ \ Macbeth Co, 

Pittsburgh, Pa, for the "Index 
to Chimneys." 

Pearl glass, pearl top, tough 
glass. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 
Oceanic Steamship Company. 

■ annual ding ot the stockholders of tl leanlo Stoani 

ship Company »ni be held at tbe office ••< lbs sompanv, an Uarkol 
Btreot, Sim Franolsoo, Cal , on 

TUESDAY, thi 181 DAT! OP JANUARY, 1896, 
ill the hour 01 IfO'OlOC \ M fortl lection Of a Board of Directors Iiisitiv 

rorthei and the transaction of suob other business as mto 

eroro the meeting Transfer Boobs will oloseon Friday, .Inu. ni, 
Se/olockp. it k. it SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 32? Market street, San Francisco, Oal. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

Pajaro VaMey Railroad Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pajaro Vnllev 
Railroad Company will lie held at the office of the company,.?-'? Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY. THE aim DAY OF JANUARY. 1896, 
at I lie hour of llo'oloek A. H., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
tosetve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Thursday. 
January 9th, at 3 o'clock p M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 3.'" Market street. San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pacillc Auxiliary 
Fire Alarm Company will be held at the office of the company, room 14, 816 
Bush street, Sao Francisco, Cal.. on 

TUESDAY. JANUARY 2IST, 1896, 
at 11 o'clock A. m , for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to 
serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as 
may come before the meeting. w HANSON, Secretary, 

Office— Room 14, 816 Bu sh street. San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
San Francisco Gas Light Company, 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the San Francisco Gas Light 
Company will be held at the office of the company, at 12 o'clock M. on 
TUESDAY - . January 21, 1896 WM. G. BARRETT, Secretary 

San Francisco, January 7. 1896. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending Dee. 31, 1895. a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four and thirty-two one-hundred ths (4 32-100) per cent, per annum on 
term deposits and three and sixty one hundredths (3 60 100) per cent, per 
annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payabte on and afte. Wednes- 
day, January 1, 1896 Dividends not called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of dividend as the principal, from and after January 1, 1896. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. San Fr ancisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31st, 1895, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and twenty-six one hundredths (4 26-l(j0) per cent 
per annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty-five one hundredths 
(3 55-100) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after Thursday, January 2, 1896 

Office— 526 California street. GEO. TQURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Deo. 30, 1895. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (1) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six months ending December 31, 1895, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and after January 2. PS96. ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary, 



DR. 



R I PO R l"V ^ RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
nl " unL ' ° ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 

Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Aoademy of Medicine, Paris, 

and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 

J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 

Sent by mail or express anywhere. 
PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, SI 25; of 100 pills, 82; of 200 pills, 

$3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, (2. Send for circular. 



GIGflR. 




The latest and the best fcrand out. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i8, 1896. 



THERE was a good bit of grumbling engaged in last 
week that the earlier portion of it should have been 
so comparatively barren of events, and so much crowded 
into Friday. To be sure, Mrs. Foute's card party was 
composed mainly of elderly ladies belonging to her hus- 
band's congregation, and, therefore, hardly counted with 
the buds; but there were two luncheons, the teas of Mrs. 
George Pope and Miss Eleanor Woods, the McMonagle 
dinnerparty, Mrs. Sam Knight's second "at home,'' the 
cotillion at Miss Grace Sabin's, the Friday Fortnightly 
gathering, and the dinner dance given by the officers of 
the " Adams," at Mare Island, which was attended by 
several from the city. 

Miss Cora Smedburg's tea last week was one of the 
pleasantest of the month. Miss Frances Curry's bud 
luncheon the same day was in honor of Miss Virginia Bel- 
knap, of Nevada, who was also chief guest at the Sabin 
cotillion, which was one of the prettiest of the present 
season. The national figures, of which there were five, 
representing America, France, Germany, Ireland, and 
Spaiu, were novel, and the favors were appropriate to the 
countries. Miss Sabin and George Gardiner were the 
leaders, and acquitted themselves remarkably well; supper 
was served at tlte-a-llte tables at midnight, after which 
there was general dancing till a late hour. 

Oue of Oakland's belles, Miss Jessie G'asscock, was the 
leading feature at the dance of the Friday Fortnightlies 
last week, as she assisted Mr. Allan Wright in his first 
attempt as cotillion leader, and the figures they introduced 
were among the prettiest danced this season. 

The " Chimmie Faddcn " reading at the Christian Asso- 
ciation Hall, on Saturday afternoon, was well attended. 
Mrs. S. M. Van Wyck gave a tea to welcome Miss Averill 
on her return from abroad, and in the evening the dance 
of the Saturday Night Club brought the week to a pleas- 
ant conclusion. On Sunday Mrs. Bixler gave her monthly 
Sunday musicale. The selections were purely classical in 
character — Miss Sophie Newlands, the vocalist of the occa- 
sion, Mrs. C. Carr and Messrs. Beel and Heine the instru- 
mentalists. 

The wedding on Tuesday evening of Miss Gertrude 
Napthaly and L. B. Feigenbaum at the Concordia Club 
was one of the most beautifully arranged bridals that has 
ever taken place in this city. The spacious rooms of the 
Club — used thus for the first time for such an event — 
afforded an opportunity which the decorators were not 
slow to take advantage of, and the result was a charming 
effect which won murmurs of admiration from all. Light, 
that powerful factor in a brilliant scene, was introduced 
by means of tiny incandescent lamps strung along ropes of 
smilax and hung from chandelier to chandelier, their varied 
hues looking like illuminated flowers. It was the bridal 
bower, however, which won the chief expressions, of de- 
light; it was formed of blue and white gauze in folds 
draped towards the centre, from which hung the marriage 
bell composed of camelias, hyacinths, and white rose buds; 
the tongue of the bell had a colored lamp hidden amid the 
flowers. The front of the bower was ornamented by a 
broad white ribbon tied in a true-lovers knot, and from 
each end at the sides hung a smaller bell. The filling in of 
a background of ferns and smilax at the back and sides 
was charming in contrast with the snowy white, a large 
star at the back being surrounded by electric lamps. Al- 
together the scene was one never surpassed in our society. 
The guests were received upon arrival by Mr. Napthaly 
and Maurice Schmidt, and seated in semi-circles awaited 
the coming of the bridal cortege; promptly on time the 
Rev. Rabbi Voorsanger appeared and with the groom 
and his best man, Julius Feigenbaum, took positions under 
the canopy of the bower. When the strains of the 
Lohengrin chorus announced the coming of the bridal 



party, first appeared Maurice Schmidt's little daughter 
Aimee, looking like a veritable fairy in white silk. From 
her waist was a broad band of white ribbon, the ends of 
which were held by a little girl in pink, Miss Ermie Clay- 
burg, and Master Robbie Roos. Then followed the ushers. 
J. M. and Samuel Napthaly, George Roos, and Morris 
Lowenstein, two and two, and then the bridesmaids, the 
Misses May Schlessinger, Rose Goslinsky, Hilda Brown, 
Mabel Gerst, Edith Schmidt, and Elsie Cook, and the 
Maid of Honor, Miss Dorothy Hermann. Last of all ap 
peared the fair bride, and every eye was upon her as she 
walked slowly forward leaning upon the arm of her father, 
and joined the group in the bower. The ushers took 
positions on the side behind the bridesmaids, the children 
in front; the whole effect was a delightful one. After the 
ceremony was completed by Rabbi Voorsanger, congratu- 
lations were in order, after which there was dancing until 
midnight, when a magnificent supper was served by 
Ludwig in '.the banquet hall of the Club, which had been 
elaborately decorated with flowers and electric lights, 
the special feature being an immensemonogram, F. and N. 
in golden iridescent lamps resting against a background 
of green foliage. Dancing was resumed after supper and 
kept up until daylight. The toilettes of the ladies were 
elegant in the extreme, and the display of jewels dazzling. 
The bride's gown was of heavy white satin with a long 
train over which the tulle vail hung in fleecy folds; rare 
old family lace was used in draping the low necked bodice. 
She wore a girdle of orange blossoms and carried a bou- 
quet of the same mingled with lilies of the valley. The 
maid of honor wore white silk trimmed with lace; the 
pretty bridesmaids were all gowned in pink silk and 
carried bouquets of La France roses. Mrs. Napthaly, 
mother of the bride, wore a robe of pearl colored brocaded 
satin trimmed with point lace and a profusion of diamonds; 
Mrs. Morris Schmidt, Mrs. Anspacher, and the Mesdames 
J. and B. Feigenbaum were especially noticeable for their 
exquisite gowns. Mrs. Schmidt's sapphires were also very 
beautiful. Owing to the serious illness of the groom's 
father his mother was also absent from the marriage 
festivities of their son. The newly wedded couple will 
reside with the Napthalys at their home on Post street. 

To-day the Hecht residence will be the scene of a dual 
silver wedding celebration, the participants being Colonel 
and Mrs. M. H. Hecht and Mr. and Mrs. Louis P. Wiell, 
both couples having been married in Baltimore on the 
same day twenty-five years ago. The Walter-Merteif 
nuptials will be one of the events of Tuesday next, taking 
place at the home of the bride on Van Ness avenue. The 
dance given at the Simon residence on Saturday evening 
was made the occasion for the announcement of Miss Stella 
Greenbaum's engagement to Alfred Simon; and among 
other recently made known engagements are those of Miss 
Jennie Cheeseman and W. H. Schumacher; Miss Carrie 
Heller and I. Fleishman; Miss Henrietta Sullivan and 
S. L. Harris. 

The wedding of Miss Sophie Kaufman and Frank Bowers 
was a home ceremony on Monday last at the Kaufman 
residence, on Mason street, only relatives and intimate 
friends being present. 

Luncheons have taken a leading place this week, Mrs. 
Theodore Payne appearing first on the programme, her 
party on Monday being composed of married ladies only. 
Mrs. Robert Fry's luncheon "on Tuesday was in compliment 
to Miss Belle Grant, the bride-elect of young Pond, and 
her company were an equal number of maids and matrons 
to the number of two score. Miss Lottie Wood's luncheon 
on Wednesday had Miss Mattie Whittier, who has recently 
returned from Europe, as a guest of honor. 

The event of the week was the Leap Year bal poudre of 
the Friday Night Cotillion Club last night; the Leap Year 
cotillion of the Friday Fortnightly Club will not take place 
until the 7th of February, the last meeting before Lent. 

-Mr. E. A. Wiltze, who, in London, has been taking such 
a prominent part in efforts for the safety of John Hays 
Hammond in South Africa, was a well known figure in San 
Francisco society a couple of seasons ago, as he was quite 
a popular beau with the girls during his frequent visits to 
the city from Auburn, where he was in charge of mining 
property. 



January 1 8, 1896. 



KRAXCISCO M V. - 11 , 






to the cards issued by Mrs .1 II Je* iracing the 

ill a 

og woman 
made her debut less than I under thi 

■ York Chaptei laughters of the 

thsir entertainment at the Waldorf i 
Riven upon the aiinix- the Battle of Lexington. 

Her remarks upon < - were graphic and often 

piquant, her interpretation of illustrative poems, 
finished dramatic art. Mrs. Jewetl gave her protege 1 the 
advantage of an excellent and picturesque Btage setting, 
complete in every detail. The entertainment concluded 
with musical selections by Mis> Adler. Mr. Solomons, and 
Miss IVatt. and was voted a gri M The next re 

cital takes place January 18th at2p.it., and illustrates 
nial life in New York. Pennsylvania, and Virginia. 

It is rather singular that with the well known fondness 
thai so many of our residents possess for copying every- 
thing English, that Twelfth Night parties have this year 
been an almost unknown quantity. It was of a surety 
thought that Uurlingame. at least, would have done some- 
thing to honor that date. There were one or two gather- 
ings in the city; among them the one held at the residence 
of Mr. Robert Bruce on Jackson street, when, after the 
King and Queen had been chosen in the persons of Law- 
rence Van Winkle and Miss F. Currey, games appropriate 
to the night were the chief feature, followed by supper 
and dancing, and a most delightful affair it proved to be. 

Much to the regret of their friends on shore, the sailing 
of the flagship Philadelphia carried away the officers of 
that ship, who are among the most popular who have ever 
been on this station; and though they will doubtless re- 
turn, it may not be just yet awhile, and at present they 
were much wanted in our social circles. There were sev- 
eral very pleasant breakfasts given on board prior to 
their departure, and the return of the Philadelphia will be 
looked forward to with pleasure whenever that may be. 

Large dinners have been the rule this month, and they 
are apparently not deemed worthy the name unless there 
are from twenty-five to thirty guests thereat. Recent 
dinner hostesses include Mrs. William Haas, Mrs. Chauncey 
Winston, Mrs. J. F. Houghton, Mrs. McKenna, and Mrs. 
Sigmond [Stern, whose dinner was in celebration of the 
wedding of Miss Elsie Meyer and Abe Stern, which took 
place in New York the same day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Newlands are again occupying 
their residence in Washington City, where their daughter, 
Miss Edith, is one of the buds of the present season in that 
gay capital. Mrs. Henry Scott, who is such an energetic 
and indefatigable traveler, meditates leaving us again in 
the near future. This time her destination will be Europe, 
whence she departs for a visit in about six weeks from 
now. 

The Grand Ball of the Hellenic Society last Saturday 
night at Union Square Hall was a splendid success. 
But the prettiest feature was the patriotic speech de- 
livered by the belle of the Greek Colony, Miss Anathasia- 
dou, in honor of Greece and the United States. 

Mrs. Charles Matthews gave a delightful Theatre party 
at the Baldwin last Monday night to a number of visiting 
Eastern friends. Afterwards there was a delicious 
supper. 

A grand vaudeville and athletic entertainment for the 
benefit of the Olympic Club will take place at the Columbia 
Theatre on Monday evening, January 20th Local talent 
and members of the club will take part. 

The genial composer and Prince of Bohemia, W. S. Bar- 
ton, author of so many famous songs, has just arrived from 
New York, and will visit us for two months. 

Mr. J. H. Jahns and Mr. F. Dohrmann, Jr., of the firm 
of Nathan, Dohrmann & Co., left on Friday for the East 
and Europe. 

Miss Gwendolin Oberton, of Los Angeles, is the guest of 
Mrs. Colonel Kimball at her residence on Pacific avenue. 

Mrs. B. W. Paulsen intends to leave the end of this 
month for the East. 



8th no 

\V. 1sl1inet1.11 to III 
latine; to the ti ■ ■ 

Rivers II Bboul two months 



-•tt ,v 
i.'iT on the 

un important Hill re 
of tli. uiii and H 



Till', well known linn of George Mai 
ornia street, having retired from tin 



.it 



"f 

the Transatlanl I 1.' of Hamburg, al H nd 

of the recent year, had a Christmas present of the city 
agency ol the Common ial Union Assurance Co., of Lai 
with its capital of over twelve millions and iis splendid 
prestige. 

The latest recruit in journalistic circles is Mr. Berl 

Spring, who has just been appointed sporting editor of the 
Report, although only fifteen years of age. He is a son of 
Mr. E. s. Spring, who has for years pasl been co scted 

with the same paper. 

"The President to 'sass' England." What a digni- 
fied remark for a Rabbi to make I He must surely have 
thought of his Vaterland's favorite delicacies ('.'). sassages 
and lager beer. 

Cream of Orange Blossoms, orefttes spotless complexions. 60 cents, 
druggists or by mall. Pacific Perfumery Company, San Franeisin. 



Cooper & Co., artstatloners and heraldic engravers, 746 Market St. S.P 

Best <► 

Bottled 
Brown Stout ^ 




and 

India Pale 
Ale. 



HAZELTON 
HEMME & LONG 
BROWN & SIMPSON 



735 Market St. 



PIANOS 



Placos to Rent and sold on Installmets. 



J. fl. W. Lundborg, Dentist, 

WHt POST STREET, Rooms 2-3. (Opposite Union Square 
Tclepnone 2275. San Francisco. 

Dr. F. C. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy or Sciences Building, 



819 Market street 



Q)R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

409V4 Post St., San Francisco. 



Dentist. 




The modern oxygen cure for 
disease. 

Watson & Co. 



Pacific Coast Agents : 

124 MARKET ST. 
Send for circulars. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January *8, 1896. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave. | From November 20, 1895. I Arrive 

6:30 A Haywards, Niles, and Way Sta- 
tions ID: 15 A 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East k:4d p 
7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Bedding, via Davis 7:1a P 
7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Cal- 

istoga, and Santa Rosa 6:15p 

8:30a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red 
BlulT, Sundays excepted Oroville 4:15 p 

*8:30a Peters and Milton *7:15p 

9 :00 a San Leandro Haywards and Way 

Stations . . 1 1 :45 A 

9:00a Los Angeles Express, Raymond, 
(for Yosemite), Santa Barbara, 

and Los Angeles 4 :4S p 

9 :00 A Martinez and Stockton 10 :45 A 

10 :00 a San Leandro, Haywards, Niles. . . 1 :45 p 
12:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 2:45P 

1:00 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore... 8:45 a 

*1:00p Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

fl :30 P Port Costa and Way Stations .... f7 :46 p 
3:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5:4a P 

4 :'i0 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 6:45 P 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9 :15 A 

4 :00p Benicia, Esparto, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 

Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45 a 

4:30p Niles, San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7:15P 

5:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8:45p 

3:30p New Orleans Express, Fresno, 
BakersBeld, Santa Barbara, Los 
Angeles, Deming. El Paso, New 

Orleans, and East 10:45 a 

3:30 p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 10:45a 

6 :00 p European mail, Ogden and East . . 9 :45 A 
6:00 P Haywards, Niles and San Jose... 7:45 a 

J7:00P Vallejo fT:45p 

7:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East. 10:45 a 

7 :00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10 :50 P 

9 :00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations ffl2:0QA 

H10:05p "Sunset Limited," Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans 

and East 1 12 :45 p 

ttll:15p San Leandro, Haywards and 
Way Stations 7 : 15 A 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:15A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Fc Ui .HoulderCreek, SantaCruz 
and way stations 5:50 P 

•3:15 P Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *ll :20A 

4 :15 P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9 :50 a 

til :45 P Hunters' Excursion. San Jose and 

Way Stations 1? :2t> p 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:45 A San Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only 1 :45 P 

8:15 A San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe and prin- 
cipal way stations 7:05 P 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 5:00 P 

11:45 a Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

•2:30 p San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10:40 A 

*3:30pSan Jose and principal way sta- 
tions 9 :47 A 

*4 :30 P San Jose and Way Stations *8 :06 A 

5:30 P San Jose and way stations *8:48a 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:35 a 

til :45p San Jose and way stations f?:45P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco — Foot of Market street 
(Slip 8). 

♦7:15.9:00, and 11:00 a. m., 11:00, ♦2:00, 13:00, 
♦4:00, J5:00 and ♦6:00 p. m. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway. 

♦6:00,8:00, 10:00 A. M.; 112:00, *1 :0T1. J2:00, 
♦3:00,14:00 *5:O0p. M. 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

tSundays only. ^Tuesdays and Saturdays. 

tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

jSSucdays and Thursdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



THE APE AND THE THINKER. 
Owen Wister in Mooda. 

Revolving deeply as he went 

The controversy of Descent, 

A Thinker chanced upon an Ape, 

And after sundry meditations 

Engendered bv the creature's shape, 

Exclaimed: "There's surely something in it! 

This is no theory of the minute. 

And you and I must be relations." 

The tuonkev closed one weary lid. 

And "Nay." he muttered, " God forbid!" 

"What!" cried the man, "you with your tail 

So humble in the social scale. 

Say this? Mv friend, have you reflected 

How good 'tis to be well connected? 

Or else, if this world you despise, 

And on the next one fix your eyes, 

In such case, what are you to hope for? 

For if the Scriptures are correct, 

Life here is all you can expect. 

Your good deeds by no angel hoarded, 

You die forever unrewarded. 

If Darwin's right, the soul I grope for 

Is in some measure shared by you. 

And thus we twain walk hand in hand 

Joint tenants of the Promised Land." 

"I firmly trust that is not true," 
Replied the melancholy beast; 
"I've come to know this world at least, 
And something also of your race ; 
And where among I have discerned 
One human heart that sometimes burned 
In pity for a brother's woe. 
One man, confronted face to face 
With troubles other than his own, 
Who found the time to pause and spend 
Some costly moments for a friend 
Not deep, sad *yes devised for show, 
Not easy sympathy, well told, 
Not chilly gift or naked gold ; 
Hut moments he might ne'er regain. 
Yet squandered them in cheerfulness 
To heal some heart, to ease some moan ; 
For one, I say, to whom distress 
Spoke and he turned, I have found ten 
That marked the human cry of pain 
And looked, but never looked again. 
Cold selfishness conies not in Heaven ; 
S >oner are hot sins there forgiven. 
Therefore," (he Ape said, "on-the whole 
1 hope we monkeys have no soul, 
For, mark me, we could never live 
Happy with your alternative; 
You with yoursouls may win salvation, 
But soulless Apes have no damnation." 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through line to New York, via Panama, call- 
ing at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. Sailing at noon from company's 
wharf, First and Brannan streets. 

No cargo leceived on board on day of sailing. 

S. S. " Panama," January 18. 1896. 
S. S. "City of Sydney, 1 .' January 8 \, 1896. 
S. S. "San Bias," January 28, 1896 
S. S. "San Juan," February 8, 1896. 

Japan and China Link for Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc. 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

S. S. "Peru," January 18, 1896. 
S. S. "City of Riode Janeiro," Feb. 6, 1896. 
S. S. "City of Peking," via Honolulu, Febru- 
ary £6, 1886. 
S. S. "China," March 14, 1896. 

Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the Company's 
office, No. 425 Marltet street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER. 

General Agent. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 
For Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

Coptic (via Honolulu)... Tuesday. Jau. 88, 1896 
Qabt.ic Saturday. February 15, 1896 

DOBIC Thursday, March 5, 1896 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 4:15 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STU BBS, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20, 11:00 A m; 12:15,3:30 
5:10, 6:30 p m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra tripe at 1:50 
and ii :30p m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00 a m; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
6:20 p M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 A U\ 18:45, 

3:40. 5:10 pm. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:55 

and 6:35 P m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 

6:25 P M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 1 In Effect 


Arrive 


INS. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays^ DESTI , TION 


Sundays. 


Week 
Days. 


7 :40 A M 
3:30 PM 
5:10 PM 


8:00am 
9:30 am 
5:00 pm 


Nov at o, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10 :40 a m 

6-05 PM 
7:30 pm 


8:50am 
10 :30am 
6:15pm 






Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville, 

Cloverdale. 




















3 :30 p m 


8:00am 


7:30pm 


6:15PM 



I Pieta, Hop- I 

lland, Ukiah.l 



7:40a Ml 
3:30 pm 



8:00 am Guerneville 7:30 pm 



1 10 30am 
|6: J5FM 



7:40 AMI 8:00am 
5:10PM| 5:00PM 



Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 



10:40am |8:50am 
6:05pm 6:15pm 



7-.40AMI 8:00am 
3:30 PM| 5:00PM 



Sebastopol. 



lU:4ii am 1 1(1. 30am 
| 6:05PM J6:I5pm 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Saratoga Springs, 
Upper Lake, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Usal, 
Westport, Laytonville, Willi tts, Capella, Porno, 
Potter Valley, John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly 
Valley, Harris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 



TICKET OFFICE-650 Market St., 
Building. 



H. C. WHITING, 
Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m.; Jan. 15, 30. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, Jan. 5,10, 
15. 20, 25, 30, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bav), Steamer "Pom- 
ona," at 2 p.m. Jan. 2. 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30 and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a.m. Jan. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Jan. 2, 6, 10, 14 18, 22, 26, 30, 
and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. m. 

For Ensenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz. Altata, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley." 10 a.m., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-fields, 
(Freemantle) Australia, 
$220 first class, $110 steer- 
age. Lowest rates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 

For HONOLULU, S. S- 
"AUSTRALIA." 
Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 10 am. 
For HONOLULU. APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S MARIPOSA, 
Feb. 6th, 1896, at 2 p. m. 

REDUCED SPECIAL RATES for parties Feb. 
6th and I5th, 1886. 

For passage apply to 114 Montgomery street. 

For freight apply to 327 Market street. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 





I 



/w 



Annual Suhtcriylion, H.OO. 




**» FRAHCU eo 







Vol. 111. 



SAN FRA SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1806. 



Number 4. 



MMarfMNiMrnn - 
tot-tct-tu '! 

T»t ofet of f»' .VA"M S LFr i 

b4 o' 



r^^.^^. propri.tor. fl;h 7' KASB10TT, 
1 

for* lily it ill />!/., 

I rtttbtff raff*. 



IN the circus line there is nothing on the road equal in 
pleasing moral interest to Dr. Brown and Mattie Over- 
man in one ring under one tent. Air for t lie band: "There 
thers." 

IF actresses didn't wear tights, and there were no dime 
museum freaks, and no social scandals, it appalls to 
think what would become of those great engines of moral- 
ity and civilization, the Sunday newspapers. 

IP there is any nation not yet heard from that wants a 
fight with the United States let it speak up, and the 
muzzle of Congress will be turned upon it. We can blow 
the earth out of the water with compressed air. 

GOVERNOR Budd cannot be accused of using stilted 
language in the discharge of his official functions. It 
is related that at a meeting of the State Board of 
Examiners, the other day, he explained how the Los 
Angeles Board of Trade had opposed his bill to create a 
new Board of Examiners. But, he declared, "I've got 
'em in the door now, and I'll pinch 'em till they squeal." 
The Governor does not propose to allow any monkeying 
with his prerogative — not to say perquisites. It's a Jim 
Budd and don't-you-forget-it administration, and those who 
do not stand in are fired out. 



THE anti-lynching bill that has passed the House of 
Representatives of South Carolina seems worthy of 
adoption by all the States where a -tendency to lynch-law 
exists. This measure provides that the county in which a 
lynching occurs shall be liable to a penalty of $2,000. to be 
recovered in a competent court by the legal representa- 
tives of the person lynched. This would be a just law, and 
its enforcement would go far to check an evil that dis- 
graces many American States. When taxpayers find 
themselves liable in damages for every outrage of this 
character, lynch-law will soon become unpopular. 

IF the gossips are to be believed, ex-President Harrison 
is not such an iceberg as he has been represented, aud 
the White House narrowly escaped a scandal during his 
administration. But yet it is not to be supposed that the 
less glacial side of his nature was affected in other than a 
purely platonic way. All that was necessary to stir the 
depths of the General's consciousness was a feminine dis- 
covery of his greatness, coupled with a profound faith in 
his destiny as a foreordained "ruler" of the American 
people for a second term. He has a calm, serene confid- 
ence in his own intellectual eminence, and naturally con- 
fides in those who worship him. 

THE announcement that, at the call of Mr. Hearst, our 
only Ambrose Bierce had departed for Washington, 
to direct national legislation on the Pacific railroads' debt, 
seems to have created no commotion in the great East. 
It is possible that President Huntington may have 
trembled in his shoes, but if so, no responsive quiver has 
been felt along the line of the Central Pacific in California. 
Only the Examiner appears to have taken the matter 
seriously. Now if brother Sutro would but pack his terri- 
ble grip, and likewise depart for the national capital, the 
elements of a grand opera bouffe combination at Washing- 
ton would be almost complete. 



THK average San Franciscan, each morning as he 
opens his newspaper and sees the serried columns of 
type devoted to theological controversy, offers up 
bumble thanks to God that, not being a Christian, he Is 
under no obligation bo read what the clergy are writ 



GOVERNOR Budd has cabled President Eruger beg- 
lim. presumably. no1 to hang .lack Hammond. 
The reply at the stern old Boer has not yel been received. 

and the worst fears are entertained. It ought to be pos- 
sible t" come to terms. Let the Governor offer to i 
change General Dick for his brother, and California will 
uphold him. It is a dread alternative, but this people is 
willing to make sacrifices. 



THE Rev. Father Yorke is a very clever controversial- 
ist, and tumbles his opponents over without trouble, 
but when the war of words shall have ended it is not 
likely that there will be more Catholics than when it began. 
In the meantime two facts obtrude themselves with dis- 
tinctness. One is that San Francisco is made to seem to 
be in a mediaeval condition intellectually, and the other is 
that Father Yorke, good man, is not one of the meek and 
lowly, but even as the worldly, being full of belligerence 
and damns. Wherefor Father Yorke is a stumbling block- 
that should be blown up by his Bishop in the interest of 
peace and the progress of the faith. 



THE appointment of Austin as poet laureate is quite a 
compliment to Lord Salisbury. A practical states- 
man is supposed to be unusually free from the poetic senti- 
ment, for the possession of such sentiment would have pre- 
vented Salisbury from occupying the high position he does. 
His selection, therefore, of Mr. Austin, instead of shaking 
mankind's faith in his judgment, should strengthen the 
.people's confidence in his ability as a statesman. Had he 
been given as much to poetry as to prose, William Watson, 
the laureate by virtue of merit, would have moved him to 
recite a bit of modern verse to the Sultan by mouth of 
England's cannon. True, from the muse's point of view it 
would be pleasanter to have a competent judge of poetry to 
select successors to Tennysons; for not every man who 
looks like a fool is a poet. Leaving the delicate task to 
statesmen, Shakespeare and the author of the "Mother 
Goose Rhymes" stand about an equal show for court 
favors. 

IT is pleasant in these times, when religious exer- 
cises seem to lack participants, to know that 
the representatives of the great American people, 
in Congress assembled, are thoroughly in sympathy 
with prayer, and know how to comport themselves 
when their mouthpiece, the chaplain of the House, is 
addressing the Throne of Grace. It is the custom with 
over-ardent followers of the Lord to join loudly in prayerful 
amens to all properly expressed petitions. The other day 
the chaplain told the Lord about what the American 
people wished, and gave him information of what the rebels 
are doing in Cuba to overthrow the myrmidons of Spain, and 
closed his morning prayer with the hope that the Almighty 
would see things as the jingoes do, and help along the 
cause of republicanism versus monarchism. The House 
listened in breathless sympathy, and, as soon as they could 
get their work in, instead of uttering mild amens, multi- 
tudinously burst into a loud applause. This is a new fad 
in religious worship, but, as long as the Lord understands 
it, it is probably quite right. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 



PERILOUS BLUFFING. 



ftFEW words of calm good sense from Washington come 
like a whiff of cool air on a hot day. While so many 
members of Congress are vying with their neighbors in 
chewing gunpowder and exploding the bombs of warlike 
speech under the thrones of the effete despots of Europe, 
Senator Cullom gently remarks, in effect, that this nation 
is making a fool of itself. "The fact of the matter is," he 
says, " that we are not prepared for war with anybody, 
and the sooner Congress understands this and gets down 
to business the better. We cannot afford to provoke quar- 
rels until we put ourselves in a position to defend ourselves 
if attacked." The indignation sure to be excited by lan- 
guage such as this from a Senator of the United States 
will be great. But it will be mild in comparison with the 
patriotic fury evoked by his further observation : 

'• We have imagined that no one was going (o tight U3, and that 
we were protected by our situation from the necessity of preparing 
for a conflict, but if a British flying squadron should suddenly make 
its appearance on our shores our attention would be called down to 
business." 

Indeed it would. And if in addition to a British flying 
squadron the combined fleets of Europe should descend 
upon us, what should we do ? That calamity is far from 
being an impossible one. We have entered upon a national 
policy that, if pursued, will inevitably result in a world 
wide coalition agaiust us. If we shall stand by the position 
we have assumed— that the United States is the supreme 
dictator of the Western hemisphere, the other nations 
thereof being our wards— we shall in all probability soon 
be called on to make our claim good with the sword. 

The protagonists of the new extension of the Monroe 
doctrine may be right or wrong, but in either case they 
will not be permitted to enforce the doctrine with words. 
They have radically altered our relations with the powers. 
Hitherto we have avoided quarrel with them, and grown 
great in population and wealth by practicing the arts and 
adhering to the maxims of peace. But now that we have 
determined to assert practical proprietorship to half the 
world the character of the republic must change. Only by 
force can we induce Europe to accept us in this imperial 
r6le. It will not do to trust to luck and the hope that our 
pretensions will not provoke armed protest. 

The United States has long been the spoiled child in the 
family of nations. Without an army and only with the be- 
ginning of a navy, we have been dangerous merely in the 
possibilities inherent in the number of our people and out- 
opulence. Moreover, we have not interfered with Euro- 
pean policies, greed, and ambitions. Wehavebeen on one 
side, as it were, and as our occasional threats and con- 
stant vauntings have injuriously affected no foreign inter- 
ests, a good-natured tolerance has been shown us — a tol- 
erance which has had amusement and some contempt in 
it. Our unwarlike state, so truly described by Senator 
Cullom, has been our best protection, for a nation that is 
not ready to fight is not regarded as being in earnest 
when it talks fight. Yet we have got it into our modest 
heads that the world is afraid of us. 

The world would have reason to be afraid were the 
United States to stop talking of its illimitable resources 
and go earnestly to work applying some of those resources 
to the construction of a mighty navy and the organization 
of a first-class army — if we should fortify our coasts and in 
all ways model ourselves upon the nations on the other 
side of the Atlantic which go armed to the teeth. And un- 
til we do that we shall not be justified in taking the tone 
sounded by the President's Venezuela message and echoed 
by Congress and the press. 

We have, of course, the men and money wherewith to 
fight magnificently — if that money had only been applied 
and the men organized. But suppose England were to- 
morrow to become as bloodthirsty as Congress seems to be 
and should declare war. where would we be? And if other 
powers should join her in armed opposition to the new 
Monroe doctrine, what would be our plight'.' Those who 
live in sea coa, ' cities bave special reasons for doing some 
thinking on this b 

England is becomin 'ated. The London Globe 

tells the United States Senate that "the English people 
will not stand much v fooling from anybody,'' and 



warns us that we may easily find ourselves "face to face 
with a situation that could be called appalling." 

The sum of the matter is that if the United States 
means to fight it should drop oratory and get ready for 
fighting. Of bluffing we have already had more than 
enough for our safety and dignity. 



A South African The indignation of the American press 
Eye-Opener, at the popularity of Dr. Jameson in 
England is a proof of how easy it is to 
be virtuous when there is no temptation to be otherwise. 
What! Make a hero of a villain who raided the peaceable and 
unoffending Boers? The column rules of our newspapers 
trembled with just anger at such moral turpitude in the 
British. What Dr. Jameson deserved was a rope and a 
tree in the Trausvaal. Any interference on the part of 
the English Government to save him from that, or what- 
ever fate the Boers might see fit to inflict, would be in- 
famous. 

But it develops that there were some Americans in that 
far country who were involved in Jameson's enterprise, 
and that they have been thrown into prison. The Boer 
horn is in the side of our ox. So Oom Paul is bombarded 
with telegrams, and the English Government has been re- 
quested by our own to use its good offices in behalf of the 
infamous Jameson's American confederates. 

Let us hope that President Kruger is as sensible and 
patient a man as he has been pictured, and that the 
courts of his republic are as just as their repute, for we 
Americans have been guilty of an enormous impertinence 
in our clamors regarding our imperiled countrymen. We 
have not inquired if they are guilty, we have not assumed 
that they will be fairly dealt with; we have simply rushed 
forward and asked for their rescue, as if they had fallen 
into the hands of savages and were necessarily blameless. 
What we have pleaded for, practically, is that Americans 
in the Transvaal shall not be held responsible for their acts 
or required to suffer the penalty of the law of the country 
if they have offended against it. What would we think of 
President Kruger if he should claim a like immunity for 
the citizens of his republic were any of them to come over 
here and commit crimes against the Government of the 
United States? 

We have a right to demand that American citizens in 
the Transvaal, and everywhere else, shall equally with 
other men be treated justly under the laws there obtain- 
ing, but more than that we have no right to ask. Amer- 
ican citizenship is not, as seems to be thought in some 
quarters, a license to a' man to rove about the world do- 
ing as he pleases, regardless of foreign laws and customs. 
It is natural that we should be sympathetically concerned 
when men whom we know and respect get into trouble in 
distant lands — just as natural as that the English should 
admire Jameson for his lawless courage and audacity — but 
none the less we must place our common sense above our 
sympathetic emotions, and bring ourselves to understand 
that we are not warranted in requesting the nations of 
the globe to suspend the operation of their laws for the 
benefit of sojourning Americans. Those who have fallen 
afoul of Boer statutes are, with Dr. Jameson, entitled to a 
fair trial, and that is all. 

Church One Dr. Brown does the churches more harm 

Morals, than many Ingersolls. It is unfortunate for the 
churches that when a Dr. Brown appears they 
make the worst possible use of him. Instead of being 
eager to bring him to full exposure and justice, they obey 
a mindless instinct of self-preservation, and seek to pro- 
tect him, as if his cause were their own. Thus are the 
churches browned all over by the fire that should roast 
only the clerical delinquent. 

The public has long ago made up its mind as to Dr. 
Brown on the evidence presented by the press, yet the 
authorities of his sect have got no further thau to pray 
for his speedy restoration to health, and to consult him as 
to how he shall be tried. Meantime, Dr. Brown has Miss 
Mattie Overman beneath his roof, carefully guarded from 
reporters, and, doubtless, the good man spares some time 
from the preparation of his own judiciously tardy state- 
ment to the brethren in order to assist her in preparing 
hers. 

The fact that the writer of the Tunnell letters is in Dr. 



January 25, 1896. 



SAN IK vxcisco m:\vs 



Brow ■ 

• 

'.raw win 
a man comine; ..t his 

own, unci dk 

mind S any of the minis 

u- Mr. Brown's judges to infer 
anything from Miss Matl to her i~ 

■-. which to tin- worldly presents itsrlf as a p 
effrontery so magn;: excite their awe ami won 

tanong the brethren, indeed, there is evident a pro- 
found sympathy with their afflicted colleague. They pray 
for him as one who is going through the iiery furna 
persecution. The gri I may give a peace thai 

'h all understanding, but it also frequently deprives 
the human mind ol capacity for thinking. There is Brother 
Pond — the Rev. Pond — for example, who. though he is to 
sit in judgment, gives it out that he believes Brother 
Brown is all right because Brother Brown has asked for a 
trial. To the powerful intellect of Brother Pond it is clear 
that Brother Brown would not do that unless he were 
innocent. 

In itself, the circumstance that a clergyman now and 
again is discovered to be a scoundrel would do religion no 
harm if the churches acted rationally. Obviously, theirs 
is the greatest interest in getting rid of him, and sending 
him forth placarded as a traitor. But because they halt 
and shuffle, and shield and excuse, they awaken the scorn 
and aversion of straight-thinking people who, though not 
of the household of faith, are decent and intelligent. It 
cannot be but that the First Congregational Church, and 
the other churches, through it, will be hurt by this Brown 
scandal, for the delay in action has made it seem that pub- 
lic opinion has forced reluctant proceedings. Thus will be 
confirmed the worldly impression that the partisanship of 
piety too often blinds the moral perceptions of God's people, 
and so renders them worse instead of better than folk who 
have not had the light of the Gospel shed abroad in their 
hearts, but who retain unimpaired their natural ability to 
discriminate between right and wrong. When a man of 
the kind that Dr. Brown has been proved to be is not 
avoided like a leper and cast forth by his congregation, 
how can modest women or honest men regard the church 
which he has defiled as a place clean enough for themselves 
and their children ? And how can such men and women be 
persuaded that religion confers a higher moral standard, 
a superior sensitiveness of soul ? 

The churches of San Francisco are suffering, and will 
continue to suffer, vicarious atonement for the sins of Dr. 
Brown. And it will serve them right for not having 
crucified him the instant he was found out. 

The Commission Americans are to be congratulated up- 
Has on the manner in which the Venezuela 

Begun Well. Commission has proceeded with its 
duties. The letter of its President, 
Justice Brewer, to Secretary Olney, suggesting the ap- 
pointment of agents or attorneys by England and 
Venezuela, to represent the rival claims before the Com- 
mission, is admirable in the tact and courtesy it displays. 
It opens the way for a graceful acknowledgment by Eng- 
land of the invitation thus extended, and yet acquiescence 
in the request will not in any way bind either party to the 
dispute to recognize the correctness of the conclusions 
reached by the Commission. The moral effect of the in- 
quiry, conducted in the manner proposed, must, however, 
be very great. Should England and Venezuela both be 
officially represented before the Commission and each side 
thus have full opportunity to be heard, the judgment of 
such a body will have great weight with the world at large. 
It will certainly be conclusive, so far as American opinion 
is concerned. Should it decide against the British claim, 
there appears to be no escape from the conclusion that our 
Government must be prepared to back up the findings, 
even though the result would inevitably be war with Eng- 
land. President Cleveland and Congress have gone too 
far in the matter to recede. An adverse decision, like- 
wise, would put Great Britain in an exceedingly awkward 
position. While in no way bound to recognize the Com- 
mission, and in fact denying even the right of the United 



Lh the m. .si far 

in the meantime, define the 

... those 1 n the 

ator Davis, England must promptly back 

down or tight The D arllier than anv 

previous attempt t,. law down thi in 

arbitrary lines. While reaffirming this nation;; 

expr I by President Monroe in 1823. it adds to it an 

i.t of the greatest uncertainty, What was before in 
no way obscure would by the resolution of Senator Davis 
lie left altogether indefinite. It does nol specifically de- 
fine the cases to which the Monroe doctrine would aj> ply. 
but virtually makes any given act of a foreign power, with 
relation to territory on this hemisphere, Subject 
approval of the I nited States. It would be a dangerous 

tion to adopt, for. whatever may be thought of the 
inherent rights of this country in the premises, it is to be 
remembered that the nation should not commit itself to a 
declaration that it is not prepared at all times to enforce 
against any and all foreign powers. The "war spirit ' at 
Washington just now is like new wine working in an old 
leathern bottle— it threatens a rupture disastrous to all 
concerned. 

The Detective It would be agreeable for the tax-payers 
Conscience. to find out about when it was determined 
that a detective policeman is to be paid 
his salary simply for the honor he confers on the city by 
filling the office, and that he is not to do any work as a 
detective until he is bought to do it by a direct offer of 
money or the chance of getting a reward offered by the 
State. It was a pretty spectacle offered citizens when 
Lees went before the State Board of Examiners in Sacra- 
mento to not only keep those who furnished evidence to 
convict Kovalev, from getting the reward of $1,000 offered 
by the State, but to claim it all for himself. Lees was 
simply a policeman hired to do his duty — that is, to go and 
find the scoundrel through information furnished by several 
others. These several others brought the information. 
He used it. The man was arrested, tried, and convicted 
by means of that information. Now Lees, in the language 
of the people, wants to "hog" it all, and leave the poor 
fellows, without whose aid the detective could have done 
nothing, to suck their thumbs on the outside, and admire 
the sagacity of the great detective in ferreting out the 
criminal and pocketing the spoils. To give Lees a cent of 
this would be simply to encourage a sluggard officer in 
doing nothing to earn his salary. It would, moreover, 
break the word of promise given by the State. It would 
make vain any future offers of reward, if the policemrn 
who joins the pieces of information together is to take the 
gain from those who give the information. The fact that 
such a claim, is set up is proof that a detective's conscience 
is a thing unknown. To grant him the reward will stultify 
the State, corrupt the detective force, and paralyze the 
action of all outsiders whose services are alone of any value 
to the people. Instead of allowing Lees any of the reward, 
there should be a fair distribution of it among those whose 
services were efficient, and the next Legislature should 
pass a law forbidding, under penalty, the receipt by any 
policeman of any compensation for doing the duties of his 
office, other than the salary received from the Govern- 
ment that employs him. 

A New Fuel The adoption of petroleum for fuel in the 

And What Pacific Rolling Mills is an important 

It Suggests, change in local manufacturing industries, 

and is likely to prove the first step in a 

general new departure. It is estimated that these works 

alone will consume about one hundred thousand barrels of 

oil yearly. The late developments in the production of 

petroleum in Southern California are thus bearing good 

fruit in this quarter. The high cost of fuel has hitherto 

been a serious drawback to manufacturing in San 

Francisco, but with an abundant supply of a cheap and 

highly concentrated fuel, such as petroleum, to draw upon, 

increased prosperity and activity in this field of enterprise 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 



may now be expected. While Los Angeles is finding here 
a good market for oil, it is an example of the natural 
reciprocity of trade that this same fuel is being used at 
our rolling mills for the production of iron-work on two 
large contracts from the southern city, resulting from the 
construction of a fire-proof building and a street rail- 
way viaduct. The progress of Los Angeles has of late 
years furnished much employment to labor here, in similar 
ways, and the fact indicates that, directly and indirectly, 
this city is benefited by the growth of other communities 
in California. Their expansion naturally brings to us con- 
struction and other work which may be done here more 
economically than elsewhere, because of certain advant- 
ages and facilities flowing from San Francisco's location, 
large population and established manufactories, partic- 
ularly those of iron and steel and others requiring large 
capital and costly machinery. Our merchants and manu- 
facturers should be taking heart from these circumstances, 
and making a more diligent canvass of the tributary terri- 
tory for advantageous connections. It is a false idea that 
the growth of Los Angeles, or of any other center of local 
trade in this State, is necessarily detrimental to this city. 
Whether loss or benefit results to San Francisco depends 
upon what our people may do with the opportunities 
afforded them. If they are content to fold their hands, 
rely on natural advantages, and wait for something to turn 
up in the way of new trade and industry, they are certain 
to find themselves left far behind in the race of progress. 
In the competition for new business that is bringing Chicago 
and St. Louis more and more into direct rivalry with San 
Francisco for the trade of the Pacific Coast, our merchants 
and manufacturers are obliged to keep their eyes open, 
and to follow the brisk methods of their Eastern com- 
petitors, or else drop farther and farther behind. If a 
little of the petroleum of enterprise were ignited under all 
the easy chairs on Front, Battery and Sansome streets, 
the result might be a glow of healthful activity, a stir of 
new life, all along the line. 

Deportment The dignity of the bench and the bar is a con- 
of siderable part of the due administration of 

the Bar. the law. In older communities it exists as 
something for citizens to take pride in. 
In later ones there is often enough such a plentiful 
lack of it, that the observer may be a little in doubt whether 
he is in a court of justice, a primary ward meeting, or a 
circus. Mr. Charles Wesley Reid, who is permitted to be 
called a lawyer, may know how to address a popular 
gathering called to denounce the awful immorality of the ! 
pool-r-oom, but, when he gets before a judge, his attitude is 
something for clowns to stare at, but not to imitate.' His 
massive brain, doubtless, makes him a bit top-heavy, so he 
balances himself imperfectly till he can get a table to lean 
against, until, as his interrogatories to the witness exhaust 
his strength, he finally flops down upon the table, pulls one 
leg under him, and, from this improvised eminence, con- 
tinues the practice of the law. It may be his Honor, j 
Judge Hebbard, is indifferent to the deportment of the 
bar, but, if lawyers are allowed to pose thus in all the 
court rooms without censure, both judges and lawyers 
may forever cease to wonder if laymen lose a decent 
respect for the administrators of the law, and show by 
their attitudes that they can better the instruction. 



Ships That It is said that any one of England's first- 
Pass class battle ships could send to the bottom 

In a Decade, in a few minutes a dozen of what were 
considered her best war vessels eleven 
years ago. This is because of the tremendous power of 
the big guns that have come into use, as well as the great 
improvements in armor. What was regarded as impreg- 
nable in 1886 is now easily pierced by rifled guns. But 
this remarkable advance, in the course of ten or a "dozen 
years, naturally excites the inquiry as to what will be the 
value of the present war ships ten or twelve years from 
now. Is it not probable that they, too, will be "considered 
obsolete, as are at this time the naval invinoibles of an 
earlier date? The nation that undertakes to maintain the 
strongest navy is saddled with an enormous outlay, which 
must be steadily increased to keep pace with the" rapidly 



advancing cost of armor and armament. This is Eng- 
land's present position, but receut events have demon- 
strated that her naval policy is wise, however expensive 
and burdensome to the British taxpayer. Her superior 
naval strength fairly cowed the truculent young German 
Emperor, who, in the face of England's preparations for 
war, dared not maintain the defiant and insulting attitude 
he had assumed in the South African matter. Now he is 
making himself ridiculous by a demand for a big German 
navy, to be composed of wooden ships. Such vessels 
might gratify by their numbers and show of strength the 
egregious vanity of the young "war lord," but would of 
course be worthless for fighting purposes. In the present 
state of naval development, it seems clear that a few 
battle ships of the first class are of infinitely more value to 
any nation, for actual fighting purposes, than any number 
of inferior vessels, alike vulnerable and feeble in arma- 
ment. The policy of the United States should be to waste 
no money on the construction of weak ships, in the foolish 
notion that there is safety in mere numbers. What we 
seem to most need is a big fleet of torpedo boats, and a 
liberal equipment of torpedoes for all our seaports. If the 
late excitement over Venezuela taught any lesson at all, 
it was that of proceeding at once for the thorough defence 
of our coasts and harbors. The present Congress should 
make an appropriation large enough to enable the War 
and Navy Departments to proceed immediately with the 
plans that have been adopted for the proper defence of our 
shores. The people do not desire a big navy for aggres- 
sive display in foreign waters, but they are practically 
united in support of a thorough provision for coast defence. 
The folly of relying on "reserve powers," our "unbounded 
resources," and other nonsense of the same character, is 
speedily dissipated when a prospect of war arises with 
some foreign power possessing a formidable navy. 



Pull Together Warner Miller, President of the 
For The Nicaragua Canal Construction Company, 

Needed Canal, is quoted assaying that if Congress does 
not, at its present session, take decisive 
action towards the building and control of the Nicaragua 
canal by the United States Government, the company will 
proceed to seek European capital for its construction. 
This may be regarded as in the nature of what is com- 
monly called a bluff. Miller well knows that European 
capital cannot be had for the undertaking, under present 
conditions. If the canal is to be built at all, it must be 
done by our Government, or with its express consent or 
cooperation. The chief obstacle of late years has been the 
demand of the existing company for a certain share of 
ownership in the Government work, because of the con- 
cessions held by the corporation and on account of the out- 
lay it made in Nicaragua some time ago. The time has come 
for Congress to deal energetically and earnestly with this 
subject. The canal is a great national want, and of 
enormous importance to the Pacific coast. There is 
nothing in which the people of California are or should be 
more interested, for it would mean to them a vastly greater 
demand for their products, with resulting benefits to all 
interests in the State. Through the new water-way direct 
shipments of fruits, vegetables and other products of the 
soil could be made by steamships to the Atlantic ports of 
the United States as well as to Europe. A multitude of 
new markets would be at once opened, and trade with 
foreign countries would quickly spring into enormous pro- 
portions. San Francisco, by means of the canal, would 
begin to realize her destiny as the chief port of the Pacific, 
and the future of the whole coast would appear brightened 
and secure. If our people could be aroused to a sense of 
the overwhelming importance of this canal, and to take 
the united and earnest action that the subject demands, it 
might be possible to urge Congress into effective legisla- 
tion during the present sessiou. But, as usual, the atten- 
tion of our public is distracted by things of comparatively 
small concern. As a matter of fact, there has been more 
effort in California this winter to secure an appropriation 
for the opening of navigation between Red Bluff and Red- 
ding, on the upper Sacramento river, than to bring about 
the construction by the Government of the sorely needed 
canal from ocean to ocean. 



Jam:..- 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS I.KTTKR. 



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BSppP* 









ftI.T. through the past week Sue had been oddly happy. 
Her little boy had not had a touch of that hateful 
croup for a long time, now; and Luke Gait, her husband, 
had got work at last. He had not drank a drop for three 
whole months, but the hard times, added to his known vice. 
had kept him from securing work. Everybody had seemed 
to remember that on three different occasions he had been 
discharged for drunkenness. In vain he declared that lie 
would never again touch liquor; in vain his handsome, 
healthful face gave support to this avowal. "You're an 
excellent workman; we know about you," one superinten- 
dent has kindly said. " You ought to have been a foreman, 
by this time. But there's no trusting you, I hear. You'll 
keep straight as a string for two, three, four months, and 
then your demon will grip you again. Besides, we're dis- 
charging hands, just now, anyway. So good-morning, 
Luke Gait; good-morning. 

Luke was proud, in bis way, and it cost him a keen pang 
to beg for work in the name of his starving wife and child. 
But he did beg for it in these terms, and at length he got 
it, too. Eleven dollars a week seemed a god-send now. 
Last year he would have laughed in the face of any one 
who had offered it to him. 

To-night was Saturday night, and by ten minutes past 
six o'clock Sue began to grow nervous. Always that 
horror was over her. Each tick of the big kitchen clock 
gave her a deeper stab. Willie, expecting his father, had 
been placed in his high-chair at the supper-table, near 
Luke's empty seat. He was a pale, flaxen-haired child, 
looking younger than his real age, which was barely five 
years. Sue worshipped him, and was always dreading 
the insidious croup, from which he had already suffered 
several fierce attacks, would one day snatch him from her 
jealous arms. 

His seizures had always come like lightning. The first 
had stricken him when Luke and she were far more pros- 
perous than now. A physician of great eminence had then 
given her a certain prescription, which she had ever since 
carefully guarded. "It will save him if anything does," 
the famous New York doctor had said; " but much will de- 
pend upon its being used very promptly." 

Sue looked at the clock, and then sought solely to busy 
herself with the sliced meat frying on the stove. Soon 
she sturdily dished the meat, and set it on the table, trying 
hard not to let her eyes wander toward the clock again, 
but hearing, somehow, that it was quarter past six, in 
spite of her piteous effort. 

She and Luke had only a bedroom and kitchen in this 
downtown tenement-house whither want had drifted them. 
She loathed the building and the street. Both were full of 
grimy Italians, with a sprinkling of Germans almost equally 
coarse. Luke's recent good fortune had thrilled her with 
a passionate hope that they might soon find themselves in 
cleaner and better quarters. He was to bring home his 
week's wages that night — ten blessed, helpful dollars. One 
dollar he had borrowed from a fellow- work man last Tues- 
day, and given it to bis wife. Sue had not a cent of it left. 

She went into the front bedroom, after putting the meat 
on the table and cutting a few pieces off the bread-loaf 
bought that afternoon with the very last of her money. 
All day the weather had been growing gustier and wilder. 
It had now roughened into a fierce January blizzard. The 
window-panes were so coated with frozen sleet that she 
could not see at all beyond them. The wind outside had 




FAVYCCTT.^ AW . ecK 

begun to shudder and scream. If he had been Bl home she 

would not have minded the aound. Now it pierced her 
dismally than those relent!. ii.-ks. 

One BUdden she hoard another BOUud, that made her 

start and turn. sin. had not heeded Willie for tl 
minutes. He was always a quiei child. Be bad (ranted 

to be put in his high-chair, and she had let him have his 
way. lb- had seemed, while she dished the meat, to be 
playing harmlessly enough with the knife and fork before 
him, grasping the handle of each in either pale little hand 
and strikii i nsl the other with listless clashes. 

In a trice Sue darted back to where he sat. His head 

had fallen sidewise; his face had gol ;i chalky tinge; from 

his throat came the muffled, stertorous rattle that she 
knew so well. 

She caught him in her arms and Hew back with him to 
the bedroom. She laid him on the bed, and then applied 
what immediate remedies she remembered. But these 
were not enough. The prescription! She hurried to a 
bureau drawer and found the bottle which had contained it 
when last made up. Not a drop was left! But the paper 
— she knew where to find that. With sli^at trouble she 
did find it. 

The only apothecary for many streets away was Zundorf, 
a German, notoriously gruff and unkind. Wraping a 
stout shawl over her head, Sue slipped downstairs, and 
out into the blinding whirls of snow. If any one passed her 
she did not know it, so low had she bent her shrouded 
head. 

Zundorf was a small man, with a crown bald as an 
apple and a stubble of tawny beai'd. He looked sceeringly 
at Sue from behind a pair of indigo glasses that did not let 
you see what color his eyes were, though in reality they 
had little reddish circles, like a rat's. 

No, he wouldn't make up any prescription without pay. 
This would cost a dollar, and he must see the dollar before 
he began on it. Dying child? Oh, yes. Too bad. But 
he had his living to make. It wasn't any good coaxing. 
He couldn't trade on promises; he'd been fooled so many 
times before that he'd shut down on all that kind of busi- 
ness now and forever. 

Sue saw there was no use. She caught the prescription 
from off the counter, thrust it into the bosom of her dress, 
and sped back again to her rooms. 

"Luke! You're home! Oh, Luke, I'm so glad! I was 
afraid — " 

Theu she drew back. He stood beside the bed where 
Willie lay. His right hand was raised, as if playfully, over 
the child. Her side-view of his face made her believe, at 
lirst, that only a loving smile lighted it. Then the ridges 
of rime on his coat, and a certain rearward totter that he 
gave, stung her with doubt. As he turned full upon her, 
she saw the leer, the sluggish flush, the bloodshot eyes 
. . . all was plain, then. 

But she thought only of the child. 

"Luke, tell me, tell me: Have you brought any money! 
Willie's sick; he awful sick. It's croup again." She 
shrilled more words into his face as he stood unsteadily 
swaying before her. 

"Money, Sue? " he mumbled. Then, though incoherently, 
he spoke some words whose meaning she gathered. He 
had brought home the ten dollars, all but a dollar or so. 
Certain acquaintances had led him off. He had taken only 
three or four drinks, but she knew how he never could 
stand anything as could most other men, and how his long 
sober term had made it harder still. 

She believed him; she knew he was telling her the truth. 
They had talked it all over so often, and she had scolded 
him'aud he had borue it meekly, for withal he loved her as 
dearly as she loved him, and he hated his vice with all the 
force of her own hatred. 

He stretched out his arms to her, and though she had 
many times recoiled from his tenderness when this curse 



-~" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 



was upon him, she let him gather her for an instant in his 
arms. 

" Oh, Luke," she pleaded, " give me the money! Where 
is it. I want it for Willie— I ..." 

But he dropped inertly on his knees before her. and then 
fell at full length on the 'floor beside the bed. 

She Huny herself, the next instant, across the mattress, 
and felt Willie's forehead, face, shoulders, chest with eager 
hands. He was quieter. It might mean coming death, 
but still he was quieter. Suddenly a shiver passed through 
the little frame. It stiffened in her arms, then relaxed 
again. The boy's breathing had the sound of air pumped 
into tiny resistent pipes. 

"A convulsion," flashed through her thoughts. "He 
may have had one before, while I was away." She snatched 
a kiss from the boy's clammy forehead; then she rose and 
bent above her prostrate husband. 

"Luke! Luke! " she moaned. "Where is the money ? 
I can get the prescription with it if you'll only give it to 
me. There's time yet! Luke! Luke!" 

While speaking she searched his pockets. She knew 
them all so well! She had sewed rents and darned holes 
in every garment he wore. Pockets of waistcoat, pockets 
of trousers, pockets of inside coat, pockets of drenched 
and icy overcoat — she searched them all. Not a sign of 
money — not a bill, not a dime, not a cent! 

"Luke! Luke! " she kept crying. "Wake up! Wake 
up, for God's sake! If 1 could only get the money you said 
you've brought!" 

Thick, guttural, drunken snores kept answering her. 
Again and again she searched. Mixed with Luke's snores 
came that pathetic, half-strangled wheeze from the bed. 

"I — I can't find it!" she gasped to herself, standing up- 
right. "Pie's lied to me." . . Then, even at this hour, 
a pang of self-reproach pierced her faithful breast. 

"No, no, no! He never yei lied to me! He ilitl bring it 
home — all but a dollar or so, just as he said." 

Perhaps the sharp, whipping sound of the bitter sleet 
against the windows of the next room gave her a certain 
new idea. She ran to one of these windows and tried with 
both upward-straining hands to open it. At first she 
failed, so tight was the sash frozen to the sill. Then, with 
a great, new strain, she made an aperture large enough 
for her to stretch both hands through it and scoop from 
the outer ledge a quantity of glistening sleet. With this 
she hurried to Luke. She pressed it upon his face and 
temples; she held it to his brow until she grew frightened 
and brushed it away on the wretched rag of a carpet that 
scarcely covered the bed-room floor. 

"Sue!" 

He lifted himself on one elbow. He stared full at her in 
the sallow lamplight. His look was sane and unwavering 
now, though still bloodshot. 

"Luke! Thank God, you're yourself again! I want the 
money — some money — any money! You said you'd brought 
some home. I want it for Willie. The druggist at the 
corner." . . . And so, in a pell-mell torrent the words 
were poured from her trembling lips. 

Luke got up on his feet before she had finished. He 
reeled a little at first and put one hand to his ice-cold 
head. 

"The— the money? I— I gave it to the boy, Sue. At 
least, I guess I did. It seems to me that I did. I came 
in. and you wasn't here. I- I looked down at the bed, and 
I seen him. I didn't know he was sick. P'raps I was too 
drunk to see it. I— I guess I'd made it all up into a kind 
of little wad, and I held it over him, thinkin' he'd catch it, 
as he does a cake, or a nut, or anything I bring him. I 
guess he did catch it, too. I thought you'd come, in a 
minute, and I'd tell you he had it there, 'in his little fist 
. . Sue' Sue! What's the matter? What are ye bend- 
in' over him for. like that? " 

She had gone round to the other side of the bed. In one 
tight-clinched hand Willie indeed clutched a " kind of tight 
little wad"— bills, with some silver coins enfolded by them 
This was the money that might have saved him i'f it had 
come in time. Rut ail the wealth of all the world could not 
save him now. 

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January 25, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTBR. 




■■»£< 



a Book of As an academic lecturer Professor S 

the has been at Cambridge. His lec- 

Week. * tures are full of ideas; they are suggestive, 

and, if not very eloquent, yet tiny are clear 

and attractive. But. to our mind, their chief interest lies 
in the fact that they deal with so many modem problems, 
and they place practical issues before us in a manner that 
cannot fail to command attention. It would be impossible 
for us in this brief review to follow these lectures in detail, 
and. as we must select two or three statements to dwell 
on. we first challenge what Professor Seeley says about 
"Greater Britain." that vast empire which, "with the 
motherland, is now attracting so much of the world's atten- 
tion. Dealing with this subject, then, Professor Seeley 
says that "Greater Britain is only the considerable 
survivor of a family of great empires which arose out of 
the contact of the Western States of Europe with the new- 
world, so suddenly laid open by Vasco de Gama and Colum- 
bus. What England did was done by Spain, Portugal, 
France, and Holland. There wasonce a 'Greater Spain,' a 
'Greater Portugal,' a 'Greater France,' and a 'Greater 
Holland,' as well as a 'Greater Britain'; but, from 
various causes, these four empires perished, or have become 
insignificant.'' Xow, let us see how the "Greater Britain" 
of to-day compares in population with the " Greater Em- 
pires" of other lands. It is true "Greater France" 
passed away when Canada ceased to be a French depend- 
ency, and that "Greater Holland" passed away at the 
close of the Napoleonic wars, but it must not be forgotten 
that France has still a colonial population of thirty-two 
millions, and that she " protects " fourteen millions more; 
that the Netherlands has a colonial population of thirty- 
two millions, including her great possession of Java, with 
its incalculable wealth; that Spain has still a colonial pop- 
ulation of nine millions in America, Asia, and Africa, while 
' Greater Britain " has only twenty millions of colonial 
subjects on whom she can depend, for the 300,000,000 in 
India are not to be trusted for a day. In acres, it is true 
that "Greater Britain" surpasses all others in her 
colonial possessions, but that is owing to the vastness of 
Canada and Australia, the greater parts of which are unin- 
habitable wastes; but, in population, France and the 
Netherland have larger colonial populations than England 
at the present hour. Why, then, should Professor Seeley 
say that " there was once a ' Greater France,' a ' Greater 
Holland,' a 'Greater Spain,' and a 'Greater Portugal' 
as well as a 'Greater Britain,' but, from various causes, 
these four empires either perished, or have become insig- 
nificant." It is true that the homogenous character of the 
colonial possessions of England give her some advantage, 
but this fact does not justify Professor Seeley in saying 
that the colonial empire of France has " passed away or 
become insignificant," when we know that the trade of 
France with her colonies amounted to 600,000,000 francs, 
according to the latest returns. Even Portugal, to which 
he refers, has still a colonial population of more than five 
millions, and this is one-fourth the population of England's 
colonial population, for it must not be forgotten that India 
is not a colony, is not treated as a colony, and cannot be 
trusted to sustain England in her hour of trial. 

Then there is another question, in treating which Pro- 
fessor Seeley is mistaken, and that is where he refers to 
the rebellion of 1837 in Canada. Here he appears to think 
that the rebellion was confined to the French Canadians 
in the Province of Quebec, and that it was an affair of 
races. In this he is entirely wrong. Upper Canada, as it 
was then called, or Ontario, as it is called to-day, was in 
rebellion as well as Quebec, and the rebellion was not a 
question of races at all. This fact is well known to every 
student of Canadian history. 

As for India, Professor Seeley admits that that country 
may be separated from the British Empire any day. The 
danger, he says, lies in the fact that the populations of 
India have no memories, and that the benefits conferred 



by Bi ,!i forgotten by the 

..• English rule over Ind a 

been !■• on is undoubtedly true, bul Pro 

men who have been in India thai 

poys nave no or that the blowing from 

the guns is not treasured in their hate. The only hope of 

keeping India is by pursuing the Imperial policy of divide 
and conquer, and thai England has done, and is doing, 
successfully, in every part of the world where gucll 

icy is necessary for the preservation of ber possessions. 

On the whole, while Professor Seeley has become su. 

ful as an academie lecturer, he is by no means faultless, 

and not always accurate, 
'IV. 1 ■ 1. . 



"Echoes of Battle," bv Bushrod Washington James- 

Published by Henry T. Voates A Co., Philadelphia. A 
publisher's notice accompanies this book, and we are told 
that "This volume is one that will interest every Amer- 
ican. It should find its way into every patriotic home in 
this country, whose first steps towards Independence, and 
last blows for Union, are so graphically referred to in its 
pages." The publishers must excuse us, but we differ 
with their estimate of the book in toto. The stories are 
old, threadbare, and are already known in every American 
household in the land, that is in every household worthy of 
the name of American, and, besides, there is nothing 
"graphic" about them, while "the beautiful lauguage of 
the corresponding poems depicts with pathetic effective- 
ness some of the scenes," as the publishers say, exists 
only in the imagination of those who want a profit from 
the sale of the book. In plain words, the prose is weary, 
and the "poetry" rubbish, and after reading the book, we 
are forced to believe that it has been published at the 
author's expense, and any nincompoop can become an 
author on those conditions. 

Gunton's Magazine commends itself to the class of peo- 
ple who do not believe in jingoism, and who think it possible 
to be well-bred and wealthy, and be good Americans at 
the same time. The tone of the magazine is as respectful 
to honest toil as any labor organ in the land, but it does 
not think it necessary to brand every man who acts the 
gentleman as " a snob," because he has learned the lesson 
that culture is not antagonistic to the manly virtues. We 
wish Gunton's Magazine success, and we want to see more 
like it. 

"Life at Shut-in Valley; and other Pacific Coast 
Tales, ' ' by Clara Spaulding Brown. This book is a collection 
of short stories, plainly written, but evincing a keen knowl- 
edge of human nature. There is no depth of plot and no 
strong character drawing, but there are " plain unvar- 
nished tales " which are written with a freedom from aim- 
ing after effect, which is commendable. It is a book for 
boys and girls, rather than for mature men or women. 
But the reading is healthy and pure for any one. 

"Other Worlds Than Ours" might as well have been 
named "An Old Story Retold." There is not anew idea 
in the book from the beginning to the end. We have been 
told all the book contains over and over again. Of course 
"matter is the common property of the Universe," but 
what was the use of writing a volume to tell us so, for 
every school-boy has been taught that lesson nowadays. 
The book is, however, very interesting, but — only to those 
who do not know the rudiments of popular astronomy. 

The Appletons promise us a series of new stories about 
our West. They are to include " The Trapper," "The 
Explorer," "The Miner," " The Cowboy ,"" The Soldier, " 
"The Railroad," etc. If they come up to the promises 
made for them in advance, they will be worth reading, but 
— we shall see. 

"Trusts or Industrial Combinations in the United 
States " is the name of a remarkable book by a German, 
Ernest Von Halle. It looks to us, however, as if it were 
little more than a translation of Verein's great work on 
" Industrial Combinations In All Countries." 

Browning's complete works, in a single volume, are now 
ready. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, li 





-fey 

We Obey No Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

ONE of these sweet days to come, when 
the Government runs the trolleys, tele- 
graph, theatres, and newspapers, dramatic 
criticism, by the development of specialists, 
will be reduced to some sort of a definite 
88 art. Every big city will have its official 
journal, among the staff of which will -be a corps of men, 
each of whom has been appointed for the accuracy of his 
proboscis for certain things theatrical. There will be a 
reviewer of grand opera, another for comic opera, an 
analyst of farce-comedy, a thumper of problem plays, a 
scholarly guide to the tragic muse, an inspector of melo- 
drama, and a scrutator of burlesques and ballets. The 
judgment and integrity of these gentlemen will be above 
impeachment, and a set of signals, such as are used by the 
weather bureau, may be floated from the dizzy heights of 
the official newspaper building for the guidance of the 
people. There will be the frost flag for such creations as 
The Daughters of Eoe; an inflammatory, tobasco-tinted rag 
will chronicle the advent of a shapely ballet; a fog signal 
will announce the hopeless depths of mysticism and sym- 
bolism; the strength of operas may be gauged by wind 
signals, and so on, from the works of Wagner to De 
Koven, from Ibsen to Hoyt, may the populace be enlight- 
ened as to the character of the feasts that are before 
them. No longer will the hay, grain and cow editor be 
torn from his tranquil desk at night to "double" as the 
discusser of a study in sexual relaxations; nor will the 
dark-browed student of Shakespeare have to dilate on the 
chaste kicks and splits of Dolly Dooemup of the variety. 

* # * 

Melodrama, for one thing, is treated with too much flip- 
pancy nowadays. If you doubt the simple trustfulness 
that underlies your world-caloused nature; if your heart 
would sink and swell at the perils that assail and the 
bravery that immortalizes the heroine and the hero; if 
your spine would telegraph shivery messages from base to 
apex at the villain's murderous glare; if your feet would 
pulsate to the wondrous rhythm and your eyes bulge at 
the grotesque grace of movement of the pickaninny dances; 
if you would sniff the aroma of blue grass and thorough- 
breds, weep a little and laugh a great deal at an old- 
fashioned melodrama well told and acted, why, go to the 
California and see In Old Kentucky. You will find dynamite 
bombs, bowie knives, revolvers, rifles, and a gulch a hun- 
dred feet deep — in fact, all the deadly paraphernalia of 
melodrama except the side trouser pockets, cigarettes, 
and mortgages. You may miss the latter, and feel like 
saying with May Irwin: "Nomortgagel You po' thing, 
how lonesome you must be! " But a hundred feet of chasm 
will deepen a plot enough for the most exacting, and how 
long would a mortgage ride the homestead with a giant 
powder cartridge the size of a Frankfurter under it boom- 
ing skyward ? 

* * * 

In all seriousness, In Old Kentucky is a rattling good 
piece; in truth, one of the best of its kind that has ever 
visited us. Under the rapid whirl of incident and excite- 
ment there is a sure unity of construction, and though 
each sequence is candidly obvious, and accurate to one's 
ordinary anticipation of climax and finale, there is a novel 
unstrained effectiveness in the working out of the story 
and a really artistic attention to the details of local color. 
The race episode is better managed, by far, than that of. 
The Jilt : and the antics, songs, dances, and band-playing 
of the pickaninnies are so free and natural as to suggest 
a holiday romp for the jolly little colored folk rather than 
a stage performance. 

Laura Burt has made her Madge Brierly as distinct a 
creation as was Ada Lewis's tough girl. Her dialect is 
smooth and natural; she never poses, and the one little 
song she sings is done with consummate cleverness. Col. 
Sandusky Doolittle is a good specimen of Southern humor 
and chivalry as H. B. Bradley plays him, and Prank Lay- 



son is straightforward and convincing in Ralph Stuart's 
hands. Paul Scott's ultra-villainous Horace Holton is 
augmented by Svengali whiskers tha> seem to overshadow 
even his darkest crime. The company is a large one, and 
for the most part, happily chosen. 

* * * 

More by the popularity of the Prawley Company than 
through any particular merit in the play, has The Ensign 
drawn large houses nightly to the Columbia this week. 
Mr. Howarth's piece is a naval melodrama with a poorly 
developed plot, an abundance of vigorous action, and sev- 
eral good scenic effects. It ends with a hanging — the 
hanging of melodrama where the hero is rescued just as 
the noose is tightening about his neck, and the poor old 
mother and the despairing fiancee gather around 
the festivities in the most approved etiquette of stage exe- 
cutions. Mr. Prawley plays Ensign Baird — the part that 
so surprisingly distinguished him last season from the Mr. 
Prawley hibernating in a dress suit — with even added zeal 
and expedition. It is like the awakening of the lion. Mr. 
Arbuckle draws a strong piece of character as Cockson 
Dudley, and Mr. Leslie's midshipman is boyish and natural. 
Wilson Enos, as President Lincoln, has a role admirable 
for its make-up and profound thoughtfulness. Miss Bates 
and Miss Ross do their usual clever renderings of the 
heroine and ingenue. The remainder of the long cast is 

well sustained. 

* # * 

The concert given by Otto Bendix on Wednesday even- 
ing at Beethoven Hail, was well attended, in the face of a 
sudden and unexpected storm. The Tschaikowsky trio for 
piano, violin and cello was the opening number, played by 
Messrs. Bendix, Landsberger, and Von .der Mehden in 
rather a scattering fashion. Mr. Bendix is a wonderful 
pianist, about the best we have in San Francisco to-day, 
but he has not the art of sinking his identity in the 
ensemble when playing chamber music. The trio smacked 
too much of soloism to portray any unity of interpreta- 
tion. Mr. Landsberger played Nardini's sonata, a 
scholarly old composition, with its beautifully pathetic 
Larghetto, and Allegro bristling with complex double stops. 
It was agreeably rendered, but did not have the fervid 
breadth and flights of temperament that distinguish Mr. 
Landsberger's work when he is at his best. Mr. Bendix 
was happiest in the Chopin numbers, — thoughGrieg's Hol- 
berg suite was exquisitely done — the B minor Scherzo and 
the nocturne in D flat were the events of the evening. 

* * * 

Though there are many new and interesting features on 
the Orpheum's programme of this week, Miss Rachel 
Walker, the "Creole Nightingale," is the stellar attrac- 
tion. She sings such familiar old songs as "The Maid of 
Dundee" and "The LastRoseof Summer" in a clear, pure- 
toned soprano, so telling and sweet as to make the most 
enthusiastic devotee of the variety welcome the innovation 
of ballads sung with unostentatious art and good method. 
The sisters De Van do a hair-raising balancing act, and 
the De Witt sisters perform some clever musical specialties. 
It is a capital programme all through. 
* * * 

It has been a week of melodrama; cold chills and up- 
lifted hair, alternating with peals of laughter, has been 
the order at the Alcazar, where The Wolves of New York, in 
all its horror and mirth, has had a glowing presentation. 
For next week Mr. G rover announces J Canting Scoundrel; 
or, Wearing the Livery of Heaven to Serve the Devil, a comedy 
of San Francisco life, said to forcibly echo recent clerical 
lapses from grace. 

* # * 

The Man Without a I 'ountry adds another link to the long 
chain of melodramatic successes at the Grand. On Mon- 
day night a comedy-drama by Chas. T. Vincent and Louis 
Aldrich, will present Mr. Morosoo's players in a lighter 
vein, though there is enough exciting incident in the piece 
to satisfy the most ardent admirer of the blood-and- 
thunderous. 

* # * 

After tremendous successes at the St. Louis, Dallas, 
and Atlanta Expositions, John Philip Sousa and his peer- 
less band have begun their grand tour to the Pacific 
Coast. 



January 25, 1896. 



SAN FRANC 



The Tmvary Compaoi - . ■ .• opera season commi 
at the Baldwin on '■ .| lt February 3rd. Thw 

organization p» repertoire 

the lirst week the arrai 

ly matinee 
>y night, /' ■.. Thursday. V 

Friday, ' .1 / I',,., Saturday 

matinee, Martha, ami Saturday night, .' The 

any embra artists ti Mme. 

Tavary, time. Uchter, Sophia Romani, Theo. Dorre, 
Franklyn. Bella Tamtins, A I. Guide, Win. Stephens, 
Payne Clarke, Max Eugene, H. S Dudley, Wm. Schuster, 
A. AbramhorT. Joseph Wit 1 

• • * 

Next week will be the last of the Frawlev Company's en- 
gagement at the Columbia, and De Milie ami Belasoo'fi 

ounced Buccess, Men and W< n. Is to be the farewell 

play. It is the story of a young bank cashier gone wrong, 
full of strong situations, and will necessitate twenty people 
for the east. Men and Women is an intensely interesting 
play, and in the hands of the Frawley players should prove 
a great attraction. 

The programme of Paderewski's opening recital at the 
California will be announced in a few days. The initial 
concert takes place on the evening of February 10th, fol- 
lowed by matinees on the 12th and'Hth. Sherman, Clay & 
Co. open the sale of boxes and seats on Thursday, February 
6th. Paderewski is, beyond a doubt, the greatest pianist 
of to-day, and his coming will cause a revival in music 
circles. 

Txion dies hard in the public's esteem; its brilliant 
spectacles and specialties are to be continued for another 
week — positively the last — after which The Gentle Savage, 
a new American opera by the late E. J. Darling. The 
book was written by Estetle Clayton and Nym Crinkle, the 
well-known dramatic critic. 

In Old Kentucky will commence the second and last week 
of a highly successful engagement at the California on 
Monday night. Sendrick Hudson, Jr., an extravaganza 
said to be very picturesque and amusing, follows, pre- 
sented by the Kimball Opera Comique Company, headed 
by Corinne, the famous dancer and singer. 
# * * 

The new series of Carr-Beel Saturday pop concerts will 
begin on the afternoon of February 8th, at Golden Gate 
Hall. This will make the fifth year of these invaluable 
music readings, that have done so much to educate San 
Francisco to an intelligent understanding of the beauties 
of chamber music. The programme for the first concert 
includes Mozart's exquisitely melodious quintette for clar- 
inet and strings, Godard's trio for piano and strings, and 
the first performance here of Niel Gade's "Fantasie 
Stiike" for clarinet and piano. 

The Young Ladies' Orchestra, an organization that has 
done noble work fcr the charities of San Francisco and 
Oakland, is in need of a fund to insure its permanence, so 
a concert will be given at Metropolitan Hall on the even- 
ing of February 7th to further that end. 

* *• # 

. Mr. Daniel Frohman is the first to use the phonograph 
to assist in the rehearsal of a play. He intends to pro- 
duce Mr. H. A. Jones's new play, Michael and Ms Lost 
Angel, at New York, the same night that it is played for 
the first time at the Lyceum, and Mr. Jones has spoken 
the whole play into the phonograph. He is said to have 
used eight phonographic cylinders, which are now on their 
way to New York. When they reach America the 
manager will hear Mr. Jones's interpretation of his play, 
and this will be used as a guide at rehearsals. 

"Freund's Musical Weekly" has changed its title to "The 
Musical Age." It will, as formerly, be conducted by 
Harry Freund, and the new title and dress will be accom- 
panied by many happy changes and enlargements. 

It is more difficult to secure genuine old Japanese vases and 
bronzes nowadays in Japan than it is to buy them from George T. 
Marsh & Co. , at 625 Market street, under the Palace Hotel. 



California Theatre. u " 






- 
■ 



- 



OLD KENTUCKY. 

Ho pn> 
m. T lu- 
ll- thine rice, 
i\ Konturkjr Iboroufbt) 



Grill imkirs Tk/.-,l^« ll 
oiumDia 1 neatre- »■-■ 

■ 

'unary tTUl, 
For ooe week only. First production 
i.y tn. I K.WVI.KY t I ..UPANY, in ih Mfllfl 

MEN AND WOMEN. 
A. magolflcem product loo Twent) nve people in the oaal 

Ma .-■.:■■!. 



, Coughs and Hoarseness. The irritation that induces coughing is im- 
mediately relieved by using " Brou-n'* BranoMal Troches." A simple 
and sale remedy. 



Morosco's Grand Opera Mouse. 

Walter Morosoo, 9 ile Lessee and Proprietor. 
L&al performances oi ■■ The Man (VI thou I a Country." 
MONDAY EVENING, January tf7th—Vincenl A AIdrlch'8 great 
conit'tty drama, 

THE EDITOR. 

Matinees Saturdays and Sundays. 



Grower S MlcaZar. The Palais Royal of America 

Complete and overwhelming triumph of THE WOLVES OF 
NEW YORK 
Monday, January 27th, 

A CANTING SCOUNDREL. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Night Prices— 10c , 15c, 2oc, B5o., 50c. 
Matinee Prices— 10c, 15c, and s&c. 

T',-1! 0««> . H«,.«« Mks. Ernestine Kreling. 
IVOll Upera rlOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

One week more of the brilliant Spectacular success. 

IXION; or THE MAN OF THE WHEEL 

Our Next Production: Monday, February 3d, a new American 
opera, THE GhNTLE SAVAGE. Book by EstelleClaytonand 
Nym Crinkle. Music by E. I. Darling. Indian, Mexican, Cow- 
boy scenes. The '-ill Mining Camp Fandango. 
Popular Prices 35c and 50o 

O^^l Allm San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 
I P lie U Ml . street, between Stockton and Powell streets . 
Overwhelming success of our brilliant new company. 

9 NEW STARS. 

RACHEL WALKER, the Creole nightingale, the musical sen- 
sation of the city;. SrSTERri DE VAN, SISTEUS DE WITT, 
etc. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

Reserved Seats, 25c ; Balcony, 10c; Opera chairs and box 
seats, 50c. 



HAZELTON 
HEMME & LONG 
BROWN 8l SIMPSON 



735 Market St. 



PIANOS 



Pianos to Rent and sold on Installmets. 



PODESTfl & BflLDOGGfll, 



FLORISTS and DECORATORS, 



BAY VIEW NURSERY, 242 Sutter St , 

Between Kearny and Grant Avenue, San Francisco. Cal. 

Telephone Main 760. 



Dave Samson, 

PROGRESS 
RESTAURANT. 



Fine Mercantile Lunch. 
Imported Pilsener, Franciscaner, 
and Extra Pale Lager on draught. 

327 and 329. Bush St. 



I II I IAN RPnnARn The English actress, coaohes' ladles and gentle 
LILLIAN DLUUttnUt men for the dramatic profession; appearances ar- 
ranged. Shakespearean classes "Wednesday evenings. SHAKESPEAR- 
EAN ACADEMY. 913 Hyde street, San Francisco. Cal. . . ' ■ 

Tnnfe nn hoono M T\ Tel,, East-33. Residence' 1003 Sutter 
lt)lllc>UII UudllD, /fl. U. Office, City of Paris Building No. H 
Grant avenue. Ex-surgeon U. S. Army; Ex-surgeon S. F. Receiving Hos- 
pital. Hours, 11a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; 5 to 5:30 p. m. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 





FOR forty years 
the Cliff House 
_ -has been as famous 
the world over as the 
Yosemite Valley or 
Niagara Palls. Famous visitors at home and abroad have 
spent happy hours there watching the sea-lions and seals. 

Several years ago the historic Cliff House of old Califor- 
nia was accidentally consumed by fire, and the traditions 
associated about its ruins caused many a heart-pang 
among the old Californians. But Phoenix-like, a grander 
structure has arisen to console our city for the loss. 

The entire conception has been that of a genius. The 
new Cliff House rears its head, surrounded by dazzling 
minarets hundreds of feet above the raging sea — a sea that 
is never at rest. With the advantage of the most mag- 
nificent ocean spectacle of rocks, reefs, mountains, and 
ragged cliffs that has ever been known, all the luxuries of 
modern art have been lavished upon its interior. From the 
two great kitchens, with their host of cooks, to the splendid 
banquet hall, the ornate ball room, with its dainty dressing 
rooms and pretty cafe\ When the thousands of visitors 
begin to flock to the new Cliff House, they will have just 
at hand the noble Sutro Baths, the like of which has never 
been known among either ancients or moderns for magni- 
ficence and ingenuity of mechanical engineering. The sea 
waves dash day and night over the rocks that form its 
stately bulwarks, and cast themselves into a small rock- 
bottomed lake which is used for a "settling pond." Thence 
the freshest and purest ocean water constantly flows into 
the vast swimming tanks within the huge building. 

Added to this, the enterprise displayed by Mr. Sutro in 
constructing an electric railway last year, which conveys 
passengers straight from Central avenue to the baths and 
Cliff House, serves to doubly enhance the public value of 
the three splendid resorts which he has provided to San 
Francisco and to the entire visiting world. The grand 
depot which will serve as the terminus of the railway is 
right at the entrance of the baths, and in itself is one of 
the picturesque effects of the entire spectacle. This muni- 
ficent and unparalleled Trilogy of edifices devoted to the 
public service — the baths, with their awe-inspiring vest- 
ibule; the magic grace of the Cliff House, and the fair, 
romantic park on the Heights — all these form the best 
evidence of Mr. Sutro's real patriotism. Messrs. Wilkins 
and Pearson — for the latter gentleman had left Stockton 
to become Mr. Wilkins' associate — are fitting hosts of this 
castle by the sea. 

The New The New Cliff House is a marvel of beauty, 
Building. and architecturally is so adapted to the 
fierce, rocky eminence on which it stands, 
that imagination runs riot over its artistic radiance, its 
lofty sight and graceful structure, when viewed from the 
deck of a vessel approaching our Golden Gate. One of 
the best known men on the Pacific Coast is "Mine Host ' 
Wilkins, and he is remembered from London and New 
York to Yokohama and Sydney by the best people in any 
of those cities for his careful and luxurious hospitality. 
His partner, Mr. Pearson, is a gentleman of wide experi- 
ence. In refitting the new Cliff House all the best talent in 
San Francisco has been called to the front. A brief review 
of the various firms taking part in the mechanical and 
artistic achievements of this Palace by the Sea will be of 
interest : 

Building When a sculptor has designed a wonderful con- 

a Palace, ception in plaster, he turns it over to the most 
skilled artificers in marble, in order that his 
ideal may be a complete realization of the original. And so 
in the erection of the beautiful new Cliff House, our latest 
California wonder, Messrs. Campbell & Pettus, the con- 
tractors and builders, at 40 New Montgomery street, had 
complete charge of the realization of the architect's origi- 
nal designs. To produce a building of such grace and ele- 



gance, and yet at the same time secure its complete sta- 
bility on the edge of a sheer, rugged cliff has been no slight 
task, and the thousand and one details involved in achiev- 
ing such a perfect success have demanded the most unre- 
mitting attention. However, the result is a lasting trib- 
ute to the energy of Messrs. Campbell & Pettus, and doubly 
so to their mechanical knowledge. 

Artistic Wood-Work. For nearly thirty years the Excelsior 
Milling Company, whose place of 
business is at 713-717 Bryant St., Dear Fifth — the firm con- 
sisting of Messrs. David Bodge and Edgar L. Dunshee, has 
been first in the field for not only general milling work but 
for the execution, artistic effects, and designs in public 
buildings, and in private residences. There is hardly a 
wealthy mansion in San Francisco or Oakland which does 
not bear the impress of the firm in the way of richly 
moulded wood-work and interior and exterior decorations 
in wood, such as one finds in picturesque Europe. 
Hundreds of examples of their work might be pointed out, 
but at the moment, none better than their success at the 
New Cliff House could be named. All the milling work, 
including the doors, sashes and mouldings were constructed 
by the Excelsior Milling Company, and remains in itself a 
tribute to their thorough, substantial, and honest atten- 
tion to everything which they undertake. 

Staunch Timbers. Undoubtedly the most important 
feature in the construction of the New 
Cliff House has been the splendid, sound, well seasoned 
timber which the well-known firm, the Taylor Lumber Com- 
pany of West Berkeley, has furnished. It has given to the 
beautiful building on the rocky cliffs a solidity which will 
withstand the fiercest attacks of our winter storms. 
Their San Francisco office is in the Luning Building, at 
Market and Drumm streets. 

Aiding The diamond-like transparency of the best 

the Vista, modern plate-glass, together with non-fran- 
gible qualities, is especially to be remarked 
in the beautiful windows which Messrs. F. N. Woods & 
Co. have supplied to the new Cliff House. They are so 
clear that one would think them of pure crystal. This 
firm has also fitted up the new Parrott Building and many 
leading houses here. 

Artistic Designs One of the best-known firms in San Fran- 
in Hardware. cisco is the large establishment of the 
Palace Hardware Company, No. 603 
Market street. They have in its way the most varied 
and extensive stock west of the Mississippi. No better 
illustration of this can be had than the complete hardware 
outfit which they have just supplied to the new Cliff House. 
The builders' hardware used in the Parrott Building and 
other large edifices were also furnished by this firm. 

Perfection of Modern sanitary plumbing has been re- 
Plumbing, duced to an exact science, but, as in other 
crafts, one cannot always find the plumber 
who is master of his art. However, in G. C. Sweeney, of 
1141 Ellis street, the San Francisco public has recognized 
a genius. He is the successful conqueror of malaria. To 
appreciate his careful, artistic work, one should see the 
interior of the new Cliff House, to which he supplied all 
sanitary plumbing, gas-fitting, lavatories, etc. 

Cold Storage The "cold storage room" is becoming as 
Room. much in favor in San Francisco as it is in 

New York, since the well-known firm of 
Baeder & Fincke introduced its manufacture in San Fran- 
cisco. For bar, store, and office fittings this firm is cele- 
brated, and also for their bowling alleys. This firm is 
at 508 Fifth street, near Bryant. 

Luxurious The civilization so thoroughly manifested 

Bar Fittings, in our Eastern cities is rapidly repeating 

itself here, through the efforts of Schuster 

Brothers, of 306 Sutter street, in the matter of luxurious 

bar fittings. Everything that the most elaborate cafe in 



January 25, 1896. 



PRANCIS 



New York possesses has b- .-d to the Cliff I 

by this well-known firm— th>- . ounW-SUnk work. U 
pumps in the lower bar. the marble-work about the superb 
beer-pump, with its beautifl sUrer faucets — in short, tin- 
achievement is an ar - 

For the It is doubtful if in the world over one could 

Cordon Bleu, find more thoroughly appointed kii 
than Messrs John O. IN d I 
Kearny street, have prepared for the Cliff House. In the 
matter of ranges and all the accoutrements which apper- 
tain to the most modern requirements, the Cliff Bouse 
kitchens are unequaled on this coast It is completely satis 
factory to the cordon l,h» chffvtbo will preside over it. 

It* P»i»tiai The fairy-like interior of the new Cliff 
Furnishings. House has been produced by Messrs. J. 
Fredericks* Co., of 649 Market street. 
The rich carpets, the superb furniture, the rich curtains 
and portieri* — indeed, all the magnificent upholstery which 
this firm ha« used in the decoration of this establishment 
have made it a palace. 

The Lightning The elevator at the new Cliff House was 
Elevator. installed by W. L. Holman, of 230 Fre- 
mont street, and the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Co.. of 34-3U Main street; the former furnished the 
car, cables, and all the guiding apparatus, besides fur- 
nishing and building the cars for Sutro's Electric Railway. 
while the latter designed and built the winding machinery. 
and all the electrical controlling apparatus. The machine 
is of the worm-wheel type, the four car and two counter- 
weight cables being wound upon a spirally grooved drum. 
The motor is of the multi-polar type, wound to suit the 500 
volt circuit from the Sutro Electric Railway line. All 
high speed bearings are self-oiling, and the worms run in 
an oil bath. Attention is thus reduced to a minimum, and 
any one can take care of the mechanical parts. The car 
is grill work of neat design, and is very light and strong. 
The cables are of special manufacture, strong, pliable, and 
durable. All the movements are easily and quickly indi- 
cated by means of a lever in the car, which is the approved 
plan for such service. The control is obtained by a small 
current carried to the car through a thoroughly insulated 
flexible cable, from which there is not the slightest danger 
of obtaining a shock. The controlling mechanism is placed 
in the basement with the driving machinery, and the indi- 
cations carried to it by the small current. Its speed is 
300 feet per minute. Safety appliances are provided at 
all points, and the machinery is instantly stopped in case 
the current is interrupted from any cause. In all it is an 
engineering triumph for the Electrical Engineering Com- 
pany and W. L. Holman. 

Stopping The pioneer advocate of the cash register 
the Leaks, system in California was John J. Wilkins of 
the new Cliff House. He was first to place 
a machine in his establishment years ago, when they were 
a complete novelty. With his proverbial sagacity he real- 
ized, as he says, that they "stopped all leaks — accidental 
or otherwise ! " But as time goes by, there has been a 
wonderful improvement in the mechanism of these regis- 
ters, and at last perfection has been reached in the Na- 
tional Cash Registers, of which Messrs. Pierce & Co., at 
Room 12, Chronicle Building, are agents. Messrs. Wilkins 
and Pearson have adopted them for their grand enterprise 
at the Cliff. This invention has revolutionized the entire 
system, both for simplicity, surety, and artistic elegance. 

The Camera Berlin, Paris, London, and other great 
Obscura. European capitals possess that beautiful 
scientific phenomenon, the camera ob- 
scura, and now San Francisco is about to have hers. In 
the tower of the new Cliff House one will be able to view 
the splendid panorama of coast and shore through the 
medium of this ingenious apparatus. Mr. L. A. Berteling, 
the well-known scientific optician of 427 Kearny street, was 
the only man in the United States able to design and carry 
out its elaborate construction. 

Sweet Music. In the luxurious suites of the New Cliff 
House may be found the favorite, rich 
toned Sohmer pianos — which have the "singing" tone 
Liszt used to speak of. A dozen of them were furnished 
by their popular representative on the Pacific Coast, 
Byron Mauzy, 308-314 Post street. 



Pebat Beer 

Enclutively. 



the at !■ 

I 




fa moii 

.1 and in ' ■ 

■ 

1 the larj Ishmenl of 

its kind in the 

world. The beeroi 
this great conoerrj 
ha> always gained 
tin' highest honors 
at all expositions. 
< >nly last year it 
Beded in win- 
ning the first award 
against all compet- 
itors in Munich, 
Germany, the form- 
er greatest Lager 
beer brewing city 
of the world. The 
Pabst Brewing Co. 
turns out over a 
million barrels of 
beer every year, 
which is three hun- 
dred thousand bar- 
rels more than the 
next largest brew- 
ery in the United 
States. This cer- 
tainly attests the 
popularity of this 
beer. The Pabst 
Brewing Co. stands to-day at the head of all the brew- 
eries, and this position has been achieved solely through 
merit. The higb-spirited courage of the Pabst Brewing 
Co. in venturing upon one of the most ambitious schemes 
of the century deserves of the highest credit, and is a 
sufficient guarantee that the high standard of their beer 
will be maintained for all time to come. They were bound 
to have the best materials to produce the best beer, and 
they invested an enormous fortune to establish their world- 
wide reputatiou. The Royal Eagle Distilleries Co., the 
general agents of the Pabst Brewing Co. , have done their 
share to establish a constantly increasing demand for this 
famous beer in the city and vicinity. This well-known con- 
cern imported during the last year as much Pabst Mil- 
waukee beer in bulk into San Francisco as was imported 
from all the other Eastern breweries combined, and it is 
safe to say that in the hands of the Royal Eagle Distilleries 
Co. the demand for the famous Pabst beer will continually 
increase. 

Choice Brands It was lucky for William Lewis & Co., of 
of Cigars. 24 and 26 California street, that they 
secured so much good Havana tobacco 
before the recent Rebellion. Nowadays, with a fine stock 
of the "Porto del Oro," the "Adolph Sutro," and the 
"Purity Club," on hand, they are confident of the public 
verdict that they have the finest stock on the coast. These 
popular brands will always be kept on hand at the new 
Cliff House. 

The New A feature of the new Cliff House is the splen- 
Stabies. did and completely appointed stables and 
sheds, which have been built on the bluff to 
the north of the building and easy of access to it. The 
management takes great pride in this important innova- 
tion, and well they may. The floor of this stable is a very 
fine and excellent piece of work, laid in a manner new to 
this section, but common in the East. It is of Watson's 
asphalt mastic, and was done by the Pacific Refining and 
Roofing Company, of which Mr. W. J. Watson is manager. 
This company, whose office is at No. 153 Crocker Building, 
have extensive works at the Potrero, where they handle 
the entire coal tar product of the two gas companies here 
and that of many adjacent cities, and also refine asphalt, 
and make building and roofing papers and roofing mater- 
ials. They also do gravel roofing, a recent piece of their 
work having been the great court in the center of the Par- 
rott building, which work during its progress was _ in- 
spected by many of the architects and builders of the city, 
and elicited very favorable comment. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 




V HE craze of the period 
is certainly novelty. 
Hosts and hostesses are racking their imaginations for an 
original idea wherewith to entertain society. The peasant 
dance dinner to-night at the Tobins' is one of those which 
has taken practical shape; apropos of which a girl at 
recent University Club lunch was heard to say: "It's 
pretty good of the Tobin-Jarboe crowd to adopt the peas- 
ant costume notion when everybody knows it was one of 
them who raised such a fuss over peasant dress for the 
leap year cotillion. However, people needn't mind short 
dresses at a dinner table, don't you know, the feet are not 
shown." 

* * # 

The publication of the coats of arms borne by our people 
of aristocratic tendencies in a Sunday paper is amusing, 
if not instructive. The fact that a clan bearing the name 
of one lady's maiden patronymic exists in Scotland and 
thereby entitles her to. adopt their crest, is good. So, too, 
the dove flying forth being emblematic of the migratory 
strain in another family. Then we are told that no less 
than two armorial bearings ornament a swagger residence 
in the "Western Addition, though people conversant with 
the ancestry of its owner declare the ducal coronet is a 
puzzle, unless a motto can be used that "everything can be 
got for money." No wonder one of our first families changed 
the d in the original name to b, for who would wish to pose 
as coming from Essex as a bad male bird? 

* * * 

The girls are in a state of the most pleasurable excite- 
ment over the coming domino and mask party at the Pre- 
sidio, for as the men are to be simply in evening dress the 
pretty creatures will be enabled to intriguer them, as the 
French say, to any extent. The men may expect to have 
a perfect shower of raillery, all sorts of questions asked, 
and no doubt many confessions made under shelter of the 
mask; for ever since Juliet told Romeo of her love when 
the " mask of night" was on her face, that article has 
been found a handy thing to cover the confusion of such 
avowals. Lovely costumes are being discussed, and should 
the night be propitious a most enjoyable time is anticipated. 

* # * 

The recently announced matrimonial engagements of 
members of our best society will carry much consolation 
to those of our charming maidens of the swim who have 
been prominent figures therein for season after season 
without any of Cupid's darts having struck home for good 
and all. For it will be seen in each instance that the bride 
elect is one of that body herself; so the present sweet bud 
of the season can go on rejoicing for many a winter yet; 
there are lots of good times ahead ere sober matrimony 
calls a halt. 

* * * 

If that knowing old party, Dame Rumor, speaks by the 
card our social world is likely to have a real sensation ere 
long in the culmination— by a divorce suit— of what has 
been for some time called "domestic unpleasantness" in 
the affairs of a couple each of whom is very popular in the 
swim. No names are given, because everv one on the in- 
side will know who is meant, and to outsiders the matter 
is of no moment. 



They say the Brownies are in a state of exasperation 
this winter, and all because some of the erstwhile old club 
chaps have come out as dancers, and the girls prefer the 
oldsters every time. 

* * * 

"What a jolly good time Mrs. Millie Ashe-Sewell is hav- 
ing in her visit to her old home," is a remark heard on all 
sides. 

* * # 

The writer of the anonymous paragraph for "Sparks" 
evidently undervalues the department. However, we never 
return stamps, good cigars, or their equivalent. 



There is a murmur going round that the next "nov- 
elty " dance will be given in a big house ou the Avenue, 
and will be a " skirt dance." Those of the guests who are 
not adepts in this line must be contented to do the looking 
on act — like the dowagers at the cotillions — but the way 
the women are practicing the high kick would lead one to 
believe there will be a goodly number of dancers on the 

floor. 

* * * 

On dil, Al. Bowie and others are meditating an old 
bachelors' cotillion to be given either just before Lent or 
directly after Easter. Should the report be based on fact 
the affair is sure to be the climax of a most charming 

season. 

* # * 

The French conversation class is progressing so rapidly 
the Presidio chaps are now able to make use of the verb 
amour without committing themselves ; while the girls have 

mastered tenir. 

* * * 

W. D. Page and Miss Sarah Collier's names are being 
coupled most energetically of late by society folks. 

After dinner try A.dams' Pep3in Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum . Yon 
will rind it admirable. 

There will be a curious famine in Johannesburg, South Africa, for 
a time. During the rush of Americans and English to the great 
gold fields there vast quantities of Old Saratoga Whiskey have been 
ordered by our countrymen. The shipments were immense. But in 
the present trouble, how will they get it? 

Tne Latest Fall and Winter Goods 
have arrived. 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. Many novel- 
ties in Imported Wear. Shirts to order 
a Specialty 

622 Market St., (upstairs, opposite Palace Hotel San Francisco 



UP-TO-DATE 

At Moderate Prices. 



Tailoring 



J. H. HAWES, 

Mezzanine B. , Crocker Building. (Up one-half flight fronting on Post St.) 



Brandt & Go. 



FINE TAILORING 
139 Montgomery St. 



Wall Paper. 



Our new stock for the season 1895-96 is now arriving. 



G. W. Clark & Co. 



Elegant Designs and Colorings. 
653-655 Market Street. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 



For sale by all flrst-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 



W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



January 25, 1896. 



SAN FRANC! \VS I.I-TTKR. 



'3 



THE MAN ON THE DRY GOODS BOX 



T 



RUTH in fiction, anil, therefore, tins 

given to mi 

igo by .1 wi in Solano County, and it 

f. The la«lv referred to secured a pi 
• cy regarding her name, the location of the 
events, and every thing which might lead to the bringing 
home of the story to her •: 9 uuoos 

taken, the tale is given in sui>stance as she told it 
said: 

I had just buried Day husband. If you must know it. 
he shot himself out of unfounded jealousy at our borne down 
the country. He left behind, after 1 had sold our furniture 
and belongings, and had paid the expenses of the funeral, a 
widow with a baby two and a half years old. and with just 
seven dollars in my pocket on my arrival in San Km 
My trunk was at the depot, for 1 wanted to go op north to 
mother. But the fare was $7.05. and the railroad clerk 
could not take a cent less. I don't know when I had eaten 
but baby could not have had anything for twenty-four 
hours, and commenced to cry. How I got there 1 cannot 
tell, but I must have walked up from Fourth and Townsend 
to Market, and thence, trying in my poor way to devise 
some plan, have gone round and round the block bounded 
by Ellis. Market, and Stockton, till my fevered brain was 
raging. How long I did this I cannot tell, but it must 
have been for two or three hours, poor hungry baby crying 
and moaning in my arms incessantly. Suddenly I heard a 
voice by ray side and saw. through the film in my eyes, a 
gentleman well-dressed and of prepossessing appearance. 

"Madam," he said, as he lifted his hat, "you seem to be 
in trouble. If it is in my power will you let me assist you? " 

In a torrent of hurried words, half-crazed with sorrow 
and hunger, I told him my story. 

"Let us walk," he said, "as far as the restaurant oppo- 
site. Baby must be hungry, and you, too, surely need sus- 
tenance and rest. Come! " 

He took baby from my arms, and I followed blindly, 
and as one in a dream. 

We were soon seated and served with a luxurious break- 
fast, baby eating bread and milk until she fell asleep. 

"Now," said he, " let us go clown to the depot. You 
said you had seven dollars. Give them to me and I will 
supply the odd five cents, and put you on your way to your 
mother's home." 

I never doubted him for a moment, and gave it to him, 
although he might have run away with my all. He called 
a hack, drove to the depot, and in a few minutes had me 
seated comfortably on the boat, with my ticket in my 
purse for home. 

Just as the boat was within a minute of starting he 
asked permission to kiss the little one, 
and, as we started, he squeezed some- 
thing into her tiny fist, and, bending 
over to me, said: 

" Never forget the man on the dry- 
goods box." Then we started. 

I was stunned a few minutes after- 
ward, when baby held out her little 
red hand, and said: "Mamma, see 
what I dot! " 

I took the paper from her hand, 
and it was a $100 green-back. 

What was the mystery ? I puzzled 
over it for hours, and at last, in God's 
mercy, I understood everything. 



of tbt 



night, -aid rn\ , retiring. 

Hut my hi after undi 

stood at my window musing. 

There ».i ropty dry-goods t»'\ on the oppi 

oorner, and I had hardly bi minutes al the win- 

dow, full of painful thoughts, when I saw the man and 

woman creeping weai the sidewalk. When they 

came to the drj he took <>tT bis coat, and laid it 

inside. Then he helped the woman to crawl into it. and, 

savin;: Something I could not catch, mounted the top of it. 

and prepared t" -it there all night. 

A tlooil of tears broke up my reverie, and. hastily dl 

tng myself. 1 stole down stairs and crossed the street. 
' Here, my good man," 1 -aid. offering him a half-dollar. 

"Take this and get a bed for yourself and your wife." 

" Thank you." he said gravely, "but. we are all right 

for to-night. I will take your half-dollar, so that we can 

eat to-morrow. We can rest here. No One will molest US." 

In a second I pressed another half dollar into his hand, 

saying: "Sleep and eat too." Then 1 left them. 

I do no! often pray for people except for myself and 
baby, but from that night baby and I have never failed to 
ask God to bless the man who sat on the dry-goods box 
that dark, chilly night, and who afterward sent us up to 
Trinity County. Bread cast on the waters ? See how it 
came back to mo." t>. w. c. N. 



FHIL MAY. the English artist, knows more of drawing 
than of cricket, while Dr. W. G. Grace, the famous 
cricketer, knows more about the game than about anything 
else in the world. The latter is inclined to be critical, and 
when Mr. May published a picture pretending to show a 
cricket match he received the following telegram: "Why, 
oh, why does square leg wear wicket keeping gloves? W. 
G. Grace." At about mid-night Phil May came out into 
Fleet street and thought he would send an answer. So he 
went into the telegraph office and wrote it. The clerk, 
seeing the address, remarked that it was some miles from 
Bristol, and a special messenger would be required. "All 
right," said May, "send it off at once." And at about 
2:30 on a bleak December morning the champion was 
awakened from his first sleep and dug from his bed to read 
the reply. "To keep his hands warm. Phil May." — Ex. 

NEVER risk a joke, even the least offensive in its na- 
ture and the most common, with a person who is not 
well bred and possessed of sense to comprehend it, " was 
the opinion of the French philosopher Bruyere. 



Some seven years before, in com- 
pany with my brother, I was returning 
from the theatre to our rooms on 
Washington street. Coming along 
Kearny, we met a man and woman 
wearily plodding along the uneven 
sidewalk. 

The man, seeing us, left the woman 
and said: " For the love of God, lady, 
give me half a dollar to get a bed and 
breakfast for mv wife. She is starv- 



ing. 



I reached down to my pocket, when 



I The Cough 



I which Lingers 



because of a 
run down con- 
dition of the 
system, and is 
not affected by ordinary cough 
medicines, will yield readily to 

l§ceftl& £nvulsicru 

because it gives strength to the 
weakened body and enables it to 
throw off the disease* 

500. and $z.oo. All Druggists, ■ 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 




No Cause for The anxiety experienced here over the 
Undue Alarm, situation in which Mr. John Hays Ham- 
mond has been placed by the collapse of 
the recent enunte in the Transvaal, will, we hope, prove 
in the hereafter to have been unfounded. His connection 
with powerful London companies makes it their duty to 
protect him, and the British have never yet laid themselves 
open to the charge of having left a friend in distress. The 
Boer bogy has been greatly magnified over here by a class 
of individuals who always seize upon an opportunity of 
this kind to parade themselves before the public, and the 
more fuss they can kick up the greater the advertise- 
ment, which has the additional advantage of being cheap. 
From an intimate acquaintance with Mr. Hammond, we 
have no hesitation in expressing the belief that the charges 
of overt acts and conspiracy, in which the sensation- 
mongers have dealt so liberally of late, in connection with 
the young engineer's arrest, are simply baseless fabrica- 
tions. As the manager-in-chief of the vast mining inter- 
ests of the South African Company, Hammond had a duty 
to perform, irrespective of personal considerations, and 
true to his character, he fulfilled it. While the Volksraad 
may see fit to carry their primitive measures so far as to 
confiscate property belonging to anyone upon whom their 
suspicions may dwell as unfriendly, it is safe to say that 
they will not go so far in that direction beyond certain 
bounds. As for any intemperate measures being adopted, 
involving the lives of Mr. Hammond or his associates, 
the idea is too absurd. The Boers have too much 
common sense for any mad action of that kind. The 
incident may, however, serve to stir up our Government 
enough to take means of some forcible character to pro- 
tect its citizens from outrage in foreign lands. On top 
of Monroism for domestic use, we want a new doc- 
trine established for maintaining the dignity of the flag 
abroad. 

Comstook Judge Seawell has handed down a decision in 
Mining regard to the voting of proxy stock by Cal- 
Shares. ifornia companies, which will set at rest a lot 
of caviling which has been going on for some 
time on the subject. The point was raised in regard to 
the legality of the last Con. Cal. -Virginia, which was car- 
ried on, as usual, with all other Comstock companies, in- 
corporated here, in conformity with the requirements of 
the statutes, covering the elections of corporations. A 
stockholder claimed that voting stock by proxy was illegal, 
although the law says it can be done. Judge Seawell, in 
his decision, which sustaius the company's action in every 
particular, has decided this point finally, and the disturbers 
of the peace in stock circles will now have to dig up some 
new issue if they inteud to stay in business. A few more 
decisions of the kind will help the market in more ways 
than one, and clear the financial horizon of a cloud which 
has been hanging over it for some time past. The market 
has been quiet during the week, with very satisfactory 
reports from the mines, and especially from Savage and 
Occidental. 

A Profitable The Pioneer Miniug Company is now put- 
California ting in some powerful air compressors, 
Gold Mine, preparatory to extending its operations in 
the lower workings of their property. The 
company cleared over $6,000 last month, with its vast re- 
serves of ore practically untouched. The stock is now 
quoted at between $4 and $5 per share in Boston, a com- 
paratively low figure when the value of the mine is con- 
sidered. 

B ack-Sand Very little is heard now of the black-sand 
Phantasies, operations on the ocean beach. Some little 
time ago a revival of the craze furnished an 
opportunity for the theoretical scribbler to work off con- 
siderable surplus steam, and columns of matter appeared 
from this source. As usual, however, the results were 
not in consonance with the theories. 



California Miners The Gold Mining Exchange of San 
To the Front. Francisco held a meeting during the 
week to take some steps to aid John 
Hays Hammond and other Americans in jail at Pretoria, 
by urging the necessity for immediate action upon the 
President. The outcome was a call for a mass-meeting of 
citizens in the Chamber of Commerce to-day, when San 
Francisco will undoubtedly make a very forcible protest 
against any further delay in intervening some way or the 
other for the protection of citizens in South Africa. The 
prevailing opinion seems to be that when American citi- 
zens are illegally jailed abroad, it is about time to dis- 
pense with red-tape at home and get down to work with- 
out losing time in the mere diplomatic discussion of the 
case. 

The Fireman's The annual election of the Fireman's Fund 
Fund Insurance Company took place during the 

Election. week, and the following Board of Directors 
was re-elected to serve for the ensuing 
year: D. J. Staples, John O. Earl. John Barton, John H. Gard- 
iner, John T. Wright, Thomas S. Chard, W. H. Brown, F. 
W. Lougee, J. C. Coleman, John Bermingham, and Wm. 
J. Dutton. A comparison of the condition of the company 
is given in the annual statement, shows the steady in- 
crease made in the company's business, from which two 
years are here noted as sufficient to illustrate its remark- 
able growth: In 1890 assets were $2,431,717.79; reinsurance 
reserve, $797,618.97, and net surplus. $484,438.25. In 
1896 the assets had increased to $3,449,095.88; the rein- 
surance reserve had swelled to $1,218,571.74, and the net 
surplus was $987,205.09. 

Stockholders Must The Supreme Court has at last de- 
Now Pay Up. cided that the stockholders in the 
Pacific Bank are liable individually for 
their respective portions of the debts and liabilities of the 
insolvent corporation. In about half the time they were 
thinking over the matter, the Glasgow Bank Directors 
were sentenced to penal servitude, and its stockholders 
had either paid up, or had been sold out by the Sheriff. 
The failure of that concern, too, was not nearly so dis- 
reputable as that of the Pacific. If the whole manage- 
ment of this bank had its just deserts, they would be in 
the State Prison for life, and without any exception, 
either, on the ground of ignorance of the rascalities being 
perpetrated by a set of sanctimonious hypocrites. 

A Corner The ubiquitous, irrepressible, and never sue- 
in cessful Colonel North, the " Nitrate King, " 

Camphor, is reaching out for a still further extension of 
power in the world of commerce. His latest 
enterprise, according to a correspondent, is the purchase 
of all the camphor in the universe. Enormous stores of 
this commodity are pouring in on him, and the wags of 
Europe have already dubbed him the "camphorated Col- 
onel." He has an army of secretaries — a mine secretary, 
a railway secretary, and a nitrate secretary. The ap- 
pointment of a camphorated secretary is now politely sug- 
gested. 

The Magalia The Magalia mine, formerly known as the 
A Bonanza. Pushbacker, which was killed in this city 
by the petty jealousy which has ruined 
business in San Francisco, at the time Major McLaughlin 
brought it out at a great personal expense, is now said by 
the interior press to be without doubt the richest gravel 
mine in the State. The deposit is very rich, and now that 
the pay gravel has been reached, the owners will be re- 
paid in a gi-eat measure for their expensive outlay in sink- 
ing a shaft in a short run. This was another case of cast- 
ing pearls before swine. 

THE Leadville, Col., Herald-Democrat, in its annual 
mining review, shows the value of this year's product 
of the Leadville mines to be $13,318,774, an increase over 

1894 of $5,000,000. The net tons of ore smelted durmg 

1895 amounted to 349,710, producing 100,499 ounces of 
gold, 13,530,348 ounces of silver, 62,471,670 pounds of lead, 
and 4,584,906 pounds of copper. 

COLONEL William J. Sutherland, the prominent mining 
operator, is in town again after an absence of a few 
weeks on business connected with the large mining inter- 
ests under his control in Nevada. 



January 2$, 1896. 



SAN PRANCE imr. 



'5 




"Hear Ibe Crtcr." -Wbn lie <J»rll »rl ihoo!" 
" One that will pl»j ibe a«Tll. tit. villi joo." 



I limit to the impertinence of interrlewere, 

any doae of private o\ 1 nauseating 

for the editors of the daily press, they have not vet become 
known Every mole-bill of newt Is magnified to a moun- 
tain of importance, and the telegraph is strained 1 
the world of tidings that in all honor and decency should 
never be known outside the household in which it was Lorn. 
That no household is too sacred for the babbling newspaper 
p to enter, no name or position held m too great ven- 
eration to disclose to an impertinent world its inmost 
secrets, has now become disgracefully true to the man who 
has occupied the first position in thenation. Self-respect 
and decency are unknown to the paudors to public 
osity, and the family linen of ex-President Harrison has 
now begun to be washed before the whole country, and be- 
fore it is all pulled over and aired and displayed." it will be- 
more soiled than ever, and it will be wonderful if there 
shall be left one piece that is not spotted and smutched 
beyond the power of time or prayer "to make clean. No 
man was ever great to his valet", and the ex-President, 
before he leads YnafiancU to the altar, will see himself as 
others see him, weak, sinful, deformed, beyond the power 
of any introspection or memory to recognize. He will be 
made to forget that he ever had anything to be grateful to 
the American people for. He will see what a moral mon- 
ster he is believed to be. He will find his children have 
become his critics and his enemies, his constituents have be- 
come his inquisitors, his name known only to infamy. Like 
Lear he will seek for brotherhood in the tempest, and like 
Job he will curse the day on which he was born. Such is 
the benignant power of the daily press, and such the 
grateful respect of the American people. 

THE friends of Mr. John Hays Hammond have shown a 
commendable energy in trying to come to the rescue 
of this prisoner caught in the act of rebellion against the 
Government of President Kruger. "We don't know any- 
thing about what Hammond has done, nor what he has 
been charged with, nor whether he is wrong or right. 
And we do not know exactly what the punishment is likely 
to be. But we understand that, after the ordinary methods 
of Governments, when a person is found guilty of encom- 
passing the life of a Prince, or a Governor, or President, 
or the Government itself, that there is something with 
boiling oil in it. It does seem as if something ought to be 
done about it, and that, if it be true that nothing of the 
kind has happened, then nothing more ought to happen. 
It seems, furthermore, as if we didn't know much about 
matters in the Transvaal anyway, but that, as we have 
just slapped England in the face to make her mend her 
manners, we now ought, as we believe has been done, to 
request the English Government to interpose and save 
any imprudent malefactor from the power of an avenging 
and outraged President. When the news comes of what 
has occurred, we are certain that the very best will have 
happened, or we shall be mistaken. 

SINCE the great General Boum displayed his magnifi- 
cent war-like propensities in laying out his plans for 
the campaign, as the Grand Commander of her bouffe 
operatic Majesty, the Grand Duchess of Gerolstein, we 
have not had his equal, till the contemplated arrival of the 
successor of Campos on the Island of Cuba. There is now 
to be no more nonsense. The insurgents are now to be 
shot down, killed, annihilated — Bang, bang, bang. The 
pretended republic is to be blown to bits — -Bang, bang. 
The power of the majesty of Spain is to be incarnated in 
the person of General Weyler, bang, bang, and then there 
will be peace. Down with Campos. Up with Weyler. 
Death to rebels — Bang, bang, bang. 

AMID the din of scandal and hush of religious sympa- 
thizers, it is said that there has appeared an honest 
minister of the Gospel. Be it known, no notice would pro- 
bably have been taken of his unusual virtue, but that he 
slopped over in his pulpit, displayed his ignorance of that 



of « i 

Ruill.'- surprising thai 

luck, happen lo hit on 

not guilty Bui it was just the luck of the Rev, Dr. 

here was a chance for Vice to pul on airs "f 

Virtu.'. It did, and said Dr. Case had lied. ThenDr 

went down among the lawyers, and, tor onci 
enlightened a little, and saw that be was wrong, and then, 
with a degree "f decency and manliness thai Is conspicuous 
by its manifold absence, be went up into bis pulpit and said 
he had been wrong. As it is probably the only time 

world's history when the "solid night" have been right 

and Dr. Case entirely wrong, it seems to be such an 
sion as calls for the setting apart by the Governor of a day 

for thanksgiving and prayer, and offering the sacril 
the American bird of freedom, the turkey, and we hope 
the Governor will bestir himself, and issue his proclamation 
to that effect. 

St OIK day, in the happy visitation of an avenging Provi- 
dence, people who have learned the alphabet will rise 
up as one man in every city in the land and irredeemably 
destroy all the printing presses and the immaculate sheets 
not yet stained with the drivel that is daily stamped upon 
them and spread over the face of the earth. If the news- 
papers do not outdo themselves in private scandal, they 
nauseate mankind with the profundity of their idiocy in 
reference to the probable action of great governments. The 
diapered babes, who in their columns slobber prophesies 
to entertain a credulous world, have evinced the embryotic 
condition of their brains in elucidating the purposes of the 
Government of Queen Victoria. Its fleet of warships is to 
cross the Atlantic to overcome the United States and 
knock Venezuela into smithereens. The English Govern- 
ment is going to buy Cuba, probably take it in ex-change 
for Gibraltar, and so on to the end of impossibilities. It is so 
customary for the English or any other Government to tell 
childish stories of childish purposes, that babes who read 
such stuff may find consolation and comfort in believing it. 
When the millennium comes there will be great guillotines, 
set up everywhere, for the immediate execution of the 
fools who print such vapidities, and the fools who spend 
their time in reading them. 

IF there were any bigger fools in the community than the 
fellows who have been granted the opportunity to utter 
their idiocies from the pulpit, we should not mention them 
half so often. But their folly is born with them, and will 
disappear only with themselves. These so-called teachers 
of morals and religion, catching the tune set by the re- 
cent scandals connected with one of their own, have dared 
in public to doubt the propriety of permitting themselves 
to be left alone in the company of women. One of them, 
on the pretense of being above such insinuations, helps dis- 
seminate the implied affront by proclaiming that ladies 
will be admitted to his studio alone. The devil himself, who 
occasionally helps along the cause of morality by increas- 
ing immorality, will find no nastier food for his maw than 
this whole gang. The man who stands in a house of God, 
or within its precincts, and dares to hint a belief that 
women are not throughout the world, and for all time, of 
better instincts and higher morals than the sex which con- 
tinually seeks them as its victims, has not yet learned the 
alphabet of decency and morality, and should be kicked 
from the place he contaminates, out of communion with 
mankind, and into the place of everlasting punishment and 
remorse and damnation. 

THE prize-fighters are very eager to get at each other, 
now that it is probable that the law will prevent 
them the brutal pleasure. Even Choynski grows brave, 
and threatens to ford the swollen Jordon, yet conscious 
that there is a rope tied to him. And Corbett boasts him 
as if it were not possible for him to lose the belt by which 
he sinched the whole world. Why not turn these human 
tigers into a rough-and-tumble ring, and halloo: " blood to 
the bloodiest! " Only make them fight minus spectators, 
just for the love of fighting. Yet, since the world is so 
big with the threat of war, a little bout with the knuckles 
ought not to be so shockingly bad. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Januaty 25, 1896. 




THERE is a tiny old southern "Colonel" — who was a 
Captain in the Mexican war — also a volunteer in the 
Seminole war, among other South Carolina gentlemen. He 
is very correct, very dapper, and remembers every duel 
that was fought in our first half century of this era. He is 
a friend of Major "Ned" Palmer — (the celebrated gourmet 
who makes terrapin stews for Jimmy Coleman, Theodore 
Payne and Daniel O'Connell, and eats them all up). 
Saturday afternoon last as the Colonel was about 
to take his car for the ferry, Major Palmer 
happening by, the two entered an ancient and time 
honored retreat for the purpose of discussing the 
characters of the Governors of North and South Carolina. 

As the two paragons of old-fashioned chivalry stood at 
the polished mahogany bar, a well-known local sailor- 
boarding-house " runLer " at their side asked for a whiskey 
straight. The barkeeper arranged two hot toddies and 
one straight whiskey before the three personages. 

Now the Colonel is very near-sighted, and, instead of 
taking his own drink, he reached forward and raised the 
straight whiskey of the burly water-front stranger toward 
his lips. 

In an instant, a heavy paw clutched the fragile Colonel's 
shoulder and a harsh voice roared out: 

" Leave that drink alone, you Old Fool! That's mine! 
Blank you! " 

The debonair relic of a former and polished age, laid 
down the whiskey with a Chesterfieldian bow. Then ad- 
justing his eye-glasses, said with the sweetest smile and in 
his deepest Southern dialect: 

" Sir, you do me honor, sir; you are a gentleman of sense 
and discernment, sir, and I respect your judgment. I am 
an ' old fool, ' sir. You are perfectly right, sir. Because 
I am so filled with regret, sir, at the terrible misfortune, 
sir, which first led your parents to meet each other, sir! " 

Of course the bully who did not comprehend a word of 
this grandiloquence, grumbled, gulped his liquor, and left. 

" If he'd have said another wurrd, Colonel," exclaimed 
Tom Cunningham, — the proide uv Ireland — (who had been 
standing close by) "I'd have smashed him from here to 
Banagher! " 

Tom is a great admirer of the Colonel, and he certainly 
would have carried out his word. 



Who will not see me wave my band, 
When on the curbstone's edge I stand, 
Nor stop the car at my demand ? 

The gripman. 
Who on my shiny, satin basque, 
Will, smirking, put his greasy grasp, 
And set for me a two hour task 
cleansing the imprint of his big paw with benzine, and swearing 
about as much as any real lady is ever permitted to swear 1 
The conductor. 
* # * 

Colonel Dickey was real mad one day last week. The 
jolly veteran had not called the races right, couldn't guess 
a horse even for place; the cook was out of sorts, too, and 
everything seemed to go wrong. So, when a shabby-look- 
ing fellow, who had smuggled himseif into one of the rear 
dining rooms, and then had ordered and eaten a three dol- 
lar meal, and washed it down with a quart of claret, told 
Colonel Dickey that he could not pay him, that usually ur- 
bane gentleman landed a kick between the beat's coat- 
tails — just where he, thought it would do the most good. 

The fellow made no attempt to resent the indignity, but 
simply remarked in a sad tone, "You will be sorry for this 
some day, Colonel," trudged off through the storm. And 
the Colonel was sorry, very sorry, and this is the way it 
came about : 

On Tuesday afternoon a swell double team halted at the 
Colonel's door, and a young and fashionably dressed man 
flung the reins to a groom and jumped out with his friend. 
Colonel Dickey had a glimpse of them as they passed 



through the bar room. "Treat those fellows well," he 
enjoined the head waiter, " they are bloods, sure." And 
they were well treated. They ate sumptuously and quaffed 
Pommery Sec with the keen relish of epicures. As they 
finished the dessert and topped it off with some fine brandy, 
the Colonel entered. At once he recognized the tramp of 
a few days before, and felt that he had made a mistake in 
chastising him. 

"Ah, Colonel," said the stranger, pleasantly, as he 
glanced over the bill, "here you are. I knew you would 
be sorry," and parting his coat tails, he asked mildly, 
"please kick again." 

Dickey was too dumbfounded to accept the invitation, 

and before he recovered his senses the imperturbable beat 

was gone. But the bill, like its predecessor, still remains 

unpaid. 

# * * 

The deacons wait— are all prepared to deal with parson Brown, 
And judge if he the cross shall bear, or wear the martyr's crown ; 
Mysterious Mattie Overman has modestly declared 
She'd tell of all those walks and drives that she and Brown have 

shared ; 
The pious Mrs. Tunnel's tongue has burst its rigid fetters, 
And that good dame will not deny those very curious letters ; 
But Parson Brown's sad liver has shown its strong dislike 
To see its master under lire, and so has gone on strike, 
Most worthy deacons, put an end to those vexatious ills, 
And fill your laggard parson full of anti-bilious pills. 



That part of the community which pats itself on the 
back and calls itself the musical world, is getting ready to 
be startled into wonder and gabbling applause. She has 
just returned from Europe, where she has gratuitously sur- 
prised the musical connoisseurs of the Old World by her 
unparalleled register. It begins down among the low notes 
of the contralto, and, in its upward flight, passes the lim- 
itations of the greatest singers of the past and present. 
From the lofty summit of E in altissimo, which is located 
on the Mt. St. Elias of the staff, she twitters and trills 
where there are no companions to rival her, and looks 
down on the ambitious reaches of Patti and Nilsson, even 
probably holding in contempt the wonderful Eiffel-tower 
note of the sky-rockety Sybil — early praised everywhere, 
till later nowhere named. But this unsurpassable She 
comes from the country of the unsurpassable, our own 
modest, but superior California. It is Miss Ellen Beach 
Yaw, and it is all because of a wonderful neck, that her 
admirers declare to be as graceful as a swan's, and which 
in innocent and trustful confidence she unfolds to public 
gaze and never takes a reef in it. It is the nest of sweet- 
est sounds. It is young and white and far reaching. It is 
full of promise and promissory notes, and we shall wait to 
get our share. 



'Tis strange that the Eagle, with all his defi on, 
Should ask, for Jack Hammond's protection, the lion; 
Is St. George's white standard in those petty wars 
More potent to shelter than our stars and bars ? 
Are we to assume that the Boer would not heed 
Our appeal in behalf of our people in need 1 
That forsooth we must ask from one, he not our friend, 
The safeguard the flag we dislike much may lend. 
The fact is apparent mid blowing and thunder, 
Those Washington statesmen are too prone to blunder. 



Charles Josselyn, since the cares and responsibilities of 
bis Alhambra Theatre, at Redwood City, squatted on his 
shoulders, has undergone a change which has given his 
friends some passing uneasiness. His usually frank 
American mode of expression has been abandoned for one, 
possibly more in harmony with the character of a 
theatrical manager, but which, it must be confessed, 
sounds rather odd when introduced into the ordinary 
affairs of life. Now, on Tuesday Mr. Josselyn when 
seated in his favorite nook in the Bohemian Club, was 
accosted by that grave philosopher and unnatural scientist, 
George Nagle. 

"Charley," said Mr. Nagle, the light of hospitality 
beaming in his mild blue eye, "have you been to luncheon 
yet?" 

"Marry and come up, but naught of viands have passed 



January 25. 1896. 



PR \N\ 



;>s to-day." rvjoincl the manner. -1111 foraootb, it 
th near the hour of noon." 

•vit tliou str; 
hum" I would fain fit witl 

at the board, for mine entra 

lanre most mightily. Little thou kl 
how we who deal with sock and buskin lay awake o nights 

Mai Us no 

by my faith, to make merry for those burghers 
of Redwood. Gad looks! but the knaves are oritical. 
They come with their j»ood dame-, and buxom daughters, 
and because they pay a few silvern a. forsooth, 

that we must tickle them in the midriff all night for the 
same. Thou mindest that clever limner. Jack Stanton, he 
that deviseth the Moorish scene for our drop curtain. 
Why. I am a shotten herring, if those same burghers did 
not swear that Stanton had taken that same cunning con- 
ceit from a nook in Sullivan's alley, the Chinese qui 
you know. Hallo, here cometh that jocose leech 
more, an' by my faith, he looketh as grave as if he had 
just plastered a broken pate 

There was no smile, indeed, on Dr. Chismore's face as 
his hand wandered professionally to Manager Josselyn's 
pulse. 

"Rest," he whispered to Mr. Nagle, •complete rest 
from the worry of theatrical management, is all that out- 
poor friend needs." 

* * * 

Reeild the royal scepter, and furbish up the throne, 

The regal robes fetch from the wash, the king will have his own ; 

No matter how the Junta raves, the cackling of geese 

That once saved Rome, will not restrain the lambkins from their 

fleece; 
Too long they've shivered in the cold, all pastureless and starved, 
Quite crowded out while others grabbed political award, 
But now they've massed together, and sworn by the Book, 
King Christopher shall reign again, and wave his magic crook. 

* * * 

In a Pacific Avenue Drawing Room. 

Mr. Vealsox (with animation) — This afternoon, as I 
was coming along Market street, I met the Rev. Mr. 

Mr. Yearby (in a low tone)— Sh-sh-h-h. There are 
ladies present. 

* * * 

In the St. Anthony Sewing Circle. 

Mrs. Soultox — Poor dear Dr. Brown, how he must 
suffer, innocent as he is. 

Miss Boxes — Yes, and how good and noble it is of him 
to give Miss Overman a home and moral support under 
the circumstances. 

Mrs. Soultox — Indeed it is. I'm sure the hussy made 
all the advances. 

* * * 

Oakland's poet parson, on Broadway's muddy street, 
Two bloomer girls met one day, and smiled upon their feet ; 
Why, angry gossips, why deny this gifted son of song 
A peep at ankles neat and trim, why call such glances wrong ? 
When nature has been lavish in graceful curve and line, 
Who'd bar from contemplating them, this eloquent divine ? 
Only some acid virgins, whose face sweet milk would curl, 
' Would bid the Kev. Davis shun those winsome bloomer girls. 
Or would infer his innocence this passing glance might hurt, 
And lead him to embalm in verse. the bifurcated skirt. 

* * * 

Emile Sauret, the distinguished French violinist, arrived 
in New York the 11th inst. on the Etruria, for his first con- 
cert tour in this country since 1877. He is now head profes- 
sor at the Royal academy in London, and has never held a 
more prominent place as a violinist than at the present 
time, although he has been nearly forgotten in America. 
His concert tour will include most of the leading cities of 
the country. Mr. Sauret does not, like Ysaye, come of 
musical stock. His grandfather was a general of artillery 
under Napoleon, and he does not number a single musician 
among his ancestors. 

Sir Edwin Arnold is going to Japan again for curios. He is a 
great friend, by the way, of George T. Marsh & Co., who have such 
a splendid collection under the Palace Hotel. 



T 



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_____ BALTIMORE, MD. ' 



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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 25, 1896. 



OBITUARY. 

THE death of Page Brown, the architect, is universally 
deplored by the entire community. This time, when 
Old Father Time has carried with him so bright, so buoy- 
ant, so hopeful a spirit as this young man, who came here 
eight years ago, and who put all his nervous, honest, even 
passionate strength into the work which has produced the 
revolution of good taste and simplicity in San Francisco 
and California, it is indeed for us on the Pacific Coast a 
public calamity. Page Brown once said when he had num- 
erous orders to fulfill:" "How I wish I had remained in 
McKim, Meade & White's office, in New York, after I 
came back from Europe! I've got too much work to 
' digest ' here, and how I should like to have had two or 
three years to simply carry out one idea at a time ! " 

It was honest and pathetic, this, and he thoroughly 
meant it. His influence during his stay in California was 
a reflection of the great Richardson and White, but he lent 
a certain touch of original grace and genius to the masters 
whom he followed that was mi generis. Indeed, he seemed 
to grasp the meaning of our climate and of our hills and 
"steeps." 

Since his accident three months ago at Burlingame, when 
he was thrown from a village-cart by the mad act of a 
vicious horse, he has been slowly dying, and his friends 
have realized that life was fading quickly away. Mr. 
Brown leaves a wife (the daughter of General Roger A. 
Pryor, of New York), and three children. 

Signora Teresa Spivalo. There died in this city, January 
17 th, Signora Teresa Spivalo, the 
mother of Augustus D. Spivalo, the attorney. An Italian 
noblewoman, of the distinguished house of Balzano, which 
dates from the days of King Monfred, of Sicily, in 1230, and 
whose ancestors came into Tuscany with Frederick Second 
when he occupied Southernltaly, after Manfred's conquests, 
she possessed the dignity and grace which is ever noblesse 
oblige. Admired by so many of our citizens throughout 
the State during the early days, it is no wonder that, 
when this lady passed away at the age of eighty four-years, 
she should be mourned, not only by her beloved friends in 
San Francisco, but throughout the State. The wife of 
Captain G. Spivalo, she first visited California in 1840, and 
was the first Italian lady to come "round the Horn." 
Her memory was marvelous, and had a steel-like tenacity. 
Give her the cue, and she would readily recite any portion 
of Dante, Ariosto, Tasso, or Petrarch. The music of her 
words was indeed like the honey of Hyblis. 



THE demand for California olive oil has been such since 
1889 that the whole product has been sold almost as 
soon as offered. Last year's product was about 75,000 
gallons. The United States has been importing annually 
850,000 gallons of olive oil, with a great deal of cheap 
adulterated oil. There is thus an unlimited market for 
genuine native oil. Within ten years a new method of 
growing olive trees from small cuttings instead of from 
large limbs as formerly has reduced the expense of start- 
ing a tree from seven or eight dollars to ten or fifteen 
cents. It requires seven years to mature the young trees 
sufficiently to produce profitable crops. At ten years 
of age a tree bears from four to seven gallons of olives for 
each tree. — Self Culture. 



THE finances of the Atlanta exposition appear to be in 
an uncertain condition, for it is said that all the 
buildings of the exposition company, including the woman's 
building, are mortgaged to secure a recent loan of $100,000 
made to supply the deficit in the revenue. A syndicate 
with S. M. Inman, the railroad magnate at its head, ad- 
vanced this money, and took the mortgage as security, 
and one of the conditions of the latter is that 12 1-2 per 
cent of the gate receipts shall be paid on its account each 
day. There is a loud protest from the managers of the 
woman's building at this probability that they may lose 
all they have put into it and the buildings which they are 
anxious to preserve. 

When the Roman orator Cicero failed to acquit a poet client who 
was exiled to Marseilles, he received a letter saying, *'I am happy in 
exile! I never tasted such oysters!" Bat then that was before the 
time of Moraghan, whose famous depot is in the California Market. 




Captain P. T. Brown. 



A POPULAR APPOINTMENT. 

HARDLY any appointment of the past few years has 
given more universal satisfaction in commercial cir- 
cles than the appointment of Captain P. T. Brown, the 

new Dredger Superin- 
1 r— ;•] tendent. In fact, this 

' time the Harbor Com- 
missioners pleased 
everybody. Of course 
for the past six years 
he has been constantly 
in the State employ, 
and in charge of Dred- 
ger No. 1, but his 
steadfast attention to 
the problem of improv- 
ing our water front 
and his magnificent 
executive ability have 
repeatedly won the re- 
spect and admiration 
of the Commissioners 
— and yet, several 
times when it has been 
intimated that he 
might easily attain his 
present official posi- 
tion he quietly declined 
to make any endeavor in the shape of what he termed "a 
fight" for the place. And now the office has sought the 
man successfully. Probably no one knows the needs of 
our bay better than Captain Brown. Long years of 
efficient service have given him a knowledge which few 
possess. A stern advocate of economy, he is painfully 
scrupulous in matters concerning public expenditure. 

It is a comment upon his disinterestedness that he did 
not know even that the Board was considering him, until 
his appointment was announced. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

New Basil Consolidated Qravel Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Placer County, Cal. 

NOTICE— There are delimiuent upon the following described stock, on 
account of an assessment (No ), levied on the 9th day of November, t895, 
the several amounts set opposite the names of the respective sharehold- 
ers, as follows: 

NAMES. NO. CERTIFICATE. NO. SHARES. AMOUNT. 

L. Dornberger 19 750 $37 50 

C. Buxtorf 13 1050 52 50 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of Directors, made 
on the 9th day of November, 1895, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
the company, No 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, California, on 

MONDAY, TRE 10th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1895, 
at the hour of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

F. X SIMON, Secretary. 
Office: 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DR RIPORn'C: RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
ur\. niuunu o ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, SI 25; of 100 pills, »2; of 200 pills, 
J3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills. »2. Send for circular. 



Pacific Towel Company. 



No. 



Lick Place 



Furnishes clean Towels at the following low rates : Clean hand 
towels each week, $1 per month; 13 clean hand towels each week; 
$1 50 per month; 4 clean roller towels each week, $1, 6 months 
6 clean roller towels each week, $1 25 per month. 

J. fl. W. LundDorg, Dentist, 

336 POST STREET, Rooms 2-3. (Opposite Union Square 
Telephone 2275. San Francisco. 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market street 



£)R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 



409K Post St., San Francisco. 



Dentist. 



Weak Hen and Women S^.J^'S&S.i.rS: 

edy; it gives health and strength to the Sexual rgans. Depot at 323 Mar- 
ket street. San Francisco. (Send for circular.) 



January 25. 1S96. 



FRANCISCO NEWS 







mm±M 



MY PLAYMATES.-***.* mu>. 

THK wind comes whispering to me of the country green mil cool, 
iwing blackbird? chattering beside a reedy pool; 
It brings me soothing fancies of the homestead on the hill. 
And I hear the thrush's evening song and the robin's morning trill ; 
So I fall to thinking tenderly of those I used to know 
Where the sassafras and snakeroot and checkerberries grow. 
What has become of Ezra Marsh, who lived on Baker's Hill? 
And what's become of Noble Pratt, whose father kept the mill? 
And what's become of Lizzie Crum and Anastasia Bnell, 
And of Roxie Root, who tended school in Boston for a spell? 
They were the boys and they the girls who shared my youthful play ; 
They do not answer to my call ! My playmates, where are they? 
What has become of Levi and his little brother Joe, 
Who lived next door to where we lived some forty years ago? 
I'd like to see thelXewton boys and Qainoy Adams Brown, 
And Hepsy Hall and Ella Cowles who spelled the whole school down! 
And Gracie Smith, the Cutler boys. Leander Snow, and all 
Who I am sure would answer could they only hear my call! 
I'd like to see Bill Warner and the Conkey boys again, 
And talk about the time we used to wish that we were men ! 
And one, I shall not name her, could I see her gentle face 
And hear her girlish treble in this distant, lonely place! 
The flowers and hopes of springtime, they perished long ago, 
And the garden where they blossomed is white with winter snow. 
O cottage 'neath the maples, have you seen those girls and boys 
That but a little while ago made, oh ! such pleasant noise? 

trees, and hills, and brooks, and lanes, and meadows, do you know 
Where I shall find my little friends of forty years ago ? 

You see, I'm old and weary, and I've traveled long and far; 

1 am looking for my playmates; I wonder where they are! 



WHEN I WAS A BOY. -exchangc. 



Up in the attic where I slept 

When I was a boy, a little boy, 

In through the lattice the moonlight crept, 

Bringing a tide of dreams that swept 

Over the low, red trundle-bed , 

Bathing the tangled, curly head. 

While moon-beams played at hide-and-seek 

With the dimples on the sun-browned cheek- 
When I was a boy, a little boy. 

And O ! the dreams — the dreams I dreamed ! 

When I was a boy, a little boy I 
For the grace that through the lattice streamed 
Over my folded eyelids seemed 
To have the gift of prophecy, 
And to bring me glimpses of times to be 
When manhood's clarion seemed to call — 
Ah I that was the sweetest dream of all, 

When I was a boy, a little boy. 

I'd like to sleep where I used to sleep, 
When I was a boy, a little boy I 
For in at the lattice the moon would peep , 
Bringing her tide of dreams to sweep 
The crosses and griefs of the years away 
From the heart that is weary and faint to-day ; 
And those dreams should give me back again 
A peace I have never known since then — 
When I was a boy, a little boy ! 



EXPERIENCE.— auce uahlano rolling. 



A child laid in the grave ere it had known 

Earth held delight beyond its mother's kiss;— 
A fair girl passing from a world like this 

Unto God's vast eternity, alone; — 

A brave man's soul in one brief instant thrown 
To deepest agony from highest bliss;— 
A woman steeling her young heart to miss 

All joys in life, one dear one having flown ;— 

These have I seen ; yet happier these, I said, 
Than one who, by experience made strong. 

Learning to live without the precious dead, 
Survive despair, outlive remorse and wrong, 

Can say when new grief comes, with unbowed head, 
" Let me not mourn 1 I shall forget ere long ! " 




Dollars or Kicks 



1 1 . * 1 ■ 1 ■ 1 ■ • 1 1 . 1 1 -> 

$ Pearline is ec 
All that ruino 
bine that mat 



for women, according to whether 

they do, <>r don't th>. their washing 

in a sensible way. If they 1 

Pearline, it means good, 

hard dollars saved. 

Pearline is economy. 

iiiuus rub- 

iing Uiat makes you 
buy linens and flannels twice as 
often as you need to, is spared, to say 
nothing of your time and labor. See 
the troubles that women have to endure with 
other ways of washing. There's that hard, 
wearing-out rub, rub, rub, or the danger of 
ruining things with acids if you try to make it 
easy. Washing with Pearline is absolutely safe. 

JAMES PYLE, New York. 
Conducted on both the 

European and 
American plan 

Bosa street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F. 

This favorite hotel is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Family and Busi- 
ness Men's Hotel in San Francisco Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, 
first-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room: Per day. $1.25, $150. $1.75 and $2; per week, $7 to $12; 
per month, $27.50 to $40; single room, 50 cents to $1. 

«->-Free coach to and from the Hotel. 



Beware of imitations. 



Broody.? 
Jtotel • • 



RIGGS HOUSE 



j Washington, D. C. 
The Hotel " Par Excellence " — =■ 



of the National Capital. First-class in 
all appointments. O G. STAPLES, 
President; G. DeWITT, Treas. 

American plan, $3 per day and upward. 



£bbitt Jiousi?, 



WASHINGTON, D. C 
H C BORCH. Manager. 



POPULAR PRICES— Regular rates, $4 per day up. Fifty rooms 
on the sixth floor with steam heat and electric light, reduced to 
$2 50 and $3 per day. Fifty rooms on other floors reduced from 
$4 to $3 50 per day. Parlors and alcove parlors at equally low 
rates. Special rates for the Army and Navy Officers and the 
Clergy. 



Occidental Hotel, 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, manager. 



San Francisco. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Dec. 30, 1895. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (1) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six months ending December 31, 1895, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and after January 2, 1896. ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending Deo. 31, 1895, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four and thirty-two one-hundredtns (4 32-100) per cent, per annum on 
term deposits and three and sixty one hundredths (3 60 100) per cent, per 
annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and afte. Wednes- 
day, January 1, 1896 Dividends not called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of dividend as the principal, from and after January 1, 1896. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 




GIGrtR. 



THE LATEST AND THE BEST BRAND OUT 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 



3 <*S @®«' 




DEAR EDITH. — With all the mad extravagance in dress 
this winter, there has begun a wild craze for jewels — 
especially diamonds. The other day it was announced that 
a large Anglo-French-American syndicate was trying to 
buy up all the loose diamonds in the world, but, undoubt- 
edly, the rumor was founded on the present enormous 
demand for them at home and abroad. The tiny watches 
pinned to gay corsages fairly blaze with sparkling gems of 
all colors of the rainbow — chiefly diamonds, however — make 
a resplendent decoration. There is always a dazzling pin 
above, from which they dangle by links of gems. In short, 
they resemble the imperial decorations of Austria or Spain 
more than any thing else one can think of at first sight. 

Rings are set with fifteen or twenty radiating and vary- 
ing colors in stones, arranged in a square block. The Mar- 
quise ring has in some way lost its vogue, although if it is a 
relic of one's ancestral jewels, it is in perfectly good form. 

It is a fad now, I am told in a New York letter, to follow 
a custom very swagger and appertaining to the haute 
noblesse of old Europe — to have a jeweled armorial ring. 
For instance, I saw one made in this city the other day to 
order by a prominent jewelry Arm. It was to be an 
engagement ring, and was really, to my mind, an odd and 
fantastic conceit. The club man who ordered it for his 
fiance's is of an old Boston family with a mellow old English 
pedigree and a coat-of-arms with many quarterings. 
However, his own family escutcheon reads: 

"On a Field Or, Three Lozenges, Azure." 

All of which means that on a shield of gold shall be pla ced 
three, blue gems — diamond shaped. 

The clubman's ring was fashioned thuswise: The little 
shield was in the form of the graceful Pavise, as it used to 
be called in the days of chivalry; which was a shield with 
an inward curve, wide at the top, and narrowing rapidly 
and gracefully to a sharp point at the bottom. This shield 
was constructed of plaip gold, with a narrow raised rim. 
Grouped in heraldic form were three beautiful amethysts, 
the bluest of the blue, cut diamond wise, only a narrow 
gold band with five stones of Beryl at intervals. 

These rings are extremely popular in London just now, 
as I hear is the goldsmith's and silversmith's art, and it 
has quickly reached New York and Boston. Young 
women of fashion and wealth amuse themselves at their 
leisure moments by fashioning dainty trinkets in the 
precious metals for their friends. They procure a dimin- 
utive forge and carry on the art in miniature. Some of 
the work is very creditable, and, at times, highly and 
veritably artistic. Miss de Hoghton, daughter of Sir H. 
de Hoghton, whose father is second in precedence in the 
English baronetcy, actually set the fashion in London 
society, and gradually it drifted over to Boston. 

But now of dress: The new striped glaci silks are mak- 
ing an immense hit. They come in red, black, brown and 
blue, and are very suitable for winter. 
. A pretty tailor-made cloth gown is of fancy knotted 
tweed, in reds or olive greens. The gored skirt is braided 
in a graceful design with black and gold braid. The jacket 
bodice, both in front and on the basque, is likewise 
trimmed, as well as the cuffs — » hi mousquetaire. The vest 
is of red velvet. The yoke effect is secured by braiding, 
which reaches to the red velvet epaulettes with scalloped 
edges. All in all, it is a mighty chic gown. Belinda. 

Electric Heating. — It is calculated that at the present 
time eleven times as much coal is required to generate 
electricity for heating a building as to produce steam for 
the same purpose. Under the most favorable auspices 
electric heating is twice as expensive as steam. 

The expensive and elaborate work necessary for the erection of 
the building and procuring a supply of fresh sea water daily for the 
Lurline Baths has been highly appreciated by the citizens of San 
Francisco. Here they can be accommodated with hot and cold salt 
water at any time in the day and enjoy a tub bath or a swim with- 
out going to the beach. The baths are situated on the corner of 
Bush and Larkin streets, in the very heart of the city. 




flsk' 
To 

S66 
Ttlulll. 



Guarantee a perfect fit and grace- 
ful appearance to any variety of 
figure, and are comfortable and 
durable. 

Made in short, long, extra long and 
extremely long waists; four, five, 
and six-hook clasps. 
We take pleasure in recommend- 
ing W. B., for the fit and wear of 
which we hold ourselves responsi- 
ble. We cheerfully and promptly furnish a new pair 
in all cases of dissatisfaction from any cause. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Las Angeles, Cal. 



MME. MflRGHftND'S GREME DE. Lfl GREME. 



A delightful preparation 
for preserving and beau- 
tifying the complexion. 

Awarded diploma at Me- 
chanics' Fair. 18SI5, for 
superior merit. 

Samples of Creme de la 
Creme given away. 



MME, MARGHAND, H»*r 

Rooms 30 lo 41 . 121 Post St. 
Send for booklet. 




Endorsed by 

W. T. W«nzell,M.D.. Ph.G. 

Ph.M. 
Wm, M. Searby, Ph.C. 
C F. Jones, Ph.C 
C. A. Clinion, M.D., ex- 
member Board of Health 
G. W Gerlach,Ph.G. M .D 
W M, Logan, Ph.G. M. D 
Dr Lichau, 

. Murphy, and others. 

and Complexion Specialist, 
Taber's entrance. Telephone 1349. 



Well 

Dressed 

Woman 



Should have 

Fashionable Modes, Well Fitting, 
Perfect in Workmanship and 
Elegant Finish. 

I [urnish these requisites. 

Mrs. A. J. Bradley, Modiste, 

313 Geary St , San Francisco. 



5RUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners, dyers, Hour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoo factories, 
stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F Tel. 5610. 



For the best value in 

HATS or CAPS 
Go to 

G. Herrmann & Go. 

Tne Hatters, 

328 Kearny St., 
Near Pine. (Entire Building) 

The ONLY Retail Hatters 
having their own factory. 




January ;j, 1896. 



IK VXCISCO NEWS 




C-rCiN 







IrEN wonder if toe &i Ins man ever thinks 

• 'f the enormous drain on vitality and longevity that the 
modem trained method entails, -;ns "An idler" in that 
bright Cycling .lour: 1 Wo hear of men 

ndition in a month or less. In 
condition for what? For an almost criminal expenditure 
of nervous energy, physical and mental, for the violent 
and spasmodic over exertion "f all the most important 
muscles and vital organs, for the suicidal exactions on 
functions which it is crime to stimulate and over excite. 
Life is measured by heart beats, and to accellerate their 
time is to encourage dissolution. A barrel is emptied just 
in chronological proportion as to whether the leaking 
drops drip slowlv or fast. Physiologists fix the life period 
of professional athletes as being under forty years — com- 
monly thirty-five or six. Is the evanescent glory of winning 
a (10 race — or an ephemeral record even less valuable — 
worth the loss of two score years at the best end of life? 

Ida Trafford Bell, in the ^Yheelwomau, says: " Human 
beings are like animals. Cage them and they become ugly 
but give them such freedom as nature intended, and the 
animal, which in a hot, artificial atmosphere will attempt 
your life, wili, under natural conditions, be your friend and 
playfellow. So with woman. Burden and harass her with 
a thousand petty cares, keep her shut up day after day 
within the walls of her home, and you will soon begin to 
wonder why some women have such awful impossible dis- 
positions, and feel sorry for the husband who prefers his 
club, and the children who prefer the streets to home. 
Such women are not fit to train children, and yet in this 
country they are the rule rather than the exception." 

Bicycling as a means of restful exercise now scarcely 
needs to be pointed out. As a woman said lately: "The 
beauty of the wheel's cure of insomnia, incipient nervous 
prostration, and the rest of the ills of the overworked is 
that it cures in spite of unfaith, want of skill or any handi- 
cap. You get on your wheel, and there is no getting away 
from it; it must absorb your attention; you cannot worry 
about the children, the house, the office, finances — any of 
your cares — you have got to think about your poise on the 
wheel and watch your surroundings, and in so doing you 
get out of yourself in spite of yourself. Every physician 
will tell you that this is all that is needed." And this is 
the secret of the whole thing. 

A Parisian fashion writer says: "Except for park- 
cycling the only fit material for costumes is woolen. This 
cyclist departure for women is opening a wide field to the 
knitter. Pyrenean wool is lighter than Shetland, and is 
greatly used in waistcoats and summer cycling jackets. 
The Pyrenean women give touches of fancy and brightness 
to these garments which remind one of the costumes of 
professional Spanish bull-fighters." 

Screwing and unscrewing nuts and bolts never benefits 
a machine. Loosen and alter them only when it is abso- 
lutely necessary for you to do so. See.that both are at all 
times kept screwed ' up tightly. Failure to do this may 
result in injury to both the machine and yourself. 



First Traveler — While in Africa I faced two lions, a 
tiger and three elephants, in the same jungle, and I'm 
alive yet. Second Traveler— Huh! That's nothing. 
"While in Texas I bowed to a girl that three Mexicans were 
in love with. — New York Weekly. 



The wise man of the world, who knows more things than he com- 
monly talks about, is a genial, tolerant soul, who wants to enjoy the 
same freedom that he cheerfully extends to others. When he wants 
a drink he takes it like a gentleman, and being a connoisseur, he 
drinks only that which is good for him. For this reason he calls for 
Argonaut whiskey, and makes sure that he is getting the genuine 
article. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, are the agents for this 
popular and wholesome article. 




©) BICYCLES 



HOOKER & GO. 

16-18 Dru mm St, 

RETAIL STORt: 

1640 Market St. 



,/ WHITER 

' RIMMED \) 

Hummer 




CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE ' 

RESTAURANTS. 
Montgomery-St. Coffee and Lunch House. Good coffee and fresh eggs 
a specialty. Cream waffles. 42ti Montgomery St. H H. HJUL, Prop. 

Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 
dining and banquet rooms. Tel. 429. A. B Blanco & B. Bruno, Props. 

Nevada Restaurant, A\1 Pine st. Private rooms; meals 50c. Lotjpy Bros 

Bay State Oyster House. I5Stockton& lOOO'Farrell. N. M. Adler.Prop. 

MEDICAL. 

A Sovereign Remedy— DR. PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 

One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. Try it. Price 25c. 

George Dahlbender & Co., 214 Kearny Btreet. 
Dr. R. Elmer Bunker has removed to 630 Sutter street. 

Office Hours : 1 to 3 and 6 :30 to 7 :30 P. M. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Thomas L. HIM, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows' Building, southwest corner Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours : 4 to 5. 
Dr. H. G. Young, 

Bridges and teeth without plates. 1841 Polk street. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 
Neuhaus &. Co., 115 Kearny, up-stairs. Suits to order $12 50. Over- 
coats, $10- Pants $4 aDd upwards. Samples by mail. 
fl®*A perfect fit guaranteed. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 
Joseph Greven, Vocal Teacher, Neumann Piano Store, 82 Ninth St., S. F. 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a uox of ROBERTS' Best. 



ON WHEELS. 



6. &S. 



AXLE GREASE. 



HOME PRODUCTION. 

GOBURN, TEV1S & GO., 107 Front St. 



Does your 



Roof Need Repair? 

We will examine It without cost, and give 
estimate for putting in. good order, and 
keeping it so for a term of years. 

Paraffine Paint Co. F^fee^eeT"' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 




IN a family living not far from James street an amusing 
incident happened the other day. The family includes 
a little boy about ten years of age. During the conversa- 
tion at the dinDer table he used some bad language. His 
mother naturally reproved him severely for it. "Why, 
Shakespeare uses those words," exclaimed the lad. "Well, 
then, you musn't play with Shakespeare any more," was 
the prompt and cautious reply of the horrified mother. — 
Syracuse Post. 

Mrs. Jolliboy — My husband takes regular exercise at 
the club gymnasium now, and I judge from what he says 
that he is getting on finely. Mrs. Kingsley — Has he be- 
come expert enough to do anything? Mrs. Jolliboy — He 
tells me that he has learned how to crook his elbow, though 
I don't know what that means exactly. — Detroit Free 
Press. 

The teacher was asking questions — teachers are quite 
apt to ask questions, and they sometimes receive curious 
answers. The question was as follows: "Now, pupils, 
how many months have twenty-eight days?" "All of them, 
teacher," replied the boy on the front seat. — Utica Ob- 
server. 

Herr Becker — Marie, it strikes me you waste a lot of 
precious time with your poodle. Frau Becker — Poor 
creature! I often feel sorry for him. He has no club to 
go to of an evening and amuse himself four or five hours at 
a stretch. — Deutscher Soldatenhort. 

Harqraves — You know that time I was so sick last 
summer? I just heard that the doctor gave me up once. 
Ferry — I heard that he gave you up twice. "Twice?" 
"Yes. The second time after he had been trying to col- 
lect his bill." — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Husband (shaving) — Confound the razor I Wife — What's 
the matter now? You're dreadfully cross-tempered. Hus- 
band — The razor is so infernally dull. Wipe — Dull? Why, 
I ripped up an old skirt with it yesterday, and it cut beau- 
tifully. — Chicago Record. 

Bobby — Popper, what does the paper mean by the 
women of the hour? Mr. Ferry — I guess it means the 
woman who says she will be ready to start in 15 minutes. 
An hour is about as near as she comes to it usually. — Cin- 
cinnati Enquirer. 

Mrs. Henry Peck — Bah ! I only married you because 
I pitied you when nobody else thought anything about you. 
Mr. Henry Peck — Ah, well, my dear, everybody pities 
me now. — Punch. 

Mrs. Waggles — Doesn't your husband suffer dreadfully 
with rheumatism? Mrs. Wiggles — Yes, but it's nothing 
to what the rest of us have to endure. — Sommerville Jour- 
nal. 

Miss Gush — Oh, Captain, were you ever boarded by a 
pirate? Captain Storms— Yes. He charged me $11 a 
day for a hall room on the fourth floor. — Cleveland World. 

Prospective Tenant — But we wish to keep a servant. 
Landlord op Flat — Oh, very well. I will have an alcove 
painted on the wall of the kitchen. — Detroit Tribune. 

She — Have you seen that mannish Miss Strider in bloom- 
ers ? He — No. She — It's awful; she raises her hat now 
when she meets women in skirts! — Exchange. 

" Er — I want some sort of a present for a young lady.'' 
"Sweetheart or sister?" "Er — why — she hasn't said 
which she will be yet." — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Agatha — Charley is tickled with his new mustache, isn't 
he? Marie— Yes, but (with a sly blush) not half as much 
as I am. — New York World. 

Dolly de Mure — Charlie Smoothe was trying to kiss 
me behind the screen. Clara Caustic — I wondered why 
you were so quiet. — Truth. 



BANKING. 



The Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 
Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits, 11,181,910 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, "Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta 
coma, Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— Firs t Na tional Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October 1, 1894). . 3.158,129 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. . Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.) — 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India — Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1895 $24,202,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 
F" Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 8:30 to 8. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve $375,000 

San Francisco Office — 424 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St. 
Portland Branch— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
Taooma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER | Ass't Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan* Co. Boston— Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sctter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 1 Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

Reserve Fund (800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits issued. 



SIG. GREENBAUM 1 „„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHTJL } Managers. 



CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital (1,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansomb Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 I Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 f Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) ManfteprR 

p. n. lilienthal; Mana s erB - 



January 15, 189*. 



I K \Ni IS* < ■ XI \\ - : 



H 



POKER DOS 

The 
fr. mil ii|)oii 



( a chair. 

living wl .I this ni 

■f them are in the pa 

deal the otl 

r\g an extrenu habit, it a 

n ami oftentimes sudden death. 

Don't put all the 1 have in the center "f the 

for a bluff anil then try !" pull them bark suddenly if 
- you. People have been severely injured 
fordoing thi> very thing. 

Don't open a jackpot with a pair of trey?.. Some players 
who have done this thing in a thoughtless moment are 
alive ami well, others are in the hospital, and not a fen- 
have left this vain world entirely. 

Don't, when playing with strangers, ask permission to 
examine their inside pockets and look up their sleeves for 
a cold deck. Such a proceeding is very rude and ungentle- 
manly, and might cause some one to rise-up-Willie-Riley 
and smite you athwart the cheek. 

Don't get angry when some one calls you and discovers 
that you have been talking eagerly with nothing in your 
hand save a flush that has the spring-half at one end. 
According to Hoyle. the rule in this case is to smile 
blandly, excuse yourself politely, retire into the hall and 
fall carelessly out of the second-story window. 

Don's get excited and say unkind things when every- 
body passes out just wheu you have four aces. The proper 
caper under such circumstances is to slip the four 
aces up your sleeve and await a more favorable opportun- 
ity. If any of the other players should notice this action, 
however, apologize profusely and mention that you mis- 
took your sleeve for the deck. They look very much alike, 
anyhow. 

Don't forget to look carefully at your cards before bet- 
ting everything you have on earth. It is very embarrass- 
ing to find that you have a gold brick straight after you 
have bet all your goods and chattels on its being strictly 
up to date. Cavendish says that when you make a break 
of this kind the rule is to bid the other players good night 
in a quiet, gentlemanly manner, and then go out and allow 
a policeman to kick you hurriedly around the block. — New 
York World. 



PECULIARITIES OF LIGHTNING. 



PERSONS struck by lightning have had small holes 
drilled in the skull, but otherwise they were not 
marked. Victims have been horribly burned, and even 
dismembered. A stroke of lightning has cut off a man's 
ear, or shaved his hair and beard clean, and not hurt him 
in any other way. The markings are often curious. 
Blue is the common color, but they have been red, green, 
and black, and occasionally the whole body turns black. 
Negroes who have been struck by lightning have had 
their skin bleached in spots to absolute whiteness. One 
negro struck by lightning found, after he had recovered 
consciousness, that he had one completely white arm, the 
rest of his body being as black as usual. Blindness, deaf- 
ness, and either total or partial paralysis, are frequent 
consequences of lightning strokes. Sometimes the light- 
ning selects a single object on a man's person, and assails 
that without apparently touching the man himself. Coins 
have been melted until they stuck together in a man's 
pocket, whilst he suffered no ill consequences. Keys, 
watches and watch-chains, metal cartridges, and eye- 
glass frames have been more or less damaged, whilst the 
persons wearing them were almost uninjured. Clothing, 
too, has been almost demolished without injury to its 
wearer. Iron tacks have been pulled out of shoes, and 
rubber boots destroyed frequently. The brass eyelets 
were once torn out of a man's shoes, but he hardly felt the 
shock. 



Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething 



•Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" tor your 



BANKING. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

OutruKw.1 . . . . 

JAMKS 11 l-ill ! 

H"" 1 -' in. HiiIkti Mi 

. hariKC 
Banks. Wlin 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. B. I ' IIKBTS. 

Cash Capital and Surpltu (fi.iVl.oa) 

John J. Valontlnc maarS.Klns Manager 

H. Wadsworth 1 1 [ant Oaahlor 

BRANl 

X. V City, 11 11 Pai e City, .1. B. Iv~.lv.' 

John .1 vafi 1 1 Idridgo, Henrj 

E. Huntington. Homer S King, I rgl • K. Gray, John J. McCook. 01 

F. Crocker. Dudley Evans. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000 

Successor to Satber ft Co., Established [SI, Ban Fram 
.Tames K. Wilson President. C. F. A TALBOT, Vloe Prestdenl 

L. I. Cowgill. Cashier. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, Charles Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller. 
Wm. P. Johnson, C. F. A. Talbot. James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drcxrl, Morgan ft Co. Bostou--Downer ft Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics" Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes ft Co. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $1,000,000. Reserve Fund 8 715,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1895, $30,727,581} 50. Guaranteed Capital. .$1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, B. A. Becker; Vice-President, Edward Kruse; 
Second Vice-President,. George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H.R.Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board of Directors — Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS. 
Wm. Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Lincoln. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND Secretary 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100.000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Franoisoo 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 San&ome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

O A T E N T S . AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PATENTS. 

B00NE> & MURDOGK, (E. F. Murdock. Jno. L. Boone). 
San Francisco Office: Nucleus Building, Cor. Market and Third Sts. 
Washington Offtce : Opposite Patent Office. 




REMOVED TO 824 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING 




SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January *5« '896. 



■ 
re without 

iO 

itset Thi 

1 and 

ate 

1 

1 uis bospi- 

kmtly si 

tor tni : Danish 

A S 

ith si\ of aotk 
naonj ftfti 1 

js1 ;i* 
in as fine a polisl 

. - tin- 

r 

1 from the 



Lais is 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents. 
309 and 311 Sansomc St .... San Francisco. C« 

KINDLAY, DURHAM S HHOD1E 4S and (KiTtiroadnowdlt' St . Lundoa 

i'Vi IX)... pSovtl 



INSURANCE. 



, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Fireman's Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY. OF SAN KRANC1SOU, CAL 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets. $3,000,000. 

PHENIX INS. CO. OF BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

■ Ml.CH 

THE AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Sum 

PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

AjMtl 0H.TS Sun ■ 1W4S8 

THE SVEA FIRE INS. CO. OF GOTHENBURG 

Sure 
BROWN. CRAIG & CO.. Mji... 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Llmltud), OK MANCII1 LAND. 

SOLIO SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CI1AS A. LATON. Manager 439 Calltornla Si., B 

fihb inn 



CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid D| i 

Surplus 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. P. Agents. JOl Monty. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OK AI I'KLLE. GERMANY Established 1H 

Capital I.'.'J&.i.lKjc. Total Asisfla, te.KM.OM 6S 

UNITED STATE EPARTMKNT: «« Sanaome Si 

YOSS. CONRAD & CO.. General Managera. 



PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON K '""" 1 "'>«> ■«• 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. i»«p«i- "» 

HUTLEH & HALDAN. General Af 

413 California St . B. P. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

tip UVKBF 

capital ,. ie,7uu.i«l 

UAI THR1E & CO., Ag. 

No SUCalltorulaM , S F. 



The Grand Canyon Line ! — To the East. 

rlaodEiourei I ftPOPflP F W/\\\ 

. Manager UUUI yU Li I 1 CI 1 1 y 

•rtbe 

full |'ii' l. 0. r. A.. '.II Market St.. Chronicle 

lUillJmc San Kniv 






FOREIGN WINES. 

L LIKE BUILDING, BK Sanson 



Januar 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 1.1. i 



»3 



YVETTE GUILBERT. 

O, ftiri ol Tilian-Unted li»ir. 

- like stars and shoulders rare. 
Ke 

veil 

On 

bear — 
( >, maid of gifts beyond compare, 
<>. sunbeam, dl-aipating care, 
Yee 

vav 

i ; will 

bare — 
O, songstress 9ad, demure and pert, 
With whose nomenclature we flirt, 
\\v 

vett 

Oil 

bert— 
We love you even when you sneer 
At sentiment! the world holds dear. 
Yiv 

velt 

Gib 

beer. 
But, siren of the Titian hair, 
Y'ou drive us frantic with dispair: 
Your Dame would make an angel swear — 
Of which no doubt you are aware 
And not a continental care — 
Yvette 

Guil 

bert. 
— Dramatic News. 



THERE are some curious anomalies in the present game 
law of California, and it is likely that the Supreme 
Court will some day be called upon to decide as to its 
constitutionality. The shooting of quail, ducks and geese 
is unlawful except between the 15th of October and the 
15th of February, while it is unlawful to sell or expose for 
sale such game except between the 15th of November and 
the 15th of January. Thus for two months in which game 
may be lawfully shot it may not be lawfully sold. This 
would seem to the lay mind to involve an interference with 
the rights of property. What a man may lawfully possess, 
one would suppose, he may lawfully sell, unless it be some- 
thing whose sale may be prohibited on moral grounds, such 
as opium or spirits. The law, as it stands, discriminates 
unfairly in favor of the sportsman against the mass of the 
people who cannot afford the luxury of gunning, and who 
must perforce either buy game or go without it. 

THE world of letters knows that the moral tone of Mr. 
Austin's works has had more to do with his elevation to 
the Laureateship than his poetry. As a poet he is not to 
be compared with Swinburne, but the English people could 
not afford to have the author of " Poems and Ballads " in 
the Laureate's chair, even if he has repented of his earlier 
errors. Mr. Austin is sixty years of age, and a Conser- 
vative, which, no doubt, also helped him to get his promo- 
tion. 

TWO pages of a manuscript poem in the handwriting of 
Chatter ton were recently purchased for the Bristol 
Library for seventy pounds. There is no doubt about the 
genuineness of the manuscript, and the poem, " Kew 
Gardens," was first published in 1837. 

Charitable Old Gentleman — Why don't you work. 
Work makes life sweet. Beggar — Sorry, sir; I get tooth- 
ache if I take anything sweet. — Humoristische Blatter. 

Interested Stranger — What is the trouble with the 
baby, sir? Papa — Blest if I know, except that it doesn't 
seem to be his lungs. — Puck. 



Scars may be removed or made less conspicuous by 

a daily application of hot olive oil, rubbing the oil into the 
skin with the tips of the fiugers. 



He that swells in prosperity will be sure to sink in 

adversity. — Colton. 



THERE is a child like simplicity in the faith manifested 
by mass meel ■ ..f trade, 

chambers of commerce and other t»>.ii«>. which aolemnly 
adopt long-windi ■• "memorials," addn 

to the Congress of the United States, The waste-basket 

natural destination of all such wearisome rul 
A memorial or sel of resolutions from such Bources lias no 
more effect upon legislation at Washington than upon the 
Bow of the < ; nlf stream. The River Improvement Conven 
tion, which closed its labors here hist week, followed the 
farcical custom of addressing a long memorial to Congress, 
but ii is certain thai 11 California wants favor in the next 
river and harbor bill, it will takea hard week at Washing- 
ton to win it. 



It has been cl umed that tobacco is one of the prime 

causes of color blindness. In positions where it is neces- 
sary to distinguish colors its use should be avoided. 

The bottoms of iron ships are now being sheathed 

with copper, by galvanic deposition, in the same manner 
that knives, forks and spoons arc silver plated. 

An ill wind that blows nobody good — the breath of 

scandal. 



Few know what chimneys 
to use on their lamps. Con- 
sult the "Index to Chimneys," 
sent free. 

Write Ceo A Macbeth Co, 
Pittsburgh, Pa, maker of 
"pearl glass" and "pearl top." 



Jf?<? ?o!oi>iaI, 



Pine and Jones Sts. 



The leading and finest Family Hotel in San Francisco. 
The cuisine is the pride of the hostess. 
Elegantly furnished and sunny apartments, single or en 
suite, with or without hath, 

To see the interior in its beauty and. with all its accom- 
modations means to locate permanently. 



SPECIAL RATES 



lo permanent guests. Billiard Room, Elevator. 
(Jouvetiicat lo all cars. 

MRS. S B. JOHNSON,. 

Southeast corner nf Tine and Jones streets. 



California .Hotel 



Is the only MODERN FIRE-PROOF Hotel in San 

Francisco. 

Its rich and brilliant furnishings and finish 

will please the 
its Table will tickle the f/inf a 

bClSbO, 

a " c,, " gesp ' o,eo ' lta D06K6tD00K 

of every Guest. Convenient to business centers. 
Close to all car lines. Every room sunny. 

R. tl. War-field, Proprietor, 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 




mm" , 



dE^fi; 



THIS week has been the liveliest since Christmas in 
society life, and the indications are that the ball will 
be kept roiling merrily from now on until Lent comes upon 
the scene. Theatre parties were more numerous on Mon- 
day night than for several weeks past; the Olympics had 
a crowded audience at the Columbia, and, the Baldwin 
being out of the line, the California was well patronized. 
The Monday Evening Club gave their monthly dance at 
Golden Gate Hall; several dinner parties preceded it, and 
the party was very successful. Tuesday eveniug's hop at 
the Presidio was, as usual, delightful. Wednesday was 
largely given over to dinners, and Mrs. Boardman gave a 
whist party, on Thursday evening there was a dance at 
the Hotel Oliver, and last night Ed. Greenway led the 
cotillion of the Friday Fortnightlies, at Lunt's Hall. To- 
day at Mrs. Jewett's, Miss O'Connell will give the third of 
her recitals, which will be entitled: "The Maids and 
Matrons of the Revolution," and the fancy dress dinner at 
Mrs. PaulJarboe'swill be the novelty of the week; tableaux 
and dancing will fill in the evening hours, to which quite a 
number of additional guests have been asked, Miss Kate 
Jarboe and her /'«/«<■, Mr. Bull, being the especial guests of 
the affair. The Partington studio has been muchly sought 
this week, and the display made by the Guild of Arts and 
Crafts pronounced to be interesting, instructive, and a 
remarkably fine one. 

The young ladies had several causes for complaint 
regarding their Leap Year Cotillion last Friday night. 
The navy°chaps were among the missing, and the night 
proved to be not alone the first wet one the club has had 
this winter for their re-unions, but absolutely the most 
inclement of the season so far. The storm had but slight 
effect upon the attendance, which was among the largest 
the club has ever had; the young ladies who officiated as 
leaders, Miss Sallie Maynard, in white, Miss Emily Hager, 
in pink, and Miss Sara Collier, in blue, were warmly com- 
plimented upon their success as such, and, though none of 
the figures were new, they were all pretty and well 
executed. 

There were several gatherings on Saturday, aud, in 
spite of the very threatening state of the weather, none of 
the hostesses had cause to complain. At Mrs. Jewett's 
the second of Miss Lilian O'Conneu's recitals was given, 
her theme being, "Through Colonial Doorways," with 
musical selections by Miss Adler. The house warming 
reception given by Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Mann, at their 
handsome new home on Washington street, was a charm- 
ing affair. In the afternoon it took the form of a musicale 
tea, when a large number of their friends were present. 
In the evening music was again the feature of the enter- 
tainment, to which only a few of their more intimate friends 
were bidden, a delicious supper capping the climax of 
their enjoyment. The Misses Smith gave a tea also on 
Saturday last at the parental residence, on Webster and 
Broadway. 

The wedding of Miss Rose Walter and Abe Miertief, the 
anticipation of which has been for weeks stirring our Jew- 
ish elite, took place on last Tuesday evening at the home 
of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. N. Walter, on 
Van Ness avenue, and brated with unusual splen- 

dor. The Walter residence is one of the most spacious in 
the city, and on tin was thrown open to the 

guests, adorned with all the decorative skill for which 
Miss Mary Bat' ■ corps of assistants are noted. 

Flowers b used in profusion, the 

chief point ol interest centerin the reception room, 

where the bridal bo shioned in the corner bay 

window, of bamboo poles, .' ,; . flowers, satin ribbons aDd 
gauze, from the center of which hung, not the usual wel- 
ding bell, but an antique 1 lamp, an heirloom in the 



family for over two hundred years, a bright star shining 
from it with brilliant effect. The pink brocaded satm 
walls of this beautiful apartment served as a bright back- 
ground for large wreaths of white pinks and satin ribbons. 
Between this room and the adjoining library Miss Bates' 
favorite fret-work was introduced in the doorway, com- 
posed of almond blossoms and pink ribbons, a darker shade 
of plum colored and white ribbons being used for the door- 
way into the hall. The library was a wealth of bloom, 
flowers in baskets, which were artistically arranged on 
the bookshelves; the music room was in white and gold, 
ribbon bow knots, and green garlands; on one side of the 
room a charming conceit was the hanging of the number- 
less congratulatory telegrams, received by the happy 
couple, on a silken cord, so that actually "all who ran 
could read." The hall was exceedingly effective in its 
trimming of dark green foliage and bunches of bright 
marigolds and red peppers tied with yellow ribbons. 
Amid all this fragrance flitted gaily dressed guests, mak- 
ing the scene brilliant in the extreme. At half-past eight 
o'clock the strains of the wedding march gave notice of 
the approach of the bridal party, and shortly after the 
cortege appeared, passed through the hall to the recep- 
tion room, and took their places in the lovely bridal 
bower, where the Rev. Rabbi Voorsanger awaited them. 
The four ushers, Messrs. H. D. Walter, Albert Frank, I. 
W. Hellman, Jr., and Isadore Fleishman, led the way; 
then came Mrs. Walter, the mother of the bride, and 
William Haas; the groom was next with his sister, Mrs. 
Baruch, and then appeared the pretty maid-of-honor, 
Miss Alice Greenebaum; last of all the fair bride, leaning 
upon her father's arm. Her rich brunette beauty never 
showed to greater advantage than in her beautiful bridal 
robe of ivory white satin, which fell in lustrous folds round 
her girlish figure, the corsage one mass of embroidery 
done in seed pearls, with point lace reveres; a tulle vail 
and bouquet of natural orange blossoms completed her 
costume. Miss Alice Greenebaum, the, sole bridesmaid, 
wore a lovely gown of pure white silk and tulle; she car- 
ried white roses in her bouquet. The sister of the bride, 
Mrs. Moses Heller, wore a superb gown of yellow satin; 
Mrs. Walter's gown was of rich black velvet, with front of 
white satin embroidered in gold. She also wore magnifi- 
cent diamonds. The groom's sister, Mrs. Baruch, wore a 
gown of rose brocade and point lace, a very stylish and 
effective costume. The marriage ceremony ended, con- 
gratulations were offered, and supper was served later. 
The decorations of the supper room were in green, ferns 
aud smilax predominating; innumerable lamps added to 
the brilliancy of the scene. Dancing was resumed after 
the feast and kept up long after the bridal pair had de- 
parted. The presents were some of the most valuable and 
profuse ever bestowed upon a bride in our city. 

During the first week in February St. Luke's Church 
will be the scene of two society weddings — that of Miss 
Isabella Grant and E. D. Pond will be an evening cere- 
mony, taking place at 8:30 p. M. on Monday, the 3rd; 
while Miss Kate Jarboe's nuptials with J. Case Bull will be 
celebrated at noon on Thursday, the 6th. 

Among the engagement announcements of the week are 
those of Miss Mattie Whittier and W. B. Weir, of New 
York; Miss Blanche Castle and Charles Farquharson; Miss 
Millie Greenebaum and Dr. Herbert W. Hatch. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Georgia M. Wight- 
man, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Wightman, Jr., to 
Mr. Douglass B. Crane of the Occidental & Oriental Steam- 
ship Company. 

The fancy dress ball which will be given at the Art Instit- 
ute on California street on Mardi Gras is another charming 
event to look forward to, and if it proves half as pleasant 
as some of its predecessors under the same auspices, it 
will be a very delightful one indeed. The Deux Temps 
Club of Oakland are also meditating something upon the 
same lines, to take place ere the season closes. The 
Saturday Morning Orchestra are down on the cards for a 
concert at the Christian Association Auditorium on the 
evening of Monday, February 16th. Their efforts have al- 
ways been in the cause of charity and it is understood that 
at the coming event they themselves will be the 
beneficiaries. 



January 25, 1896. 



FRANCISCO SI-WS 



Mr- 
them, 
Mr Jim Phetaa 

■ 

Is at the dinner given by Mrs. Montford W 
'. Fred Crocker - is in honor of Mr .1 

•t, who has uppnrenth found it difficult to tear him 
self away from toe S km Knight, 

Mrs Henry Scott, Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Yon Scbroeder, Mrs 
Hopkins, Mrs Eager and Mrs Tevis also appeared in the 
Mrs H Greenebaum and Mrs 
I. N. Walter have also given elaborate dinners in honor of 
the recently engaged couple. Miss Stella Greenebaum and 
Simon, whose marriage will be an event of the near 
future. 

At the second of the Colonial Recitals which Miss Lilian 

nell is giving under Mrs J. H. Jowett's auspices, a 

large audience, gazing "Through Colonial Doorways," saw 

lusly gowned figure of Lady Stuyvesant, wife of 

OVernor of : New Amsterdam, standing in an antique 
drawing-room. The subject of the recital, the gay life in 
New York under the Dutch, and afterward under the 
British rule, was amusingly treated, as was the aristo- 
cratic regime in Virginia under the great Proprietors. 
Miss O'Connell's best work, however, was in her rendering 
of Celia Thaxter's weird poem. " The Cruise of the 'Mys- 
tery, 1 " (a slave ship), which held the audience spell-bound 
by its tragic realism. A dainty ballad composed in the 
fifteenth century, and exquisitely sung by Miss Adler, 
added to the enjoyment of the occasion. 

There are many pleasant affairs on the programme for 
next week, chief among them the dominoparty which Colonel 
and Mrs. George H. Burton intend giving in the hop room 
at the Presido on Wednesday evening. Domino parties 
are a great pleasure to the ladies, but it is a mooted point 
whether the men find them equally so, being, as they are, 
so completely at the mercy of the fair sex. This one will 
take the form of a cotillion, which will be led by Miss 
Minnie Burton. On Friday night the last dance of the 
Friday Night Cotillion Club will take place at Odd 
Fellows' Hall; it will be an assembly. At the Maple Hall 
of the Palace the Entre Nous Club will give their Leap 
Year Cotillion. 

At the annual meeting of the Mizpah, held Monday after- 
noon, the following officers were chosen for the new year: 
Mrs. Harry Clarke, President; Mrs. W. O. Farnsworth, 
Vice President; Mrs. T. J. Schuyler, Recording Secretary; 
Miss M. L. Elliott, Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. B. 
Day, Treasurer. The report of the Secretary showed 
that during the last year committees had made seventy- 
four visits to the needy, twenty-six families had been as- 
sisted, and 195 garments made for different charitable in- 
stitutions. The Mizpah is the charitable clubof the Western 
Addition, is doing a vast deal of good, and is in a flourish- 
ing condition. 

The Entre Nous Cotillion will give a Fancy Dress Leap 
Year german on next Friday evening, at the Palace 
Hotel. Miss Nancy Place will act as leader, assisted by 
Mrs. Frank L. Piatt and Misses Charlotte Gruenhagen 
and Mae B. Ludlow. It promises to be one of the most 
successful and brilliant gatherings of the season. 

Mrs. McCutcheon's progressive euchre party and the 
McBean theatre and supper party have been among recent 
pleasant affairs. 

On Tuesday evening January 28th, Mrs. B. W. Paulsen 
will leave on the Sunset Limited train for New York. 



HON. D. T. Cole has now been a member of the State 
Board of Harbor Commissioners for three years, and his 
vigilance and energy in office have proved a pleasant sur- 
prise to those who first were his rivals, and at the same time 
fulfilled the hopes completely of his host of friends. Mr. 
Cole is a staunch Republican in politics, and came to this 
State in pioneer days. A thorough business man, he is 
especially regarded by merchants and shippers for his 
hearty endeavor to improve the condition of our water 
front. As a prominent member of the well-known firm of 
Moore, Hunt & Co., he is an important figure in our busi- 
ness community. 

™ — - 1 l -- ' 



Ki 
I to 

Bow 

the I'nitcd Stat r a field I of such Kates Our 

Kat' b ., and our Jam 9 are much 

more blushing. ■ much the younger. KaU 

squaller from stormville, and the will not sojourn long in 

in Short, one of I 

Sams men who happened to be a woman. A know 1 
of Kate Field and Joaquin Miller ought to decrease the 
annexation sentiment In Dm- Islands. But. fortunately. Pres- 
ident Dole is one of Uncle Sam's nephews, and knows, 
from immed e ot knowledge, thai the relative 

drawbacks are not numerous, and that Kate and Joaquin 
areno tative people, and do not express a Con 

otiment. 



RUSSIA, whose calendar is twelve days behindours, 
pro], uses to change thi Gregorian calendar after the 
beginning of the new century. The authorities have not 

yet derided whether to jump over the thirteen days at 
once or to accomplish their object gradually by omitting 
the first twelve leap years of the century. 



IT is my opinion that a man's soul may be buried and 
perish under a dung-heap, or in a furrow of the field, 
just as well as under a pile of money," said Nathaniel 
Hawthorne. 



The Care of Tooth-brushes. — The care of tooth- 
brushes is not sufficiently observed. In our city houses, a 
writer properly remarks, they stand in their cups or hang 
on their racks above the set toilet-bowls day and night, 
absorbing any disease germs that may be floating about. 
They should be washed frequently — at least about twice a 
week — in some antiseptic solution, strong salt and water 
or bicarbonate of sodium and water being two good and 
readily provided cleansers. Tooth washes and pastes 
should also be kept carefully covered. 



According to Galton, the patterns ou the finger 

tips are not only unchangeable through life, but the chance 
of the finger prints of two persons being alike is less than 
one chance in 64,000,000. 

Cream of Orange Blossoms, creates spotless complexions. 60 cents, 
druggists or by mull. Pacific Perfumery Company, San Francisco. 



Ooopkh & Co., artstationers and heraldic engravers, 746 Market St. S.F 







The modern oxygen cure for 

disease. 

Watson & Co. 



Pacific Coast Agents : 

124 MARKET ST. 
Send for circulars. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1896. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 
SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. | From November 90, t8$s, \ Arrive 

6:30 a Haywards, Niles, and Way Sta- 
tions 10:15 A 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:4o p 
7:00a Benicia, Vaoaville, Kumsey, Sac- 
ramento, and Redding, via Davis 7:15 P 
7:30 A Martinez. San Ramon, Napa.Cal- 

istoga, and Santa Rosa 6:15 P 

8:30a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysvillc, Red 
Bluff, Sundays excepted Oroville 4:15p 

•8:30 a Peters and Milton *7:15P 

9:00 a San Leandro Haywards and Way 

Stations 1 1 :45 A 

9:00A Los Angeles Express, Raymond, 
{for Yosemite), Santa Barbara, 

and Los Angeles 4:45 P 

9:00 A Martinez and Stockton 10:45 a 

10:00 a San Leandro, Haywards, Niles... 1:45 p 
12:00m San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations .2:45 p 

1:00 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore. . . 8:45 a 

*1 :00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

t! :30 P Port Costa and Way Stations .... t? :45 P 
3:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 5 :45 p 

4 :<i0 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations ■ ■ ■ 6 :45 P 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9 :15 a 

4:00 p Benicia, Esparto, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 

Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45 a 

4:30p Niles, San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7:15 P 

5:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8 :45 P 

3:30p New Orleans Express, Fresno, 
Bakerstield, Santa Barbara, Los 
Angeles, Deming. El 'Paso. New 

Orleans, and East 10:45 A 

3:30 P SantaFe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojave and East 10:45 A 

6:00 P European mail, Ogden and East. . 0:45 a 
6:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose. ., 7:45 a 

J7 :00 P Vallejo t? :45 p 

7:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and Eas t 10 :45 a 

7:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10:50p 

9:00 p San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations ttl2 :00 a 

H10:05p "Sunset Limited," Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans 

and East. \ 13 :45 P 

ttll:15p San Leandro, Haywards and 
Way Stations 7 :15 a 

Santa Croz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:!5a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
F ic ) .HoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 
and way stations 5:50 P 

•3:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Feltou, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations •11:20 .a 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9:50 A 

til :45p Hunters' Excursion San Jose and 

W a y Stations '. 17 :S0 p 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:45 A San Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only 1 :45 p 

8:15 a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe and prin- 
cipal way stations 7 :05 P 

10:40A San Jose and way stations 5:00 P 

11 :45 a Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

•2:30 P San Jose, Gilroy. Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10 :40 A 

•3:30 P San Jose and principal way sta- 
tions ' 9:47 a 

•4 :30 P San Jose and Way Stations *8 :06 A 

5:30 p San Jose and way stations *8:48a 

6:30 p San Jose and way stations 6:86 a 

til :45p San Jose and way stations f7:45 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 
(Slip8). 

•7:15. 9:00, and 11:00 a. m., 11:00, *2:00, 13:00, 
•4:00, 15:00 and *6:00p. m. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broad v 

♦8:00,8:00, 10:00 a. M.; $12:00, *1:00, 12:00, 
♦3:00,14:00 *5:00P. M. 

A for Morning. p for Afu-rnoon. 

•Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

ISundaysonly. ^Tuesdays and Saturdays. 

tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 
gSundays and Thursdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



WISE AND OTHERWISE. 

Refinement that carrie3 us away from 
our fellowraen is not God's refinement.— 
JBeecher. 

No rock so hard but that a little wave 
may beat admission in a thousand years.— 
Tennyson. 

"Onesoweth and another reapelh" is a 
verity that applies to evil as well as good.— 
George Eliot. 

I take it to be a principal rule of life not 
to be too much addicted to any one thing. 
—Terence. 

By taking revenge a man is but even with 
his enemy; but in passing over he is 
superior.— Hacon. 

Pride— that never failing vice of fools.— 
Pope. 

Good nature and evenue39 of temper will 
give you an easy companion for life; virtue 
and good sense an agreeable friend; love 
and constancy a good wife or husband.— 
Spectator. 

Disagreeing in little things and agreeing 
in great ones is what forms and keeps up a 
commerce of society and friendship among 
reasonable men, and among unreasonable 
men, breaks it. — Anon. 

Shun no toil to make yourself remarkable 
by some one talent. Yet do not devote your- 
self to one branch exclusively. Strive to 
get clear notions about all. Give up no 
science entirely, for all science is one. — 
Seneca. 

To be always intending to live a new life, 
but never to find time to set about it; this is 
as if a man should put olT eating and drink- 
ing and sleeping from one day and night to 
another, till he is starved and destroyed.— 
Tillottson 

Georcje Morrow & Go., 

(Established 1854 ) 

fifty ftND GRAIN 
Commission Merchants. 

39 Clay St. and 28 Commercial St., S. F, 
Branches at Bay District, Ingleside. and Third 
St. Hay Wharf. Telephone No. 35 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through line to New York, via Panama, call 
lng at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. Sailing at noon from company's 
wharf. First and Urannan streets. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

S. S. "Sau Bias," January 28, 1896 
S. S. "San Juan." February 8, 1896. 
S. S. "Aoapuloo," February 18, 1896. 
S. S. " Sau JoBe," February 88, 1896. 

Japan and China Line for Yokohama and 
Hongkong. 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 
S. S. "Peru," January 18, 1896. 
S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro, "Feb. 6. 1896. 
S. S. "City of Peking," via Honolulu, Febru- 
ary 25, 1896. 
S. S. "China," March 14, 1896. 

Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street. 

ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOU JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 p M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

COPTIC (via Honolulu)... Tuesday, Jan. 28,1896 

GAELIC Saturday, February 15, 1896 

DORIC Thursday, March 5, 1896 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
office, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STTJBBS, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Ferry — Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20. 11:00 A M; 12:35,3:30 
5:10, 6:30 p M. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11 :30 p M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A M; 1:30. 3:30, 6:00, 
6:20 PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 AM; 12:45, 
8:40, 5:10pm. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:55 
and 6:35 pm. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AM; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6 :25 P M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 

same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 
^IsTno^s. 



I In Effect 
| Oct. 38, 1895. 



Desti'tion. 



Sundays, gg* 



7 :40 A M 
3:30 PM 
5:10 PM 



8:00am 
9:30 AM 
5:00 pm 



Novato, 

Petaluma, 

Santa Rosa. 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle, 

Cloverdale. 



ARRIVE in S. F. 



10:40 am 
6-05 pm 
7:30 pm 



8:50am 
10:30am 
6:15pm 



I Pieta, Hop- I 
lland, Ukiah.l 



7:40A Ml 
3:30pm| 



8:00am Guernevllle 7:30 pm 



7:40 AMI 8:00AM 
5:10pm| 5:00pm 



Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 



10:40am 
6:05PM 



7:40AM| 8:00AM 
3:30 pm| 5:00pm 



Sebastopol. 



110:40am 
I 6:05 pm 



10 30AM 
6:15pm 



8:50am 
6:15pm 



10;30AM 
6:15PM 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelscy ville, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Uklah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Saratoga Springs, 
Upper Lake, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Usal, 
Westport, Laytonville, Willitts, Capella, Pomo, 
Potter Valley, John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly 
Valley, Harris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 



TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., 
Building. 



H.C. WHITING, 

Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 A. M.; Jan. 15, 30. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, Jan 5,10, 
15, 30, 36, 30, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pom- 
ona, "atfcp.M. Jan. 2. 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 36, 30 and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a.m. Jan. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Jan. 2, 6, 10, 14 18, 22, 26, 30, 
and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 A. M. 

For Ensenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz. Altata, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley." 10 A.M., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-flelds, 
(Freeman tie) Australia, 
$220 first class, $110 steer- 
age. Lowest rates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 

For HONOLULU, APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S MARIPOSA, 
Feb. 6th, 1896. at 2 p. m. 
For HONOLULU, S. S* 
"AUSTRALIA." 
Sat in day, Feb. 15, at 10 A M 
REDUCED SPECIAL RATES for parties Feb. 
6th and 15th, 1886. 
For passage apply to 114 Montgomery street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market street. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 







Annmil Silfrri'iiliim, ti.OO. 








Vol. Lit. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY /, 1806. 



Number 5. 



Pri*Ud ttnti Publish - ;rjr Ay M* proprittor. PREP V. I/; /:/"/'/'. 

«DC-«o»-«JJ Mfrtkant »tr*ft. San />•! m Fnlttritco 

Postojlc* a* £ Uatttr. 

Tht ojlni o/ UU -VA"il n LETTER i • .V ■ )"..» CKf i« (J 

■ rmation mny 

b* o' I .ulrtrlinng I 

W ANTED.— Fur the pulpit of a wealthy and fashionable Con- 
gregational Church, in San Francisco, a homely clergyman 
who will give bonds to behuve himself. One who has no past scan- 
dals in his career preferred. Salary liberal. 



WITH Colonel Burns hastening back from Mexico to 
take a hand on the Republican side, and General 
Buckley issuing commands to his wing of the Democracy, 
the immediate outlook for pure politics in San Francisco 
'od. 

MRS. Carrie Chapman Catt (heaven send her a better 
name), is of the opinion that it is possible to build up 
a great national party, based on the one idea of the en- 
franchisement of women. No doubt; all things are possi- 
ble with God. But has Mrs. Catt ever reflected that it is 
likewise possible to build up a great national part}' on the 
single idea of the disfranchisement of men ? Why not blend 
the two ideas into one glorious whole? Sic sempt r tyrahnis! 

GERMANY'S warlord appears to have crawled into 
the hole made by the explosion caused by his despatch 
to President Kruger. Quiet is becoming to a young man 
who makes a bluff and gets called. And Congress is putting 
this country in the way of knowing just how Emperor 
William feels. One of our challenges may be accepted any 
da}', and then we shall be in the fix of the bad man who 
has no gun. 

OUR esteemed contemporary, the Examiner, appears 
to be anxious to attract not only the attention of the 
public, but that of the police also. Its enterprise in 
exploiting the dives with pen and pencil, and its enthus- 
iastic devotion in its Sunday issues to the Female Leg, sur- 
pass anything that has ever been seen in local journalism. It 
is easily the most indecent paper this side of New York, 
and has only to be prosecuted for obscenity in order to 
take undisputed metropolitan rank. 

IT will not be easy to make the Californian friends of 
John Hays Hammond believe he is the sort of man the 
despatches picture. According to them he, with others, 
invited Br. Jameson to invade the Transvaal, and stood 
ready to take arms when the raid was made, but instead 
of doing that hoisted the Boer flag when the fighting be- 
gan. This would make Hammond out to be a double 
traitor and a coward. Nothing in his character, as it 
was revealed here, would warrant the belief that he could 
have been guilty of such baseness as is imputed to him. 

CJ-MPEROR William of Germany occasionally makes a 
I v sensible suggestion, in matters where his personal 
vanity is not concerned. He is credited with the remark 
that Cuba is lost to Spain, and that the Spanish Govern- 
ment's best course would be to sell the island to the 
United States while there remains any right worth buying. 
It is likely that Spain could make a profitable surrender 
to this country of all her claims upon Cuba, and that 
Cuba would be glad of the opportunity to be admitted to 
the Union, either as a territory or an independent State. 
Even if we did not acquire the island outright, something 
like a protectorate could be established, with satisfaction 
to all concerned. 



JAPAN is giving orders for two battle-ships and four 
armored cruisers. Evidently she means to hold her 
own in the Pacific. She is anticipating trouble with 
Russia, and does not propose to be taken unprepared. 
The island empire is setting this country a good example. 



THERE is something exceedingly ludicrous in Hall 
Caine's serious suggestion that Canada may yet cm- 
broil England in war with this country over the Canadian 
copyright question. That's just like an author. Every 
writer of books magnifies enormously the importance of 
his craft. As a matter of fact, if there is one thing that 
the people of this country are wholly indifferent about, it 
is the copyright question. Save authors and publishers, 
no one cares a rap about it. 

FERRY Belmont has served notice on his brother that 
neither he nor his bride, Mrs. Vanderbilt that was, 
can play hereafter in any of Perry's yards, front or rear. 
Still, as Blenheim is open to the pair, the chances are they 
will have all the opportunities for dancing that they care 
for. That being so, exclusion from Perry's parlors, and 
other New York drawing-rooms, is robbed of its terrors. 
It is possible to live without being admitted to the festi- 
vals of New York society so long as one has the nobility of 
England to fall back on. 



THE brethren of the First Congregational Church are 
persuaded that it is the wicked Mrs. Davidson and 
not good Dr. Brown who must be tried first. And should 
Mrs. Davidson be convicted of blackmail the verdict, 
doubtless, will be construed as the acquittal of the be- 
loved pastor, who has the misfortune to be charged with 
adultery. It is the straight way in which churchly intelli- 
gence goes to the nub of things that excites the respect of 
the worldly mind, and draws sane souls to join the com- 
munion of the Saints. Besides, adultery, as the brethren 
perceive, may or may not be a serious offense. It depends 
on who commits it. 



CANADA is heavily in debt, for a young country, and is 
cursed with a corrupt and extravagant government. 
The Conservative party has held office for many years, 
and knows how to play on the popular heart. The late 
war scare has led to estimates of over a million dollars for 
military purposes, to be expended in the Dominion during 
the year. It seems absurd for the Canadians to be arming 
against the United States, seeing that Canada is scarcely 
exposed to attack from any other source. But if it makes 
them feel better to carry guns and play soldier, that is no 
reason why they should not also play in our yard, if they 
want to, until war actually comes. 



THE late storms brought out upon the streets a number 
of bloomer-clad damsels, who seemed to take a pecul- 
iar delight in the exhibition of their — well, their independ- 
ence of conventionalities. Bloomers are, in fact, sensible 
garments for wet weather, which nobody can deny, and 
while themselves shapeless they serve admirably to set off 
shapeliness in the wearer. But they are very trying, and 
a masculine woman, with sharp angles where there should 
be curves, looks in this form of rainment a veritable scare- 
crow. Even worse, if possible, is the appearance of the 
fat woman in bloomers. However, as one swallow does 
not make a summer, neither does a single pair of bloomers 
on the street set the fashion. The day of bloomers, for 
street wear, has not yet come. For these and other 
mercies, Lord make us truly thankful. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, i8q6. 



WANTED: AN ALTERNATIVE FOR REFUNDING. 

THE man who will not consider all the essential ele- 
ments of a problem has not qualified himself to form, 
much less to express an opinion as to its solution. That is 
the position exactly of Mayor Sutro and his committee of 
fifty in regard to the proposal to refund the railroad's in- 
debtedness to the Government. They will not— dare not 
— say what better plan they have to substitute for that 
which now holds the field. ' Upon any other conceivable 
scheme they would divide and split into fragments. A 
number of them, being cranks, favored the Government 
taking and operating the roads. Another section of them, 
beiug gifted with more worldly wisdom, saw at once that 
such a proposal would never" do; that it was opposed to 
the whole frame work and genius of our Government; that 
it would not bear the test of examination and argument, 
and that it would not command the support of the repre- 
sentatives of a single State in the Union. Promptly, and 
somewhat excitedly, the knaves began to belabor the fools 
and beat them into submission. The Call and Examiner 
were "turned loose" to wrestle with and warn the Govern- 
ment-ownership-men. They were told that the opposition 
must content itself with opposing— simply that and 
nothing more. There must not be so much as a suggestion 
of an alternative plan. Why? Because the knavish por- 
tion of the committee knows full well that it is not possible 
to formulate any other scheme that will at once keep the 
roads in successful operation and protect the Government 
from ultimate loss. That position is here asserted boldly, 
and without fear of its meeting with anything like respect- 
able contradition. The undoubted fact is that the opposi- 
tion has no alternative plan and that it cannot think of 
one that it dare venture to submit to public examination 
and discussion. It knows it cannot, and that is why it 
confines itself to the mere stolid act of opposing. It is also 
why the foolish side of the committee of fifty was so in- 
continently suppressed. In this great constructive coun- 
try of ours thinking men will demand something more than 
mere destruction for destruction's sake. They will desire 
to conserve what they already have, and to enlarge its 
scope and usefulness if possible. If the committee of fifty 
can show how this can be done by some more promising 
plan than that which they are opposing, well and good, 
let them put that plan in evidence and give the people 
whom they are endeavoring to lead, or mislead, an oppor- 
tunity of seeing what it is like. If they cannot do that, 
and until they do it, there remains no further occasion or 
excuse for their engaging the attention of honest, earnest 
miuded meD. 

It is fitting as well as pleasurable to turn to that much 
larger and better class of people, who, without guile or 
malice in their hearts, are intent only upon doing that 
which may seem wisest and best for the present and future 
interests of the State. The paramount requirement of 
California is continuity in the railroad's operations and 
development. Whatever else happens that must be se- 
cured. To suspend or impede those operations by the 
lengthy litigation which foreclosure proceedings would in- 
volve, would be to paralyze every industry in the State. 
Supposing the litigation ended and the foreclosure com- 
plete, what then? Before the Government could take and 
operate the road, it would have to extinguish the prior 
lien upon it. That is to say, it would have to pay off 
the first mortgage bonds. In doing that it would be 
throwing good money after bad, for there is no doubt but 
that the whole line could be paralleled for less money than 
is involved in paying off the first bonds. Further, suppos- 
ing the litigation ended, and this enormous additional 
liability incurred, what would the Government come into 
possession of ? Simply a road-bed from Ogden to San 
Jose, without terminal facilities, or an entrance into this 
City. It would have no right to the side lines and feeders 
which bring to the main line the most profitable portion of 
its business. Clearl. would have to lie made good 

somehow. How else be made good than by in- 

creased fares and freights'.' All that, be it remembered, 
in the name and inter, ts of cbjfiper transportation! With 
national ownership California's interest in the road would 
be but insignificant. On a population ratio it would be 
less than one in fifty. K it not folly to suppose that the 
larger interests of the East would yield to the misguided 



sentiment of California that transportation should be 
afforded our favored section at less than cost price? To 
develop railroad business requires smgular acuteness and 
eternal vigilance. Rivals have to be headed off and new 
country tapped. Does not every man with a head upon 
his shoulders know that our Government could undertake 
no such business with any hope of success, and that if it 
attempted it, the inevitable result would be a fiasco that 
would put the whole country to shame. With changes of 
administration frequent, with the spoils system rampant, 
and with no organized and trained civil service, the 
Government could not begin to make a success of operat- 
ing a great trans-continental railroad. Whatever else 
may be said of the men who control the Central Pacific, 
it must be conceded that they are capable. It must be 
admitted also that they are exercising all possible economy. 
Indeed, the most recent complaint is that they are too 
parsimonious; which is certainly a singular objection to 
come from people who want transportation cheapened. 
Why should the management of the road be taken out of 
the hands of these capable men whose interests are bound 
up with the State? Is it reasonable to expect that we 
should fare better in the hands of strangers with no inter- 
ests in California? But Sutro and his men have a griev- 
ance and want revenge. They, and their like would ruin 
what they cannot rule. Every thoughtful man must see 
that their success would mean the demoralization of al- 
most every industrial interest on this coast. Better, far 
better will it be to refund the debt, permit the railroad to 
go on developing the country, and leave to a new and 
more populous generation the burden of paying for the 
great road it will inherit. 

Talking Through Beyond question the Congress of the 
the United States is the bravest body of 

National Hat. men on earth. It is always ready to 
talk at the drop of the hat — to talk so 
ferociously that the atmosphere of our national capital has 
acquired in permanence a gunpowdery smell. Although 
Congress is elected to legislate for this country only, it 
scorns to spare itself labor and freely lays down the law 
for the whole world. Its latest exhibition of this over-time 
industry is its rebuke to the powers of Europe for not 
regardiug their treaty stipulations wth reference to the 
protection of life and property in Turkey. It is true that 
the United States is not a party to these treaties and that 
no American has been injured in Turkey, but all the same, 
Congress, in its capacity of Universal Regulator, has 
felt called upon to lecture the effete monarchies and tot- 
tering despotisms of the Old World on their duties. 

There are no limits to the jurisdiction of Congress. Tak- 
ing a day off from the customary pastime of twisting the 
British lion's tail — all being quiet at the moment in Ireland 
and Venezuela — it resolved itself on Monday last into a 
Christian assemblage, and went into consideration of the 
state of the faith in Armenia, the sufferings of its co-relig- 
ionists there having afflicted its pious soul. The Turks 
have been slaughtering the Armenians. The assumption 
is all but universally made that the motive for the slaughter 
is religious, though for centuries the tolerant Moslems have 
allowed the Armenians freedom of worship. A clergyman 
of this city who spent ten years in Armenia as a missionary 
asserts that religion has nothing to do with the trouble, 
that the Armenians, a subject race, have grown danger- 
ously independent in the matter of paying taxes, and that 
the Turks treat them as our Southern negroes are treated 
when they manifest a desire to get on top, politically and 
socially. This clergymau was not invited to participate 
in the recent San Francisco mass meeting which called on 
mankind to trample on the Turk for trampling on the Ar- 
menian. It was known that he had been in Armenia, and 
did not take the current view of things because of his su- 
perior knowledge. In this light we see that the Turk is 
suffering from misjudgment by reason of the religious 
prejudice of the Christian world. 

But Congress has no time and no inclination to inquire. 
It costs no more courage to denounce Mahommedans thau 
it does — or did before Utah became a State — to abuse the 
Mormons. In either case votes result and the favor of 
heaven is secured. 

Given, however, that the received version is true — that 
the Turks are killing the Armenians In the name of the 



February i, 1856. 



FRANC I \VS LETTER. 



3 
ad it.- own 
Thai 

■n in a warlike manner it - r If the 

all right: if not if warlike talk is redo 
It will Ignore the rudi 

in from making approprinti ms for armament that 

might offend the adversary, nod seek Bale distraction In the 

if the silver question. 

There has been nothing like the recent globe 

sympathy of Congress since the time of the Assembly of 

Revolutionary Frame The difference bt tween the two ii<«l- 

" hat the Frenchmen, in their enthusiasm for liberty and 
the abstract rights of man. sent armies and navies t . > the 
aid of the oppressed 111 whose behalf they passed resolu- 
tions of the kind that our Congress is continually grinding 
out. We satisfy ourselves with words. 

Pity for the unfortunate is a noble sentiment. A great 
nation that should be so unselfish as to make itself the friend 
and helper of the suffering everywhere would be a special 
Providence to this wicked world. That is what Congress 
appears to wish the United States to be. If it is to be 
really that kind of a good Samaritan among the powers it 
must be prepared to fight them. Resolutions such as those 
of Monday, as well as cartels like President Cleveland's 
Venezuela message, are worse than empty if they are not 
backed by the power to make them good in war. Other- 
wise they are foolish, and make the United States ridic- 
ulous. That we are not capable of making them good, and 
cannot be until hundreds of millions of dollars have been 
spent on our navy and coast defenses, everybody who is 
not a fool is aware. Even the average member of Con- 
gress knows it. 

Dastardly Speech In a political way, the most remark- 
ed able event of the week is Senator 

Senator Tillman. Tillman's grossly personal attack upon 
President Cleveland. Nothing more 
disgraceful has occurred at Washington. in a long time. 
The South Carolina demagogue distinguished himself by 
calling the President a "bull-headed and self-idolatrous 
man,'' a "besotted tyrant," aud, what is far worse, 
declared "millions of his countrymen suspect that a 
President can use his high office for private gain." The 
latter reference was to the sale of bonds, with the object 
of maintaining the gold reserve, and was accompanied by 
remarks of a like character, evidently meant to insinuate 
that the President had lent himself, from corrupt 
motives, to what Tillman calls the schemes of the "gold 
ring" in New York. Secretary Carlisle likewise came in 
for a share of Tillman's abuse. The great Kentuckian was 
referred to as a "Judas," a "renegade" and a moral 
coward. This sort of talk disgusts everybody of good 
sense and feeling. The course of the President, in finan- 
cial as in other matters of a public nature, is at all times 
properly subject to criticism, aimed at the measures and 
not at the man. But to insinuate or suggest that he is dis- 
honest, is a thing so vile and atrocious that the people 
must recoil from the calumny in disgust. Whatever may 
be Cleveland's faults, there cannot be the slightest reason 
to doubt his patriotism or his integrity. No man who ever 
filled the Presidential office could in this respect bear a 
more rigid scrutiny than Grover Cleveland. By attacks 
of this sort, fellows like Tillman do a vast amount of mis- 
chief, not by discrediting the persons whom they abuse, 
but by disgusting good men with public life. The tendency 
of such calumnies is to keep the best and most capable 
men from filling offices of high trust and responsibility, 
since it is notorious that however pure their motives and 
honorable their course of action, some blackguard will 
arise to impeach the one and blacken the other. 

Tillman's glaring ignorance of finance is no less con- 
spicuous than his vilely slanderous nature. His recklessly 
false assertions regarding the silver question are liable to 
do much mischief, among the class of minds akin to his 
own. He professed to believe in the existence of a 
"damnable scheme of robbery," which aims to destroy 
silver as a money metal; and so forth. He declared, after 
the fashion of Debs, that this country is fast drifting into 



. the only Tillman propl 

that - men now "trampii 

highw would march to \\ 

With I 11 the liberties 

from them or which their representatives have 

This is the precious fruit of Populism. It "in not be the 

fault rs" as Tillman if all the forces of un- 

rest, discontent ami rebellion break out at some future time 

in open mutiny against law and order. But as yet, there 
Is no danger of any "wading in gore"— except on paper. 

Possibilities When reports began to come from Huropc 
Of The New a week or two ago, of the disc. 

Photography, method of photographing the interior of 

a living human body, the average reader 

was disposed to be exceedingly skeptical as to the truth- 
fulness of the announcement. But it appears to be amply 

confirmed. Edison has explained the principle of this 
novel application of radiant energy, by means of which "I, 
Joels that we have been ai led to call opaque are 

found to possess a certain translucency. These radiant 
heat rays, it appears, are produced by an electric current 
flowing through a vacuum tube, and are themselves in- 
visible. Professor Roentgen, of Vienna, the inventor of 
the new photography, has succeeded in photographing a liv- 
ing man in such a manner as to show nothing but his skele- 
ton, though it is related that the subject was fully clothed 
when he sat for the portrait of his bones. It is further 
reported that a German editor had his skull photographed 
by the new, mysterious agency, and was so horrified by 
the appearance of the negative that he broke the plate 
and would on no account consent to a duplication of the 
picture. It is not at all surprising that the editor should 
thus shrink from exposing a representation of his thinking 
apparatus to the public gaze. The picture may have been 
to the journalist the first bint that he had ever received 
of the poverty of his intellectual outfit. But the experi- 
ment suggests a host of interesting possibilities. This new 
photography may accomplish wonders. It may become 
the fashion to submit preachers, teachers, writers, doctors, 
lawyers, and professional men generally to the test of the 
Roentgen camera. The discovery may relegate the 
pseudo-science of phrenology to oblivion. For why should 
any credulous person pay a craniological professor to feel 
bumps, when for less money a photograph of the actual 
brain substance may be had, with all its convolutions and 
involutions? Enthusiasts say that doctors will use the 
Vienna discovery for the exploration of the hidden mys- 
teries of the body, the location of bullets, the diagnosis 
of internal tumors and other morbid growths. Instead of 
taking a sharp knife and opening up the abdominal cavity, 
with a view to inspection of the inside thereof, surgeons 
will content themselves with a photograph showing more 
than the most venturesome laparotomy could disclose. 
There will be less cutting and carving, and more science in 
the methods of surgery. Of late years the doctors have 
been pluming themselves on the great advance of their 
art, as manifested by this bold practice of cutting the 
patient open to take a look at his interior. This explora- 
tory incisive method was, in truth, an improvement on the 
old way of guessing, but will soon appear exceedingly 
crude if the Roentgen method of photography is what it is 
cracked up to be. And with the new process in full opera- 
tion, everybody will be able to command, at small cost, a 
picture of his own skeleton, and so may ascertain how he 
will look some years after death. 

Our Faith For a time it was dreaded in some quarters 
is lest the religious controversy to which 

Lukewarm, some of our daily papers opened their . 
columns for fear of offending the combatants 
should lead to deplorable public excitement and perhaps 
riot. But these apprehensive ones did not understand 
how deeply indifferent to spiritual things this godless city 
is. A graceless pleasure, to be sure, was evinced in 
witnessing a free fight in which the coat-tails of parsons 
and the gowns of priests were wildly mingled, but the 
sport fatigued when the novelty departed. And the with- 
drawal of popular interest has obviously affected the con- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 



tending theologians. Their fiery spirits have cooled, and 
they fight now with popguns instead of cannon. Ex- 
changes of assurance of distinguished consideration have 
taken the place of insults which promised to revive the 
best traditions of the age of faith. A skeptical environ- 
ment has reduced Father Yorke and Parson Wendte to 
the cruel necessity of debating like gentlemen. They 
know that the average reader of the newspapers is at 
best languidly interested in doctrine, and generally 
amused at those who pretend to take medieval creeds 
seriously. A screed from Colonel Ingersoll would be read 
by a thousand Californians, not ten of whom could be in- 
duced to wade through the best effort of a Yorke or a 
Wendte, well as both "these anachronistic defenders of the 
faith of the fathers write. 

But it is not so everywhere. Thank heaven, true piety 
survives here and there to put to shame the coldness of 
the lax. When men and women really believe they act on 
their belief, and do not exhaust their earnestness in mere 
words. Contrast the living faith of Crawfordsville, Indiana, 
with the dead formalism of San Francisco. Mr. William 
Hays, of Crawfordsville, the telegraph relates, came 
home the other day and found in his parlor a piano which 
his wife and daughter had purchased with their savings. 
"He was enraged," we learn, "and began smashing the 
piano with an ax, declaring it to be an instrument of the 
devil." There could be no doubt of the genuineness of the 
belief of Mr. Hays. Neither, on the other hand, could his 
wife, who held contrary views as to the relations of music 
to religion, be accused of want of fidelity to her convic- 
tions, for, while the husband was engaged in his part of 
the controversy and wrecking the piano, Mrs. Hays main- 
tained her faith by striking him with the poker, fractur- 
ing his skull and knocking him insensible." We are in- 
formed, further, that the good man is not likely to have 
another opportunity of testifying his disapproval of 
pianos, for he is tolerably sure to die. 

Contrast this exhibition of stout, practical piety with 
the lukewarmness of Father Yorke and Brother Wendte, 
whose faith would once have inspired either with the de- 
sire to burn the other at the stake. Now they salute like 
courteous knights and fall to fighting with nothing more 
deadly than pens. One Crawfordsville ax, one Crawfords- 
ville poker, is more eloquent of real piety than all the 
pages of the Examiner and Call which the latitudinarian 
Wendte and the liberal Yorke have covered with their 
pale ink. The spirit is not with us. We are a dead commu- 
nity, for which the prayers of Crawfordsville are needed. 

The Curves of It is generally denied to the philanthropist 
Philanthropy, to have his good works fully appreciated 
during his lifetime. There is Mayor Sutro, 
for example. His new electric railroad to Sutro's Cliff 
House has been opened, and a surface examination of its 
methods of operation would make it appear to the unthink- 
ing that it is a strictly business concern, devised to make 
money, just as if it were owned by a capitalist, instead of 
a philanthropist. But a closer investigation corrects this 
view. Coupons come in to mitigate the commercial char- 
acter of the enterprise. If you ride out on Mr. Sutro's cars 
and buy a return ticket you are given — freely and without 
price — two coupons. One of these will admit you to Sutro 
Heights, hitherto open to the public but now supplied with 
gatekeepers, who levy ten ceuts a head on all who have 
ridden on other cars than those of Mr. Sutro. The second 
coupon is good for five cents at the door of the Sutro baths. 
Heretofore, the price to see the wonders thereof has been 
ten cents. Now it is fifteen to all who arrive on cars not 
belonging to Mr. Sutro. Thus it will be seen that, by the 
simple means of raising the rates to the patrons of his 
competitors, Mr. Sutro makes of the patrons of his own 
cars a favored class, and gets just as much money at the 
baths as before, and the receipts at the Heights in addi- 
tion. These last are clear gain. Of course, if this gain 
went into Mr. Sutro's pocket to stay there it would look 
as if he had invented a smart scheme to increase his for- 
tune, which would be all right in a plain business man, if 
puzzling in a philanthropist. But Mr. Sutro cares nothing 
for what goes into his pocket. He intends to give to the 
public, some time, whatever reaches it. He has said so 
himself, often. 
Those who are interested in philanthropy cannot but 



regret that Mr. Sutro has not extended the coupon system. 
It would be a boon to the people should every passenger 
on his ears be permitted to buy as many coupons as he 
pleases, the said coupons to pass as currency for evei'y 
thing at Sutroville. Why not a Sutro coupon good for live 
cents on the price of a drink at Sutro's Cliff House bar 1 
A Sutro coupon for half the price of admission to Sutro's 
Magic Swing ? A Sutro coupon good for a bag of Sutro 
peanuts ? A Sutro coupon good for a look through a Sutro 
glass at the Sutro sea lions on Sutro's seal rocks ? And, 
finally, why not a coupon privileging the holder to gaze in 
at a window of the Sutro residence, at stated hours, and 
see Mr. Sutro engaged in signing deeds of gift of his prop- 
erty to the city of San Francisco ? But this last coupon 
would be too cheap at five cents. Mr. Sutro would be 
warranted in making the price ten cents. 

It may be thought that these suggestions are impert- 
inent — that Mr. Sutro is entirely competent to attend to 
his own large and imposing business. But it has to be 
remembered that we are all parties in intei'est to Mr. 
Sutro's success. What he makes is to be ours. We have 
his word for that. Hence, it is the duty of a San Fran- 
cisco journal to give Mr. Sutro its advice in the public 
interest. And it is also the manifest duty, in the public 
interest, of every citizen to ride on Mr. Sutro's Pbilan- 
thi'opic Electric Railway, and purchase coupons for Sutro 
Heights, Sutro Baths, Sutro Magic Swing, Sutro Peanuts, 
Sutro Seals, and Sutro Drinks. Above all, dimes should be 
spared for the Ten-Cent Coupon entitling the possessor to 
behold the Philanthropist deeding away his property to 
the People. That is a sight which anybody ought to be 
willing to give a short bit to see. 

Leap Year And Thackeray remarks, in " Vanity Fair," 
Its that "any woman, with fair opportuni- 

Opportunities. ties, and without an absolute hump, may 
marry whom she chooses." This wise 
observation is to be commended to the attention of those 
of the fair sex who are disposed to wed yet are waiting 
for suitors. In truth, if women knew their power, there 
would be no bachelors; at least, none worth marrying. 
This assumes that all women would marry if they could do 
so, and the assumption is not one of great violence. Of 
course, not every woman would embrace the matrimonial 
state, on general principles purely, but it is safe to say 
that those who would not prefer conjugality to single-bless- 
edness, if allowed a reasonable range of choice in the selec- 
tion of a husband, are in a very small minority. On this 
theory, then, and in view of the fact that this is leap year, 
it may tend to help the work of the Half Million Club if 
encouragement be given the diffident daughters of Eve to 
practice on the weakness of their fellow man. For 
marriages are not made in heaven, but are of the earth 
earthy. Yet not for this reason is the matrimonial state 
to be condemned. Rather the contrary, since the institu- 
tion is in perfect harmony with nature, and springs from 
natural rather than spiritual impulses. This is the chief 
reason why the uususpecting man is easily captured by 
the clever woman who understands human nature, and 
particularly the masculine branch of the subject. What 
Thackeray had in view, no doubt, was the fact that the 
sentiment of love, which is the ruling motive of marriage, 
on one side or the other, if not on both arises almost in- 
variably as a result of propinquity. Given the right sort 
of material to work with, and it would be as easy for a 
cunning match-maker to bring about a love affair as for 
a pigeon-fancier to mate a pair of his birds. It is merely 
a matter of throwing young people together a great deai, 
and as much as possible to the exclusion of others; under 
favorable circumstauces as to time and place. Nature 
does the rest. Beauty in the female is by no means essen- 
tial. Sympathy is by far the better bait. Thousands of 
bachelors are aching to find some truly sympathetic soul, 
capable of appreciating their own sterling merits, most of 
which are hidden so far below the surface that no man 
could ever discover them. It is true that a great many 
men think they cannot afford to marry, but these succumb 
to the right sort of tackle, just as the shyest old trout 
may be at last brought to basket by the patient angler. 
The truly sympathetic woman always says she does not 
wonder that men are afraid to marry in these times — most 
women are "so extravagant! " But, as for herself, her 



February i, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 1.1 . 



wants are very little, and 5 >PPy in 

a neat flat, or u very n 

And so 

-ml tlu- - 

time after 

- The « woman never talks o( the 

the hotel, while spreading 

her matrimonial m-t. She believes in being a help-meet, 

and is full of the mo-t wonderful plans regarding domestic 

life. When the summer comes, Bhe will go forth to the 

le or the mountains, if she ran afford it, and some 

- if she cannot, although th.re is excellent bunting iii 

San Francisco the year round. The game at the Bummer 

iwever, is usually of « richer sort, though it is 

apt to be shy of capture. As an offset to this war 

the opportunities pursuit are superior where men 

are merely seeking pleasure and recreation. 

It must be confessed that one great difficulty that girls 
young or not so young, have to contend with, is the sordid 
e of many men to marry a fortune. This is for poor 
girls a difficulty not to be despised, but it may be circum- 
vented, for all that. And yet. in behalf of the many 
(rood young women whom nature has not greatly 
favored, it would be well could there be introduced in this 
country a peculiar custom of the Babylonians, as related 
by Herodotus. Once a year in every village there was 
what may be called an auction, of the maidens of marriage- 
able age. The unmarried men formed a circle, enclosing the 
girls. First a herald offered the most beautiful of the 
maidens, and she was assigned to whomsoever would give 
for the choice the largest sum of money. Then the next 
in attractiveness would be disposed of, and so on until all 
the beauties had been sold. Then the most ill-favored 
would be offered to the man who would agree to wed her 
for the smallest bonus, and the herald would proceed with 
the others, in the order of their homeliness, until all had 
found husbands. The marriage portions of the plain girls 
were paid out of the premium fund obtained by the bidding 
for those most fair. It was further provided that if any 
of the couples thus mated should not, on further acquaint- 
ance, agree to the match, a release could be had by 
forfeit of the money paid or received. And fathers were 
not allowed to give their daughters in marriage; all had to 
be subject to the custom described. If our Half Million 
Club could set some such fashion as this on foot in San 
Francisco, the population would grow with a celerity that 
would gratify the most ambitious for her future. Un- 
happily, under present conditions, many of our eligible 
young men are so greedy as to seek not only beauty but 
wealth along with it. Every one of these selfish fellows 
should be trapped in the campaign of '96, by the methods 
above outlined, and be condemned to hard labor for life in 
support of a numerous family. In nine cases out of ten, 
they would be thus better off, in reality; that is to say, 
happier, than though they should succeed in marrying 
money and beauty to boot. This is the year for the girls 
who are neither rich nor beautiful to do missionary work 
among these misguided young men, and reclaim them from 
their selfish lives. Let the young women remember that 
if they don't marry it's their own fault. 

The Alms House In the communication which the Sup- 
Charges, erintendent of the City and County 
Alms House has made to the Board of 
Health, concerning the charges of "inefficiency, neglect 
of duty, arbitrary action, financial mismanagement, and 
religious intolerance," Mr. P. L. Weaver has made a 
strong defense, and, by the simple and exact reasoning of 
figures, seems to have proved to those who made the re- 
cent charges to Governor Budd that his six years' admin- 
istration of the Superin tendency has been far more suc- 
cessful for the City and County tax-payers' pockets than 
that of his predecessors. The average daily cost per in- 
mate during Superintendent Keating's administration, 
taking the six years from 1883 to 1889, was seventeen 
cents per day. Through a series of important reforms, 
Mr. Weaver has reduced the daily cost per inmate to seven 
and one-sixth cents per day. Yet his predecessor had 
twenty-five per cent, less inmates, on the average, to take 
care of. Archbishop Riordan's letter, attesting to the 
religious toleratance of Mr. Weaver's wife, the matron, is 
included in the document. 



Th« P»n ai.|„ .1 
of Doctors. lion ill Kn; 

men to tin 

In tl 

it- gOOd The question inVO 

guide the medl 
there 1- one rule for the 1 
for the poor, the latter tempered with mercy. If a i 
holder has apparently a rood Income, the doctor in this 
country, as well .1- in England, charges him a< 
appearances, without for a moment considering thi 
value of In- In other words, he makes himself a 

■ assessor of the Income tax. Bui while he is specu- 
lating upon the income of hi- monied patient, he always 

seems to forget thai in ni :asesou1 of ten the drain upon 

the revenue of the property owner is Far greater in pro- 
portion than thai of hi- neighbor or humbler means, [n 

short, medical men only do themselves an injury, 

financially and professionally, in exaggerating for . 

ment the apparent plenitude Of his victim's- (pardon! 

patient's)— property, it ; s far the best policy tocon 
aider the actual value of one's medical skill, than to dally 
over the fatness of his bank book. 

Misuse of a The court rooms in this city — all but 
Latin Quotation, one — are without staring mottoes to tell 
you that you will there get all you de- 
serve. But the probate department is fixed dif- 
ferently. It has a Judge who is vainglorious of his pre- 
sumed honesty, and as if there wasn't room for many 
honest or learned men in one room, he loves to snub lawyers 
and show his superiority to men inferior to him in no way, 
either in learning or honesty. He has lately decorated his 
canopy with a little original Latin. Fiat jitxti/ia mat 
ccelum, which means: "Let justice be done though a burin 
fall." It is a travesty on the older maxim, showing the in- 
flexibility of the law: Fiat justitia mat ccelum, which means: 
"Let justice be done though the heavens fall." When you 
appear before the Judge, and take a view of the law which 
he does not, you are apt to get justice as he interprets it, 
and in getting it you feel as if you had been struck on the 
head with a burin. Some have thought the Judge's Latin 
was as bad as his law is sometimes, or that possibly the 
old maxim was intended. But he deals not in simply old 
maxims. He deals out new ones, if he wants to, and if 
you fancy he is mistaken you err. That Judge never 
makes mistakes — he thinks. 

The Armenian A cry has gone up from all Christendom 
Question. that the Sultan of Turkey be forced to 
"sheathe his bloody sword and stay the 
frenzied rage of his fanatical soldiery and subjects." 
The most Christian nations of Europe weep for the 
massacred Armenians, but not one of them dare so 
much as lift a finger against the Sultan. They all despise 
and hate the unspeakable Turk, but the awful bogie of the 
" balance of power " stands in the way of action. As for 
this particular Christian nation, we might help the 
Armenians if we would, but the Monroe doctrine, you 
know, forbids us from meddling with European affairs. So 
the Christian world continues to look on, and the Sultan 
"sheathes his bloody sword" in a few more of the 
Armenians from day to day. There is one consolation for 
the pious Christian everywhere: the Christian Armenians 
are fast disappearing, and after they are all gone the 
bloodshed will cease. 

Americans An idea seems to prevail in this country 
Abroad. that every American citizen who gets into 
trouble abroad, and is put under arrest by 
the authorities, is entitled to immediate liberation on 
application of the Government of the United States. 
Nothing could be more absurd. A foreigner in any coun- 
try is certainly not entitled to more consideration than a 
citizen of that country. If the foreigner transgress the 
laws, he must take the consequences. The most that his 
Government can do for him is to see that he receives as 
fair a trial as the country in which he may be provides for 
its own citizens, under like circumstances. American 
citizens who go abroad should understand that their safety 
and freedom depends upon their good behavior, and that 
they cannot with impunity violate the laws of any land. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 





■ We Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — 1'om Moore. 



N' 



TO man better estimates to what extent 
the tension of " human interest " may 
be stretched with the American people than 
does David Belasco. Before The Heart of 
Mainland had established his single-handed 
51 ability for play-making, we were prone to 
attribute all semblance of literary flavor and nicety of 
expression to his co-laborer, and credit Belasco with the 
skillful adjustment of the crescendos, the impressive 
climaxes, the deft interventions of the curtain and 
the general application of that mystifying and indispensable 
art, stage technic. Belasco, alone, stood for nothing; but, 
when this cipher followed a unit, the ten-fold multiplication 
of strength and compactness was conceded. That this, in 
its way, was as unjust as the placid indifference many 
Americans have exhibited for Henry Irving's genius as an 
actor — while unrestricted praise has been lavished on his 
stage generalship, scenery, and effects — is now undoubted. 
It is a difficult thing to accurately determine to whom the 
honors are due in a play written in collaboration, but it is 
safe to wager that Belasco has contributed a generous 
half of every piece that bears his name. Like a great 
many people engaged in the gentle pastime of writing 
plays to be played by players and supported by the dollars 
of the amusement-loving public, Mr. Belasco is eccentric 
enough to turn his attention to works that attract the 
greatest number of these very vital dollar bearers; and, 
though adding nothing to the dramatic literature of our 
age that is destined to be embalmed, he sings a note that 
finds a thousand echoes in our contemporaneous life, points 
a moral in a wholesome, decent manner, keeps life in the 
theatres, and, let us hope, grows moderately rich — a re- 
ward as acceptable to the practical mind as garret starva- 
tion and a monument from posterity. 

* * * 

De Mille & Belasco's Men ami Women is a good example 
of what constitutes the successful American drama of to- 
day. Its story is straight-forward, gradually and evenly | 
developed, and, up to the end of the third act (the last 
act, necessary as it is, cannot but savor of an anti-climax), 
full of intense dramatic interest. The great scene of the 
play is in the third act, where the bank directors hold a 
midnight meeting in Mr. Cohen's house. There are a few 
tricks levelled at the gallery that, removed, would add 
much to the dignity and impressiveness of this otherwise 
wonderfully constructed act. The picture of the Savior in 
the Jew's house was a mere bid for a discussion that would 
be prolific of much gratuitous advertising. It accomplished 
its purpose. The adjacency of the handcuffs when the 
guilty cashier gives himself up to the law, and his fasten- 
ing them upon his own wrists, is another theatric Belasco- 
incidence that detracts much from the artistic worth of 
the scene. But despite the over-sensationalism that crops 
out in places, the story is told in a way that holds 
the audience for three full hours — a length of time that 
would kill a play of doubtful merit. 

* # * 

The Frawley Company gives a most creditable per- 
formance of Men and Women. The stage settings are ad- 
mirable, and the stage direction, particularly that of the 
third act, is beyond improvement. Mr. Arbuckle is not at 
his best in the role of the cashier. He is an earnest, con- 
scientious actor, but he lacks the emotional quality in its 
most delicate appreciation that must permeate the part of 
this remorseful, conscience-tortured man. A strong re- 
enforcement to the Frawley cast is George Osbourae's 
Israel Cohen, played with a convincing dignity and keen 
perception of the noble nature of the Jew, who would 
sacrifice his last possession to save the depositors of the 
bank. Mr. Osbourne makes the character vivid and life- 
like; he shows how, even in this wily age, the spirit of in- 
tegrity and honor may be made beautiful and real. Mr. 
Frawley is amassing an amazing fund of agility, so much 
so that I am more than ever inclined to think that there 



are two T. Daniels — one a living picture on castors, em- 
bowelled with a phonograph; the other an impassioned, 
wildly pulsating young gentleman, such as the assistant 
cashier of this week. Miss Bates should always be cast in 
some well-dressed, airy part. She has such a one as Mrs. 
Delafield, and makes it delightfully humorous and charm- 
ing. Miss Kennark's Agnes Rodman is not complete. 
There is an unaffected sympathy and a grace that are 
wanting, though the conception is good in many parts. 
Governor Rodman is the best character work that Mr. 
King has presented in a long time. Mr. Enos is excellent 
as the attorney of the bank, and Mr. Bosworth does quite 
a distinguishing bit of eccentric comedy as Mr. Pendleton. 
Mr. Leslie, of the staccato ha! ha! and perpetual motion, 
and Mr. Blakemore, whose sunny speech suggests banjos 
and mint juleps, are each in happy accord with the re- 
spective roles of Sam Delafield and Colonel Kip. It is 
very reluctantly that San Francisco says mi revoir to the 

Frawley Company. 

* * # 

The many people that have gone to the Alcazar this 
week to see A Canting Scoundrel, with its flaming sub-title 
of Wearing !/«■ Livery of Heaven la Serve the Devil, were per- 
haps happily disappointed to find the play nothing more 
deadly than Jerome K. Jerome's bright little comedy, TJie 
Councillor's Wife, now known in England as The Prude's 
Progress, with a few slight changes, such as making the 
councillor a parson and transposing the scene of action to 
San Francisco. It is no more sensational than is an exege- 
sis by Mr. Bok, though every line that the canting scoun- 
drel utters is attended with breathless interest by the 
audience in its effort to find some covert meaning of local 
significance in his speech. Francis Powers did well as the 
preacher, and Fanny Young was surprisingly breezy and 
efficient as his wife. It would be amusing to hear what 
Mr. Jerome and the Playgoers' Club have to say of this re- 
cent adaptation and re-naming of Jerome's many-titled 
comedy. 

* # * 

Rachel Walker, the Creole nightingale, is making a suc- 
cess at the Orpheum that bids fair to rival the Black 
Patti's triumph in New York. This week she sings the 
soprano aria from La Trariata, "Coming Through the 
Rye," and several ballads and songs from the operas. The 
Orpheum patrons have at once popularized her, and the 
song and dance gentlemen and the balancing ladies have 
been relegated to a second place in their esteem. De Bes- 
sell does his wonderful modeling in clay, Gilmour& Leonard 
do an act similar to Gilbert & Goldie's (though not half so 
clever), the One and a Half make fun enough for three, 
and a number of good specialties by new and old people 

fill out the programme. 

* * # 

Though The Editor develops no new melo-dramatic pos- 
sibilities, but insists rather on rehashing a number of those 
shiny and time-worn, it has enjoyed a good presentation at 
Morosco's Grand Opera House this week and crowded 
the house nightly. Frank B. Hatch was full of life and 
action in the title rdle, and the usual good support was 
given him by the company. For next week, Sins of the 
Night, a sensational melodrama by Frank Harvey, is an- 
nounced. 

* * * 

The long heralded Tavary Opera Company will appear 
at the Baldwin Theatre. Monday uight in Aida; Tuesday, 
Carmen; Wednesday matinee, Bohemian Girl; Wednesday 
night, Hugenotsj Thursday, Mignon; Friday, Cavalleria 
Rusiirana and Pagliacci; Saturday matinee, Martha; Sat- 
urday night, Lohengrin — surely a series of feasts in which 
every music lover may find several favorite operas. Dur- 
ing the second week of its engagement the company pre- 
sents Trovatore, Tannhauser, Faust, and Lucia, besides 
several repetitions from the first week. 

* * * 

The Kimball Opera Company, with the "peerless 
Corinne" and sixty people, said to have special talents for 
singing, dancing, and merrymaking, will appear at the 
California on Monday night in the operatic extravaganza, 
Hendrick Hudson, Jr. The costumes and scenery are all 
new, as also are said to be the jokes and songs. 



February I. 1896. 



SAN IRANY |-i.;r 



When tli. - . Professor Rascwald, was 

suddenly stricken by death, be 
in illustrated leetur.- 

" for the benefit of the Si Fund at the 

University. H .irrinl out under the 

rnoon, Peb, 
Theatre. ;ii 3:30 p. >i . and by his 
laulus, ami Coffin, ae 
by Miss Morey and Miss Weizel. The ohj. 
a " Kosewaid Memorial Fund" for the University. 
• • « 

• lay eveninjr will see a new opera at the Tivoli, Thr 
composed by the late E J. Darling. The 
book is written by Est. 'lie Clayton and Nvm Crinkle. The 
full strength of the Tivoli company, including little Gertie 
Carlisle, will be required for the presentation. New 
ery. beautiful costumes, and elaborate accessories, also a 
Mexican ballet and typical Mexican orchestra, are promised. 
/'. r fWuehtUt is in preparation to follow. 

The play for the coming week at the Alcazar is The 

'an Might*, Sydney Grundy's exquisite comedy. It 

was given here last season by the Frawley Company with 

great success, and should prove a good attraction in the 

hands of Mr. Grover and his players. 

Next Saturday afternoon begins the new season of Carr- 
Beel concerts at Golden Gate Hall. Miss Marian Taylor, 
just returned from Paris, where she has studied with Mar- 
chesi. is to be the vocalist. 

To the many people who could not secure seats for Men 
and Women, at the Columbia this week, it will be welcome 
news that the play is to be continued another week. 

R. A. Lucchesi will give a musical recital of some of his 
recent compositions on Sunday, February 9th, at 3 o'clock, 
at Beethoven Hall. 

" Hear, Ye Faithful, Hear," is the title of a hymn just 
published for soprano, with violin obligato, by J. H. Rose- 
wald. 

INTEGRITY SUCCEEDS. 



ONE of the most available J'oung men in the local and 
State Republican party for Congress, next election, is 
Louis Ernst Phillips, the brilliant young attorney. While 

not a politician, — for 
his law practice occu- 
pies many hours of his 
days and nights — Mr. 
Phillips finds time to 
honestly attend to his 
patriotic duties as a 
citizen. A native of 
New York State, and 
thirty-four years of 
age, he is in the prime 
of youthful manhood, 
and has made his record 
at the bar. He is a Ma- 
son, a Knight Templar, 
and a Noble of the Mys- 
tic Shrine — and has 
many friends. In a cel- 
ebrated legal contro- 
versy here once, a pow- 
erful and wealthy oppo- 
nent, a well-known cap- 
italist, did his best to 
circumvent the young 
lawyer with offers of 
gold. 

"I never betrayed man, woman or child!" exclaimed the 
indignant young attorney, with anger. "All the money 
your client has couldn't buy me!" 

The large interests which Mr. Phillips controls in his 
profession as attorney and counsellor-at-law require the 
utmost judgment and integrity. He is descended from that 
famous stock of Massachusetts which begot his great rela- 
tive, Wendell Phillips. 

Lucullus used to send out pirates in the old Roman days to cap- 
ture oysters. Moraghan, the celebrated oyster dealer in the Califor- 
nia Market, takes care of these matters nowadays. Stalls 68-70. 




Louis Ernst Phillips. 



Baldwin Theatre 



f»m..u« ma 

* TAVARY 



Al BUTIU* .. ..rutod) 

Prop, 

FVbruary M . f.ir lhrw> «. 

GRAND X OPERA X GO.* 

rolRS, nr.t wcok: 
M<.nd»r. am. a .1.1 Minima 

Krl.Uy. 1 >v II inn, Rl 
■tlaj Hi in in,,t- an d i p A oi iacci 

Satunlav. I BUORxn 

- l».vir»tloi-.- 11 liniiW Oltk (Al popular |ir 
S.lliirUul mum,.-,- M mii, iv 



Gnli imkln Tk/>-,i^ Tbo" Ocm" Theatre of the CjomL 
oiumuia 1 neatre- rrieaiuder, cottiob&oo.. Lc»eca 

and Mnniv. 
A 1 ■■' hi. I bj gnat popular ileniuilil tin- KKAWI.EY 

CO.MPAN'V will rfin 1I1; iiuer. Now erorrbod 

aec 

MEN AND WOMEN 
Thi- most perflool perform&noa to twenty long 

'inti. Includinti Sunday. Matinee on Snturday only. 
Boata 160, 85o, ;>.r. ;n .. . 



G -.!.-£/■*.-« I -^ TL^^l « AL. HAvman& Co., (Incorporated) 
aliTornia I neatre. proprietors 

Monday, F.-bniary Sd. one week odIv. Matinee Saturday. 
THE KIMBALL OPERA COMIQUE COMPANY Of sixty 
people, and the peerless 



OORINNE 
In the operatic extravaganza, 

HENDRIGK HUDSON 

Tuesday, February lltb— Thomas K.ene. 



cJR. 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 



Mrs. Ernestine Kreling. 

Proprietor and Manager 

To begin Monday evening. Feb. 3d. Every evening. The new 
American opera in three acts, entitled 

THE GENTLE SAVAGE. 

Music, mirth, dance. The Fan Dance. The Mexican Fan- 
dango The '4fl Mining Camp Melanga Splendid Cast. Cor- 
rect Costumes, New Scenery. A typical Mexican Orchestra. 
Popular Prices 25c and 50o 

Morosco's Grand Opera House. 

Walter Morosco, Sole Lessee and Proprietor. 

Last performances or '• The Editor." 

MONDAY EVENING, Feb. 3d— b rank Harvey's sensational 

melodrama, 



SINS OF THE 

Matinees Saturdays and Sundays. 



NIGHT. 



QpQ\/gp'Q MlcSZar The Palais Royal of America. 

Easily the best comedy to-day on the American stage, ''A 
CANTING SCOUNDREL. " Theatre crowded with the fashion 
of San Francisco; delighted; smiles and tears mingled. 
Monday, Feb. 3d, Sydney Grundy's exquisite comedy, 

THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Night Prices— 10c, 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c. 
Matinee Prices— 10c, 15c, and a5c. 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

rp ne U m . street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 
To-night and during the week. A brilliant, 

AUGMENTED BILL. 

MONS. DE BESSELL, HEELEY & MARBA, RACHEL 

WALKER, and a peerless vaudeville company. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony, 10c; Opera chairs and box 

seats, 50c 

Golden Gate hall, m gutter street. 

The 49th 

GARR-BEEL SATURDAY POP. 

Concert takes place February 8th. at 3:15 p. M. 

MISS MARION TAYLOR, Vocalist. 

Single subscriptions for 4 concerts, including reserved seats, $3; 

are now to be had at Sherman, Clay & Co 's. 



HAZELTON 
HEMME &: LONG 
BROWN &. SIMPSON 



735 Market St. 



PIANOS 



Pianos to Rent and sold on Installmet s. 



I II I 1AM RFnnARn "-^e English actress, coaches ladies and gentle 
LlLLIrtN DCUUMnU. men for the dramatic profession; appearances ar- 



ranged. Shakespearean classes Wednesday evenings. 
EAN ACADEMY,. BISHyde street. San Francisco, Cal. 



SHAKESPEAR- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 




'A&atfgjtt <o^ ; 



NOW that the sun has shone once more, it is really 
pleasant to look back upon the storm, and the amusing 
way in which it baffled the weather prognosticators. Dur- 
ing one of the most violent gales, Forecaster McAdie was 
heard softly singing the following touching ballad: 
I have learned a thing or two, believe 

About this gloomy weather, 
The clouds no longer me deceive, 
Howe'er they bunch together; 
I call the turn now with ease, 

On valley, or mountain, or main, 
So I never hoist up my little black flag, 
Until it begins to rain. 

When all is gloomy overhead, 

And the air oppressively dense, 
The mariners then look up to me 

For the soundest weather sense ; 
For I'm full to the muzzle with equine lore, 

And I don't tell half I know, 
So I never hoist up my little red flag 

Until it begins to blow. 

The winds may howl and the showers fall 

In the roughest way, you see, 
And then 'tis whispered around by all, 

" He's smart, that McAdie." 
But though the mists may clear away, 

Along the horizon's line, 
•Still I never send up my little white flag 

Till the sun begins to shine. 

* * * 

A party of ban vivants were discussing in a snug 
corner of the Bohemian Club this week good things to 
eat, and things to let alone. 

"I must say," declared President Horace Piatt, "that 
tripe et la ramie de caen is a favorite dish of mine." 

"And of mine," chipped in Edgar Mizner. "I could eat 
it every day in the week, and never tire of it." 

" "Tis a French dish, ain't it?" inquired Osgood Hooker. 

At this juncture Explorer Jere Lynch joined the group. 

"We were talking about tripe a la modi' de cacti, Jere," 
said Mr. Piatt. "What do you think of it. What does it 
mean, anyhow?" 

Mr. Lynch cleared his throat by the portentous cough 
ere he replied: "Fripecb la mode de camp," he announced, 
"is so called because it is easily cooked in camp, and many 
a time and oft have I revelled in it when reclining in my 
tent on the delta of the Nile." 

There was an ominous pause for a moment. 

"Perhaps you are right, Jere," said Mr. Foster, who 
has travelled much himself, "but I confess I was under the 
impression it took its name from the town of Caen, m 
France." 

"A popular error, Charles," replied Mr. Lynch, gravely; 
"don't be fooled by it." A large blue fly lit on the case of 
the Egyptian mummy, as Mr. Lynch lazily lit a cigarette. 

* * * 

In all the churches did the prayers ascend, 
" To Robert Ingersoll conversion send; 
" His stony heart with sharp contrition rend, 
" Lest he to depths below at last descend." 

To which the doughty Robert makes reply : 
" 'Tis just the same, my friends— both you and I 
" Work in the vineyard as the years go by, 
" What you affirm, I must fain deny. 
" But underneath it all the dollars gleam, 
" The zealot's goal, the stout agnostic's dream." 

Belief or disbelief, in either case, 

Holds only, sad, indeed, the second place. 

* * * 

The denizens of Mill Valley are confidently awaiting the 
arrival of Irish thrushes, Cork blackbirds, and English 
skylarks, which that eminent jurist, Judge Tom Fottrell, 
has promised them. Sausalito turns up her nose at the 
pretensions of her rival, and cackles, with a sneer of 
supreme indifference, "You can have your thrushes and 
skylarks; seagulls are good enough for us." 



There has been fierce combat in the Italian colony again, 
and Signor Cevasco, the editor of the Voce del Popolo, won 
a victory over his contemporary, the rival journal. A 
solemn committee of the six most prominent Italians in the 
city handed him over the sum of one hundred dollars last 
Monday, as the result of a bet. The wager involved the 
accusation by the Italia that the Voce del Popolo did not 
have correct news from the Abyssian war — which is an all- 
absorbing theme in the Latin Quarter nowadays. But 
Cevasco has worked too long in company with the best 
New York and San Francisco journalists, and he had all 
along managed to have telegrams from New York and 
cables from Rome that were genuine — though they cost 
money. Wednesday he gave a dinner to American and 
Italian newspapermen. The one hundred dollars he turned 
over to the benevolent fund of the colony. 
* # * 

The Salvation lassies are not all good looking. There is 
one of whose face it would be gallant to say "that it would 
stop a clock." 

Oh, grim-eyed daughter of salvation, 
Were angels made at all like thee, 
Then better far that situation 

Where Satan's coals are furnished free. 



Better, like Judas to remain, 

Upon a fry-pan bound forever, 

Than roam with thee Elysian plain 
That overlooks the Stygian river. 



Under the new regime the Union League Club has taken 
on a greater popularity than ever. Including as it does 
some of the foremost men among the Republicans in its 
membership list — such as ex-President Harrison and Wil- 
liam McKinley — the four hundred leading gentlemen in the 
party in this State who give allegiance to the Union 
League are typical of the best social, political, and busi- 
ness portion of our city and State. The election of Colonel 
George Stone, on the first of the year, as President, served 
to renew the enthusiasm and unity of the organization. 

* # * 

Only a little pimple; 

On the tip of my sweetheart's nose, 
Only a cunning dimple 

Red as the rose that blows ; 
Only a streak on her downy cheek 

Blue as forget-me-not, 
But, alas, I know chat those signals show 

My sweet-heart is fond of the " bot." 

* # * 

Aleck Badlam used to be a great sufferer from 
rheumatism and many years ago was persuaded to try one 
of the many springs famous for their mud baths. When 
he came back rejuvenated his friends congratulated him 
on his recovery and asked him how he liked the treatment. 
"Two hundred and forty dollars me boys," smiled the 
great Assessor, "but I'll never do it again." Mud baths? 
"Oh no! The next time I get rheumatism I'll manage to 
sit in a first class sewer in San Francisco for four hours a 
day. Wouldn't cost anything and the treatment exactly 
the same." 

* # # 

The Santa Cruz editors, fighting for the penny, 
Clawed, and rough and tumbled like the felines of Kilkenny, 
Of elbow grease and energy this was a sinful waste, 
More is made to boil the pot with scissors and with paste. 

* * * 

Charles Rollo Peters occasionally runs up from his Mon- 
terey hacienda to pay his respects to the Bohemian owl. 
He is putting on canvas his impressions of that picturesque 
coast, and has adorned his studio with rare tapestries and 
odds and ends picked up in remote quarters in Europe. 
Over the open fireplace hangs a big iron pot, which Mr. 
Peters at restful intervals uses for experimenting in 
Spanish stews. 

Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 



The Maison Tortoni has been having a number of improvements 
made recently. The new decorations and marble floor are quite in 
keeping with the admirable cuisine. 



February «. 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS I.I. I 



THE STUFF THAT MAKES YOUNG MANHOOD. 

RKV ; | Parkhurst, D. D.. inTl.- 

Journal for Fehni.u me forolbli 

I have watched a good many brooding liens, but 1 oerer 
saw one facilitate the hatching process by pecking tin- 
shell. The chick on the ins worth 

it. 
More men are iujured by having things made ea 

them than by having their path beset with difliculti. 
it encoorag 1 stay themselves on circumstances, 

whereas their supreme reliance Deeds to be on their own 
personal stuff. 

The less a young man talks about luck and untoward- 
ness of circumstances, and the OOquettishness of popular 
favor, aud the like, the better for him and tor the world to 
which he owes himself. Every man will have all the power 
he earns, and the power that lie has will tell, not because 
people like it or like him. but because it is power. 

Personal pressure can no more be hooted down, or voted 
down, or argued out of existence than can the push of the 
wind or the_pu.ll of the moon. If you weigh a ton you will 
exert a ton's pressure. 

There is probably such a thing as genius, although ninety- 
nine hundredths of it is doubtless the name which lazy 
people give to results which others have earned by hard 
work in those hours when the lazy people themselves were 
either sleeping or wishing they could gain it without toiling 
for it. 

There is faculty enough in almost anybody to become 
genius if only all that faculty were lumped. 

We are more likely to find a good destiny by going afoot 
than by riding. 

The world cares very little for experts, and the course 
of events is only infinitesimally determined by them. 

Sowing still antedates reaping, and the amount sowed 
determines pretty closely the size of the harvest. 

Empty barns in October are the logical sequence of 
empty furrows in spring. The young man may as well 
understand that there are no gratuities in this life, and 
that success is never reached "across lots." 



THE "PATE DE FOIE GRAS.' 



THE first experiment mp&ti de foie gras was due to the 
inspiration of a cook in the service of Marshal de 
Contades, Governor of Alsace — the same general who lost 
the battle of Rossbach against Frederic II. of Prussia. 
This cook, whose name was Clauss, first conceived the 
high destiny of goose liver in the pastry business. His 
pates met with great success, and when, in 1790, the 
Marshal left Strasburg, Clauss hastened to marry the 
widow of a cake baker, and hung out his sign as a 
fabricant de pates. But very soon he found a competitor 
in the pastry line by the name of Doyen, who had the 
happy thought of adding Perigord truffles to his liver 
tarts. It was a stroke of genius which has never been im- 
proved upon since. After that this particular industry 
assumed immense proportions and made the fortunes of 
several noted families in that line. Strasburg exports 
annually more than 100,000 pates in tureens alone. "The 
canning begins late in October and ends about April 1st. 
It is claimed that the most delicate livers come from geese 
that have never laid an egg. 

THE brick composition which the Syrians and Egyptians 
used for their letters was largely composed of alum- 
inum, so modern chemists have decided. In the British 
Museum may be found numbers of specimens of these light 
and portable messages of communication. Our modern 
pure aluminum is derived from a certain clay, and un- 
doubtedly the lightness and durability of these bricks was 
due to that metal's presence. 

One of the most famous men in tne United States is Editor Murat 
Halstead of the Cincinnati Commercial. He is also said to be among 
the most abstemious, for he never drinks save three times a day— 
and then just a pony glass of his favorite Old Saratoga whiskey. 
Claret or wine does not agree with him. 

It is more difficult to secure genuine old Japanese vases and 
bronzes nowadays in Japan than it is to buy them from George T. 
Marsh & Co., at 625 Market street, under the Palace Hotel. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 




-r 



TT is to be hoped now 
that men have had a 
practical illustration of how deftly the society women can 
do the waiter girl in a beer garden they — the men — will 
give the preference to the upper circles every time when in 
quest of a glass of the foamy. Society owes a deep debt 
of gratitude to the effort in their behalf of the charming 
young matrons of Taylor street. Apropos of which even- 
ing, what a very lovely picture Miss Helen Boss made; her 
clear-cut, refined features and blonde hair being a delight 
in itself to gaze upon, even without the artistic pose and 
"setting." As a chocolatier, Miss Bertha Smith was es- 
pecially "fetching," her slender, graceful figure showing 
to great advantage in the dress. Men, as a rule, look 
stiff and self-conscious in tableaux, and the girls-spoiled 
darling, "Addie," was no exception to the rule; his air of 
"wish it was over " was decidedly amusing. 
* * * 

One of the prettiest (and most recently made) young 
matrons of the swim got off rather a good one the other 
evening at the theatre — quite up to Miss Laura, it was. 
Seeing a pretty girl not far off with Messrs. Smith and 
Tompkins in her party, the young matron said to the man 

next her: "Look at Miss ; poor girl, she is in as bad 

a fix as John Hays Hammond." "How 's that ? " was the 
naturalquery. •' Why, don't you see, she is surrounded 
by Bores." 

* * * 

The illness of Ed. Greenway was a capital chance for 
families whose social aspirations are higher than their 
claims, to get in their work by sending flowers, jellies, and 
dainties generally, to the sick-room. These people should 
remember there is no truer aphorism than that "eaten 
bread is soon forgotten," and the chances are they will be 
as coldly and calmly ignored in the matter of cards for the 
cotillion in the future as they have been in the past. 

* * * 

Of all the masks and dominoes at the Burton leap year 
dance this week none created more stir than the white 
nun-like one with the hood. She literally seemed to be 
here, there, and everywhere in an instant, and her famil- 
iarity with the officers' affairs was actually startling. 
Some one set the idea going that it was a former resident 
at the post — now a divorcSe — who had slipped in. 

* * * 

Several funny incidents took place that evening. One 
young officer whose tender feelings for a pretty bud have 
not yet found expression in speech, took the opportunity 
of whispering to a domino strongly resembling the girl in 
question, that it was not strange that she was such a good 
player of "Jenkins," for she always knew whose hancfhad 
coin in it; and then the young man was utterly dismayed 
when the unmasking came to find he had made a decided 
mis-lick. Some of the girls found it very difficult to con- 
ceal their identity, even under a mask. Miss Grace Sa- 
bine's tall figure was spotted at once, and one of the sol- 
dier beaux had a good deal of fun at her expense, they say. 

* * * 

It was a perfect delight to the women to see the old time 
fashion of giving pretty favors in the cotillion revived by 
George Newhall at his german on Wednesday evening. 
But then the dear creatures should remember it is only 
wealthy young men who can afford to indulge in such trifles. 

* * * 

The latest parlor game popular in society is known as 
the "coffee pot." It is a guessing pastime, and the knack 
lies in guessing a word for which the coffee pot is used as a 
substitute. To endeavor to explain it on paper would 
turn one's hair grav. 

* * * 

Ned Townsend and his accomplished wife leave for the 
East on Monday, after a delightful visit to their old home. 
Ned protests that California is the only country worth liv- 
ing in. He is laying the keel of a new novel. 



WALTER BAKER & GO., Ma 

Established Dorchester, Mass., 1780. 

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The Latest Fall and Winter Goods 
have arrived. 



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a Specialty 

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Mezzanine B. , Crocker Building. (Up one-half flight fronting on Post St.) 



Brandt. & Go. 



FINE TAILORING 
139 Montgomery St. 



Wall Paper. 

Our new stock for the season 1895-06 is now arriving. 

Elegant Designs and Colorings. 
G. W. Clark & Co., 653-655 Market Street. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co 







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For sale by all first-class Wine 
Merchants and Grocers 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 123 California St 



February I, 1896. 



FRANCISCO NF.WS LETTER 



A GLIMPSE OF THE FOYER OE OANSE, GRAND OPERA. 
Bt Hesky BlirBLOW, Illustrated bjr Kdouird Ciiruel P 

WHEN Oliver mer- 

icans died they 
fur from t; mark at wh: have 

shot at with their barbed or bhr b air. \> 

Lonfrfellow would tell, the poets find them OOCe in a while 
in the " heart of a tree "—found by a friend. 

But when Holmes was in Paris— so many years af 
ot the Paris of to-day. Longfellow's OutreMer" 
■inance that is like a bit of faded tap far as 

life is concerned scented with orris and camphor. 

However, the good healthy work in French art which 
first Millet developed and then filing open the gates 
for freedom in composition and color, did more for 
men like the great Bonlanger, who adorned that marvel- 
■ rncture of modern times, the Grand < >pera House, in 
the Place de 1' Opera, in Paris, than most people, not- 
withstanding the variance of their style. 

The great sculptors added their splendid memorials to 
the famous composers of France. 

A grand ball at the "opera " means everything to the 
Pari< clubman; also to the English and American visitor, 
and they form a large proportion of the participants. 

The swell club in Paris for Americans is the "Cercle 
Lincoln," of which yobug Maekay (who was thrown from 
his horse and killed) was a member, and they always turn 
out the United States colony in full force when the Grand 
Opera ball occurs. 

But theu — alas, they don't as a rule meet the lovely fair 
ones whom they have adored through lorgnettes! Nay! nay! 

It must be remembered that a danseuse 'is not so very 
well paid in the grand ballet of the Opera House — but 
then she has been educated at the nation's expense in the 
1 '.,„.<, ruatoire, and perhaps before her graduation she has 
readily found the golden butter for her pain maigre some- 
times, and often Valenciennes lace and diamonds or pearls. 

Launched on that turbulent sea, the hallo of the 
Grand Opera House, in Paris, the young graduate is a 
mere figurante, but nevertheless she will be more sought 
after than the cocotte, who rides past the Pare Monceau 
of a morning. 

They say that one girl out of ten in the Grand Opera 
ballet ever marries — and that then she weds a tailor, as 
Madame Judic did, "just to save expenses!" 

Admission to the presence of the grand ballet in the 
Opera is magnificently difficult — behind the scenes or any- 
where else. Artists, composers, authors, sculptors, and 
men of fame in newspaperdom may receive the grace 
which is courtesy and not scant. But beware! The bal- 
lerina of the Grand Opera never lets fools rush in where 
angels fear to tread — unless she finds out first that they 
may be " angels " in disguise! 

The beautiful drawing of Mr. Cucuel represents vividly 
the Foyer de Danse of the opera. There are various sorts 
of foyers in the Parisian theatres. With Americans the 
word "foyer" means the nolle iV entrance, or, rather, the 
space behind the auditorium where the ladies remove their 
wraps, and where, once and awhile, gentlemen linger be- 
tween acts. But in Paris there is almost always a swell 
"green room," after a custom of tradition. I believe the 
girls in the ballet call theirs a mile d'attente, which means 
" half reception and half rendezvous." 

One of the daintiest is at the Palais Royal, a play house 
which, to my mind, possesses the most exquisite interior 
decorations of any other theatre in the world. The grand 
foyer is adorned by the most famous painters of the days 
of Louis Quinze and Louis Seize. The actors' reception 
room is a dream of beauty. 

Of course, the Comedie Francaise has the most famous 
"green room," and, undoubtedly, its public foyer far 
excels that of the Opera in the matter of historical associ- 
ation and — by all mean,, in the sculptor's art. 

But for the gilded youth who has had a gilt-edged intro- 
duction, whether he be French, English, or American, the 
Foyer de Danse of the Opera will, as a rule, cost him all his 
millions of francs as well as a sad heart before he says 
good-bye to it. 



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will find it admirable. 



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CLEARANCE SALE of 



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FINE SHOES 

Nolan Bros. 

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Broo^lyr? 
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Conducted on both tfle 

European and 
American plan 

Bush street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F. 
This favorite hotel is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Family and Busi- 
ness Men's Hotel in San Francisco Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, 
first-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room: Per day. $1 25, $1.50. $1.75 and $2; per week, $7 to $13; 
per month, $27.50 to $40; single room, 50 cents to $1. 

4®~Free coach to and from the Hotel. 



RIGGS HOUSE 



; Washington, D. C. 

The Hotel " Far Excellence " — ■ — — ■=■ 

of the National Capital. First-class in 
all appointments. O G. STAPLES, 
President; G. DeWITT, Treas. 



American plan, $3 per day and upward. 



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WASHINGTON, D. C. 
H C BTJRCH. Manager. 



POPULAR PRICES— Regular rates. $4 per day up. Fifty rooms 
on the sixth floor with steam heat and electric light, reduced to 
$2 50 and $3 per day. Fifty rooms on other Qoors reduced from 
$4 to $3 50 per day. Parlors and alcove parlors at equally low 
rates. Special rates for the Army and Navy Officers and the 
Clergy. 



Occidental Hotel, 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, manager. 



San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




February i, 1896. 



Properly managed, the new Gold Mining 
A Useful Exchange will be of unquestionable benefit 
Institution, to this community in the respect of stamping 

fraud upon the schemes of charlatans in the 
business. Every adventurer thinks that he or she has the 
privilege of posing as full-fledged experts when every 
other avenue of profit fails, and the lying prospectus 
built up to trap guileless people with money bespeaks the 
qualifications of the concoctor for a life cell in the State 
Penitentiary. Not a few of these miserable swindles are 
floating about the city and State at present. Working 
men aud women are being approached and solicited to sub- 
scribe for shares in mines where millions can be had simply 
for the trouble of picking them up. The sooner the Ex- 
change gets to work the better, and in this branch of the 
business it will have a grand mission to perform. Before in- 
vesting a dollar in any scheme, the investor approached by 
outside schemers, male or female, should then and there re- 
fer the proposition to the Exchange for information and 
guidance, and anything' it refuses to endorse had better be 
dropped right away. People who have recently bought 
into private companies should at once put themselves in 
communication with the officers of the Exchange, and 
there is no doubt that they will only be too glad to pass 
upon matters of the kind in a general way for the pro- 
tection of the public. Prom what we can learn, there are 
some schemers at work in the community who should be 
brought up with a round turn. The only way to track 
them is for investors to come forward, and any communi- 
cation forwarded to this paper will be promptly dealt with 
in the way of throwing light upon the venture. 

The market on Pine street has been ex- 
Comstock ceedingly dull during the week, and that 
Mining Shares, prices are firm is about all that can be 
said. There is only one man to-day on 
the street to whom any credit can be given for sustaining 
the flickering life of the Comstock. Had it not been for 
the single and comparatively unsustained efforts of Her- 
man Zadig, the Comstock would long ago have dropped 
into obscurity. There is no use in attempting to deny this 
proposition in any quarter. Credit must be given where 
it is fairly due, and in this particular case Zadig is the 
man who has worked und labored day in and day out to 
bolster up the fading fortunes of the old lode. If his spir- 
ited action could only inspire others to come in and do 
likewise, what a change would take place in the situation. 
Instead of that, however, they are quite ready to follow 
in his lead, content with the dime or two which can be 
picked on each rally in a stock which he may engineer. 
Fortune has favored Zadig in his exertions. Prom time to 
time some opportune strike has helped him to pull victory 
from defeat, and in Occidental the latest timely occurrence 
of an ore body has worked wonders in restoring public 
confidence in the situation. This property is looking ex- 
ceptionally well in the 650-level, and while the manage- 
ment are cautious in the reports they issue of the develop- 
ment as work progresses, they express the hope that the 
mine will yet repay the fidelity of the stockholders, who 
have stayed by it so pluckily for years past. If the South 
and North-end managers would only step into the breach 
and "assist," old times might be confidently expected on 
the street. Silver King was assessed 25 cents and Andes 
15 cents during the week. 

This is the way the Amador Republican 
"The Wildest heads up au editorial denunciatory of a 
of Wild-Cats." recent incorporation, described as the 
Jackson Gold Mining and Milling Com- 
pany, with a capital stock of $750,000, of which twen.ty- 
five dollars has been paid. If what our esteemed contem- 
porary says in regard to the intentions of the company is 
correct, and it must have good reasons for the assertion, 
the gentlemen who conceived the scheme should be awarded 
the banner for their unparalleled cheek. It is claimed that 
two mining locations made by them covering the claim of 
the subsequent incorporation, covers the entire business 
■ location of the main street of the town. "Within the 



boundaries of these claims," says the Republican, " there 
is not a foot of vacant ground upon which the locators 
could claim the shadow of a right to post a notice, much 
less to search for mineral. Townsite deeds cover the whole 
territory. * * * Many of the lots have been sold over 
and over again. Innocent purchasers have intervened, in 
many cases paying fancy prices for their property. The 
total value of the property affected will run up into hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars. It is true, one location, the 
Better Hope, existed anterior to the townsite patent, and 
there is little doubt, had the locator taken the necessary 
steps to protect his interests, his right to mine for the 
precious metal within the limits of his location, would not 
have been infringed upon by the town site. * * * The 
purpose is to sell stock to whoever is green enough to buy, 
and efforts to that end are reported to have already been 
made in Jackson. * * * This is the wildest kind of 
wild-catism. Nothing can be more prejudicial to the inter- 
ests of a mining section than to have such rank schemes 
flaunted in the face of the public. In protection of the 
reputation of this community, and in defense of a rich field 
for legitimate mining operations, we protest against such 
ventures to work the pockets of the credulous." It is cer- 
tain, however, that the locators, whoever they are, will 
lose nothing by their venture in the long run. If they are 
going to mine, it will take a long and expensive litigation 
to stop them, and it will be cheaper in the long run to buy 
off the corporation than to fight it through the courts. It 
would seem from this view that there is financial possi- 
bility in the scheme, mine or no mine. The outcome will 
be awaited with much interest by the mining element in 
the community, who might, at first thought, believe the 
whole matter to be a financial joke. 

Since our last issue there has been a de- 

New York cided change in the tone of the New York 

Stocks. stock market. Prices, however, have not 

been advanced rapidly, but there has been a 
steady improvement from day to day. The decline in 
sterling has checked the exports of gold, which has re- 
stored confidence to a large degree. Investors are again 
entering our market as buyers on a good scale, and all 
dividend paying stocks are in good demand. The Grangers 
show a good advance, as well as Reading and Jersey Cen- 
tral; in fact, the entire list shows a substantial improve- 
ment. Jersey Central has probably shown the best gain, 
the improvement during the week being J per cent. 
Reading Central advanced 5} per cent., and Mauhattan 4| 
per cent. Industrials have shown a very light improve- 
ment, except the more active. Sugar sold 6| per cent, 
higher. Gas, Tobacco, Distilleries, Leather, and Electric 
show strength, and prices have greatly improved. The 
outlook appears most encouraging, and unless some un- 
foreseen accident occurs greater improvement will take 
place again next week. 

Professor Thomas Price has been lately en- 
gaged as expert in the mining suit at 
Grass Valley, in which Mr. Ford sues the 
North Star Company for a quarter million 
of dollars. Professor Price appears for Ford, and his tes- 
timony was, as usual, clear and concisive on the points at 
issue. The case is a most difficult one from a mining, as 
well as a legal standpoint. A magnificent working model, 
showing the lower workings of the property, shows the 
former. The ledges throughout the vast territory covered 
by the North Star operations are all blind, while only a 
very small extent of the ground is under patent. 



A Heavy 
Mining Suit. 



The veracity of the average press dis- 

Mr. Hammond's patches can now be correctly gauged by 

Condition. the reports from Africa regarding John 

Hays Hammond. One day he is safe 

and hearty; the next he is in a pitiable condition. In the 

meantime one half of the country has been able to make 

the fact known that they are on the most intimate terms 

with the distinguished mming engineer. If the truth were 

known, the majority of the uncalled for interference is from 

people who have never even had the honor of meeting the 

gentleman, let alone to possess a speaking acquaintance 

with him. 

M. P. SHAW has just retui-ned from attending the 
annual meeting of the Cortez Mines, Limited, in Lon- 



w 

don. 



I, 1896. 




SAN PRANCISCO tVBWS I.KITHR. 



•t)oclb»l wtllpltj tbedotll «lr. with y. 



TH F. little town of Haywards has learned the <litT. • 
Ity, and the real stuff, as 
in Nature's dynamo. In i 1 the pravera 

_■ wheat raisers of the State, 11 • 
of heaven. 1st S iiyaft.Tno.in. after the churches were 
emptied, r . of storm clouds, and began to 

no pretty One work in the way of drenching the 
soil, already drunk from over-much imbibing. It was a 
holiday, and there didn't seem to l>o much else to do but 
rinkle the wheat fields. About that time old Light- 
ning himself, who had been quiet for a good many months, 
awoke to the situation and the fun. and. observing a little 
structure made for the brewing of the electrical iTuid, but 
unprotected by any of the ordinary safeguards from the 
stranger, made for its very heart with its 
usual thoughtless activity. It was like a giant trying to 
get into a cradle. It made for the dynamo and the coils 
and appurtenauces. just as the electrician on duty had for 
a moment stepped into a side room. There was a Bash— by 
no means a flash in a pan — a dash, a crash. When the 
electrician returned, "all the lights in the town had gone 
out. the machinery was burst wide open, and darkness 
prevailed. The lightning, that was so fractious that 
Heaven couldn't keep it under control in its own storage 
battery, had played the dickens with everything it touched, 
decamped instantaneously to the deuce only knows where, 
and left everything in darkness. There's a moral in the 
thing if you are only smart enough to harness it and keep 
it for every day use. A part of it is that birds of a feather 
flock together, and that Lightning, the elder brother, 
takes kindly to young Electricity by natural affinity, and 
that if you hold a pipe under Niagara, it will get full imme- 
diately, and maybe burst. The people of Hay wards, when 
they repair things, will probably add to their plant a few 
lightning arresters, and then the next frolic of that kind 
will doubtless be elsewhere. 

THE fact really seems to be that the Truth is mighty, 
and will get there. A little while ago the Reverend 
V. Marshal Law got up on his hind legs and barked, be- 
cause he wanted the Communion service administered in a 
little less democratic fashion. The Kanakas may eat poi 
out of the same dish, but that furnished no reason why 
Christians should drink to each other's everlasting salva- 
tion out of the same cup at the Communion. Microbes, go 
to church like other people, and may thoughtlessly par- 
take of the Lord's wine, and even take a bath therein, 
ready to be rescued by the next participant, and make a 
landing on his or her upper lip. The Reverend Law reasoned 
that he didn't care to have the microbe, that sent his 
wicked sister to hell, with unreasonable partiality and 
speed send him to heaven, even when he was drinking his 
wine for God's sake. So the Reverend Law fired away on 
that theme, but they outvoted him, and hinted that the 
Lord would look out for his own, and that individual cups 
were needless. It savored more of science than sentiment. 
But the truth is mighty, and so forth. The worshippers 
in the Ross-street Presbyterian Church, in Brooklyn, last 
Sunday were surprised by their deacons tendering them 
each a cup at communion. The verdict was universal ap- 
proval, but with no audible mention of microbes. The 
ball has started. It is an even wager that the Reverend 
Law will now say: "I told you so," and will start in on a 
new campaign. The chances are, then, that before the 
Reverend Brown gets back into his pulpit again, or Mrs. 
Mary Abbott Davidson gets out of jail, every good Christ- 
ian can drink to his soul's health in an individual cup, and 
that he will drink deep, and possibly a bumper every 
time. We congratulate the Reverend Law. It seems like 
a great triumph. 

NO wonder the Supreme Court lectures our law-makers. 
How are they supposed to know whether a legisla- 
tive act is constitutional when they have never read the 
Constitution? AE the constitutions they know of are their 
own, and them they generally lose in Sacramento. 



13 

■ 

luld !»• delightful I 
die member of tl oving guild thai 

ponsiblllty to which it « 
the day of judgment. Before we arrive al thi 
we have to be nauseated by it* daily nutriment, most of us 
taught that to In- honest Is t<> in' honored, and that to 
oheat la to i*- a knave. An unfortunate few grot* up 
without a single idea of morality, and they land in the 
jails and prisons. It Is cowardly and contemptible to 
teach children to play tricks on a company , as if enmity 

could justify knavery. No man of any sense of .1 

will accept from n newsboy a ticket that he does not pay 
for. for he knows i». thereby cheats the carrier out of a 
fare, The newspaper that encourages such tricks is do 
better than a moral pest, for it benumbs the sense of hon- 
esty iu the boj and the man alike. Whoever takes a t inns 

fer to give a newsboy Is a party to the conspiracy, and the 
man who justifies it will steal your money the first oppor 
tunity he gets, on the pica that In- believes you have 
charged too much for that which brought it to you. For 
Heaven's sake. Ictus exercise common honesty, and if you 
wish to light a big company for any wrong it. has done you, 
fight it like a man, and not like a petty thief. 

THE Duke of Marlborough is. evidently, going to be 
always on hand to make great financial masterstrokes, 
else why be the descendent of the great Duke, who loved 
money marvelously. The new Duke's first coup was taking 
to wife Cousuelo, the rich man's daughter, blind to her 
faults, but shrewdly alive to her virtues — that is, her mil- 
lions — to get. With the income vouchsafed her by her 
rich dad, the Duke saw that it was possible to keep Blen- 
heim on its legs, and keep himself and spouse at a decent 
distance from the poor-house. Now, the Duke has enjoyed 
his wife and her fortune long enough to be perfectly sure 
that if she should suddenly quit this sphere, around which 
the English drum beat is forever heard, and go to dwell 
among the angels, the income might cease, and he be left 
in a cold world without consolation or coin, which are much 
the same thing. His second coup has, accordingly, revealed 
itself in his consent to an application by Consuelo for a life 
insurance for §3, 000, 000, payable to her surviving husband. 
The premium for this instrument will, of course, be paid 
out of the Vanderbilt coffers. This, we submit, is a financial 
masterstroke. It assures all the spoils of his victory, 
over himself, in descending from the impecunious condition 
of an English aristocrat to marry a gilded daughter of 
democracy. If Consuelo dies, she will still live in memory 
as long as American gold buys flowers for her grave, and 
sings her requiem. 

IT seems perfectly proper for us to keep on the right side 
of society in our Queen City of the Par West, by letting 
it know that we have heard that Mr. Ward McAllister 
G-reenway is under the care of the doctors, and faithful as 
he has long been to all possible accommodations here to the 
example of his namesake in New York, that he may 
yet, willy-nilly, still further follow his footsteps and 
retire permanently from earthly society, and take 
up his seat at the side of the great white throne, 
now presumably occupied by the aforesaid Ward. 
It is fair to presume that anybody who occupies 
a high seat down below, is not going to put up with a 
low seat up above, and that the heads of society here are 
not going to be the tails of society there. But perhaps 
we are going too far. We beg the learned doctors who 
are feeding the fires of life in Mr. Greenway to keep up the 
supply of fuel, and be quick about leading their ward 
speedily forth into the sunshine. So will society smile and 
drink his health in his own brand of champagne. 

EDITOR Lee Pairchild of St. Helena is learning that 
one can hardly be a big man in a small town. Pair- 
child's wit, which is not unfrequently made keen by satire, 
is getting him into trouble with physicians, mayors, and 
what-not. He has probably already noted the difference 
between a town and a city, and that it is the safer to be 
where people are too numerous to know one another or to 
care who's who or who is n't. 

" DEER will go up," says a contemporary. This must 
\J be a new kind of stuff. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Februaiy I, 1896. 



A Book of There is no incident associated with the Civil 
the War that is better known than ihe cruise of 

Week.* the Alabama. From the day that ship "es- 
caped" from Laird's shipbuilding yard at 
Birkenhead to the day she was sent to the bottom outside 
Cherbourg, the Alabama occupied the attention of the 
world as much, perhaps, as any ship thai ever sailed the 
ocean. No matter whether we regard her as a mere 
rover-of-the-seas or as a duly commissioned man-of-war 
from a properly established Government, the fact of her 
world-wide notoriety remains unchallenged, and the inter- 
est taken in her whereabouts was only second to the news 
of a decisive engagement. That she deserved that noto- 
riety the book before us authoritatively proves, and it is 
for the readers to consider, apart from all political senti- 
ments and viewed coldly as a matter of manliness and 
honor, whether Captain Semmes and the men under him 
should, on the authority of this book, go down to history 
as a lot of freebooting assassins, moderate privateers, or 
as honorable combatants fighting in a cause they had hon- 
estly espoused. And after thirty years of peace Ameri- 
cans can look at this question on its merits, without pas- 
sion, and unmoved by sectional animosities. They can 
accept the efforts made by the South to create a fleet of 
commerce destroyers as a judicious policy on their part to 
help them in their efforts to raise the blockade by causing 
the withdrawal of some of our men-of-war from our coast 
line and sending them in pursuit of the Southern vessels. 
We must admit, too, that Captain Semmes was right in 
avoiding our men-of-war as much as possible, for his mis- 
sion was to get as many of our ships as he could to pursue 
him, and he could do this best by playing the part of a Fly- 
ing Dutchman, but giving shot, shell, and the torch for 
such of our merchantmen as she caught on the high seas. 
On those points Americans are, we believe, agreed, and 
they would be placed beyond discussion if this book, writ- 
ten by one of the officers of the ship, had not made an au- 
thoritative statement, on one point, that will re-open 
the question whether or not Captain Semmes was a cow- 
ardly butcher or gallant sailor. In fact, if we had not no- 
ticed that the book had been written by one of the officers 
of the ship we would not have read it at all. We would 
have put it away as superfluous, just as we would put away 
our A B C's or our numerals. There is nothing new in the 
book, not a line, but we have authority, and, as far as we 
remember, we cannot recall an authoritative statement on 
the Southern side of the most questionable event in the 
career of the Alabama via the sinking of the Hatteras, 
and it was to find out how Lieutenant Sinclair would ac- 
count for that incident that we read the book at all. We 
wanted to get his side of the Hatteras affair, and this in- 
duced us to open the book, and here is what he says: 

"It is dark, the enemy being indistinctly seen. * * * 
The enemy has now come up. She hails us: 'What ship is 
that? ' ' This is Her Britannic Majesty's steamer Petrel ' 
is the reply. * * * Our crew have lock-strings in 
hand, keeping the guns trained on her, and awaiting the 
command to fire. The two vessels are so near that con- 
versation in ordinary tones can be easily heard from one to 
the other. For a time the Hatteras people seem to be 
consulting. Finally they hailed again. ' If you please, I'll 
send a boat on board of you,' to which our executive officer 
replied: 'Certainly, we shall be pleased to receive your 
boat.' When the boat was half way between the two ves- 
sels the signal was given, and the sky and water were 
lighted up by our broadside. About six broadsides -were 
given by us. The enemy replied irregularly. Then she 
fired a lee gun, and we heard the quick, sharp hail to sur- 
render, accompanied by the request that our boats be 
sent to her immediately, as she was sinking. The whole 
thing had passed so quickly that it seemed to us like a 
dream." 

We have often heard that "everything is fair in love and 
war," but even in face of this dictum we can fancv the face 



of many a chivalrous Southerner blush with shame at a 
confession such as this. The sinking of the Hatteras was 
not the result of strategy, but it was accomplished by low 
treachery unauthorized by any code of warfare known to 
the civilized world. It was not done in the spirit of the 
gallant South, nor do we believe such baseness ever re- 
ceived the sanction of the leaders of the rebellion. What- 
ever mistakes the South made, and they were many, we 
of the North to this day glory in the heroism and manli- 
ness with which the South defended its cause, and base 
treachery, such as marked this act of Captain Semmes, 
formed no part of the method of the South in its conduct 
of the war! The Hatteras was lured to destruction after 
the fashion of the pirate luring the merchantman, and 
that, too, in the dark, when the treachery was the least 
likely to be discovered. It is true the author of this book 
tells us that the Alabama — 

"Was a fighting ship, and under no reasonable odds 
contemplated avoiding battle." 

Yes, but how does he sustain his assertion? During the 
two years the Alabama was afloat she had only two en- 
counters with our men-of-war, and she frequently, and we 
think wisely, avoided battle when the odds were reason- 
able on one side or the other. And of those two occasions 
the Hatteras incident was one, and that cannot be called 
a battle any more than a knock-down blow that is given, 
without warning, by a big man to a small boy can be 
called a prize-fight. And the other occasion was when the 
Alabama was sent to the bottom by the guns of the Kear- 
sage, and here, indeed, Captain Semmes did something to 
atone for his cowardly attack on the Hatteras. We could 
forgive the Alabama for the fifty-seven American mer- 
chantmen she destroyed during her two years' cruise, par- 
ticularly as England paid us $6,750,000 for the damage 
done, but we find it much harder to forgive the baseness 
by which she threw the Hatteras off her guard, and this 
book, written by Lieutenant Sinclair, proves, to our mind, 
that Captain Semmes did not represent the true chivalry 
of the South at all. Otherwise the book has no literary 
merit; it is written in bad English, and the author im- 
presses us as being a man of very limited education. 

*"Two Years on the Alabama." By Arthur Sinclair, Lieutenant Con- 
federate Navy. With portraits and illustrations. 

" In the Hollow of the Hills," by Bret Harte, proves 
that that author is a natural story teller. Mr. Harte 
resembles Dickens in creating for himself the scenes in 
which his characters live, move, and have their being. The 
California of Mr. Harte is a land of melodramatic romance, 
a rogue's paradise, a fairyland of felons, and yet he makes 
it all so natural that we are half disposed to accept it as 
the California we know. 

If the " Hill Caves of Yucatan " unlocked the mysteries 
of the Maya stone monuments, and gave the world the key 
to the history of the early races of Central America, as 
the discovery of the Rosetta stone unlocked the history of 
ancient Egypt, the archaeologist world would have rejoiced, 
but it does not do this, and yet it is a book of absorbing 
interest, and will be extensively read by scientists. 

The London Speaker says that Mr. Grant Allen indulges 
in futile philosoph}', and that his "British Barbarians is 
" pretentious, dull, and ludicrously ineffective." The book 
is, the Speaker says, " an expression of the shallowest pre- 
tense of enlightenment." That Mr. Grant Allen deserves 
all this, and more, few weli-balanced minds will deny. 

"Matthew Furth," by Ida Lemon, is disappointing. She 
writes like a novice, and, where she should be funny she is 
not, and where she should be pathetic she is merely senti- 
mental and maudliu. All this is unpardonable in view of 
the material she had on hand, the London of Dickens, with 
its great literary possibilities. 

The danger of mob rule is graphically illustrated in 
"The Paris of Robespierre," when the servants threatened 
to denounce their employers as foes to the Republic if 
blackmail was not given to the men of the kitchen. 

McClure's Magazine has about fifty portraits of Lincoln. 
In fact, it has secured all the portraits of that states- 
man known to exist. > 

During the year just ended the New York Free Circu- 
lating Library circulated 654,451 volumes, an increase of 
18,318 over the circulation of the previous year. 



February : . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



OUR CLEVER MEN. 

Sso many .lever men thai it 
would be an erv n enumerate tl.. 

From the dub some are more prominent than otbei 

' a few of these that I lally treats 

In every branch of art. i .mm. culture ami the 

learned pr may boost Of repre- 

sentative men- Den who have grown with 

growth, have seen the rise and fall, and rise again, 
brought about by tire and financial disaster, of manv of 
her foremost — ing away of others from 

this list, such as Rata iir, Flood, and ( 1'Brien, 

kings of Bnance whose rapid rise to wealth and power 
surely entitled them to b, ••clever." and those 

philanthropists. Georf Charles Mayne, and Joseph 

and. It is of the living, however, that we speak, and 
can unquestionably cite Lloyd Tevis as the very bead and 
front representative of our clever men. who by his own un- 
aided energy and talent, his daring methods, and above all 
his indomitable will, has risen to be a power among us. 
Whether as a financier, a promoter of some vast organiza- 
tion, a holder of securities, or chief of corporations. Mr. 
Tevis alike is a brilliant, brainy, successful man. 

Another able financier is I. W. Hellman. of the Nevada 
Bank, who although compared with others a new- 
comer, has already made his influence felt in business cir- 
cles. Yet another banker of note is P. N. Lilienthal, in 
that he has risen by his own merit to be the head of one of 
our great banking institutions, thereby evidencing clever- 
ness of no small degree. Antoine Borel is of a different 
type than any of the above, being of a strictly conserva- 
tive method and not a speculator; his great executive 
ability in managing the large interests of his firm prove 
him to be a man of much mental power. 

Turning to the legal world — although, alas! many of our 
brightest minds are now gone from this sphere — there still 
remain a shining galaxy of brilliant men whose cleverness 
none can dispute, such as Reuben Lloyd, whose quiet and 
modest demeanor is a cloak for the clever mind within. 
D. M. Delmas, John Garber, Judge Boalt, and last, though 
by no means least, our own W. H. L. Barnes, whose men- 
tal capacity has never been doubted, and whose brilliant 
sallies when in repartee with the late Hall McAllister used 
to delight those who were in court. The paternal mantle 
has surely fallen upon the shoulders of our District Attor- 
ney, Will Barnes, Jr., who, although a young man as 
judged by the preceding, has already established his claim 
to being a very clever man. As a man of solid mental 
gifts, ex-Judge E. W. McKinstry merits place, his learn- 
ing being recognized in his appointment to the State Uni- 
versity. Horace Piatt is clever, not only in his profession 
as a lawyer, but in a drawing-room as a ladies' man. 

In the commercial world Claus Spreckels, the sugar 
king, is a prominent figure; his colossal fortune has been 
amassed by his own indefatigable industry, and the ability 
of his son,. John D. Spreckels, in guarding those millions, 
proves him a worthy second to his father. Surely no bet- 
ter exemplar of a clever man exists among us than J. D. 
Phelan. Although his large fortune came to him by in- 
heritance, his wise and philanthropic use of his millions has 
gained him hosts of admirers from, as Shakespeare says, 
all sorts of people, as not only is he clever in business 
methods, but as a lover and patron of art Mr. Phelan is at 
the head of our citizens, and socially he is equally popular. 
Irving Scott is a giant in mind and ability, though not in 
stature, his keen perception, quick grasp of a situation 
and energy of purpose making him unequaled in his own 
line. 

In the medical world, beyond all compare Dr. B. Beverly 
Cole takes front rank for his exceptionally brilliant mind, 
enriched by contact with the brightest men of other coun- 
tries as well as his own, extensive reading and deep re- 
search. In his profession Dr. Cole is considered an author- 
ity; he has gained honors in foreign colleges, and is re- 
garded by savants as a man of the century. A man whose 
modesty equals his learning (and that is saying a good 
deal) is Dr. L. C. Lane, whose philanthropy has given San 
Francisco a medical college unrivaled on this continent. 
As an exponent of the other school of Hahnemann's found- 
ing, unquestionably Dr. John N. Eckel takes the lead. A 
man of broad views, great experience, constant research, 



found thinki ikel is 

one of the • or men. l>r. Henry Gibbons 

Jr. hat in the footsteps of his 

gifted father As a bright scholar and successful p recti- 

r bis skill is acknowledged by "". k'' v '»K Mm front 
rank in hi* profession. In the treatment of nervou 
meats l>r. Hirsobfelder may be ranked as one of the ■ 
men of the day. In surgery Dr. Paola de Vecobl has de- 
cidedly made bis mark n!\ Barkan and Dr. Hopkins are 
notably clever in the line of optics, while as a den Ms I whose 
wonderful discoveries iii bis profession and equally wo 

ful SUCCeSS In practically applying them has made 

famous, who can rival in cleverness Dr, \V. .1. Young 
The church has so many bright exponents of the Faith 
red to the saints In all the different sects it, 

would be invidious to single OUt any one. although it is 

proper to say that Bishop Nichols of the Episcopal form 

of faith; Archbishop llionlan of the Romish; Rabbi Voor- 

sangerol the Hebrew; Dr. McKenzie of the Presbyterian, 

and Horatio Stebbinsof the Unitarian, are all represents 

tivo men among us. 

Of course these are by no means all our clever men; 
they are among the most notable as such, and are men of 
mark in our community. 

" 'T^HERE are but very few persons who know how to 
1 walk upstairs properly," says a well-known 
physician, as reported in The Scientific American. 
''Usually a person will tread on the ball of his foot in tak- 
ing each step, springing himself up to the next step. This 
is very tiresome and wearing on the muscles of the legs 
and feet. You should, in walking or climbing stairs, seek 
for the most equal distribution of the body's weight possi- 
ble. In walking upstairs your feet should be placed 
squarely down on the step, heel and all, and then the work 
should be performed slowly and deliberately. In this way 
there is no strain upon any particular muscle, but each 
one is doing its duty in a natural manner. The man who 
goes upstairs with a springing step you may be sure is no 
philosopher, or, at least, his reasoning has not been 
directed to that subject." 

A Sovereign Remedy— Dr. Parker's Cough Cure. One dose will stop a 
cough. It never fails. Try it. Price 2oc. George Dahlbender & Co., 
214 Kearny street. 

J Evans' 

* Ale 
* 

* 
* 
* 

4* 

* 



is the best, 
the purest, 
most wholesome, 
most healthful 

Drink to be found. 
Full of Life, 

Never flat. 
Bright and Sparkling, 

No Sediment. 
Rich as Cream, 

No false ferments. 
Bottled at the breivery by 
most improved methods. 

C. H. EVANS &. SONS, 

Hudson, New York. 
SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

S. F., Portland, Los Angeles. 

% 4* 4» 4$ 4*4* 444*4*4* 



# 



* 




George E. Hall, 



Agent and importer of 



-FOREIGN WINES. 



MUTUAL LIFE BUILDING, 223 Sansome St . 



MISS BOLTE'S SCHOOL. 



2297 SACRAMENTO ST. Board; English, French, German, 
piano ; $30 per month ; a chance par excellence for ambitious and 
conscientious parents to give their children superior education 
at low figure; coach; kindergarten 

Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican rem- 
edy; it gives health and strength to the Sexual rgans. Depot at 323 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. (Send for circular.) 



Weak flen and Women 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February I, 1896. 




N 



[EW YORK is stark, staring mad. on the 
bicycle question. Madison Square Gar- 
den, where erstwhile the noble horse was worshipped, is 
given over now to an exhibition of bicycles, bloomers and 
fanatics. Can you believe that over thirty thousand people 
crowded into the Garden the other night, and that last 
night disappointed crowds clamored for admission ? You 
might make a tour of the bicycle agencies with quite as 
much edification and less cost. But the bloomer girl is 
what wins, no doubt. I say what advisedly, for a bloomer 
woman ceases to deserve the soulful pronouns when she 
dons unwomanly attire. 

Have you heard in San Francisco of the legacy recently 
bestowed upon Mrs. Frank Daniels, formerly Bessie San- 
son? A kind uncle in England has left her fifteeu pounds 
a week for life. Is not that a windfall? Daniels' play is 
so successful at the Casino that his out of New York en- 
gagements were necessarily cancelled for many weeks. 
The Casino management has just made an innovation in the 
establishment of the Cabaret du Neant, an imitation of the 
celebrated Parisian resort of the same name. It is a grue- 
some place, hung with black and adorned with skulls and 
skeletons, and the convivially inclined dine from coffins held 
up by trestles. This is all supposed to be very fin de siecle 
and decadent, and the frequenters of the cafe are filled with 
the belief that they are truly defiers of fate and masters 
of death. 

The divine Sarah is here portraying the passion of Izeyl, 
a Hindoo, and as India is about the only country spared 
hitherto in the romantic drama, the play is attracting 
great attention. Bernhardt has grown positively pretty, 
and there is no longer any occasion for jest on the point of 
her slenderness. for she is round and symmetrical. 

New York surely offers everything just now, from grand 
opera to variety shows. There is every sort of attraction 
going on excepting a circus and an old-fashioned minstrel 
show. It is warm weather, too. The days are bright and 
sunny, and every one who would complain if it snowed com- 
plains now because it does not snow. 

Your old California friend, Major Selover, has been very 
much under the weather, and was confined for a few days 
to his apartment in the Park Avenue Hotel. Mrs. Walter 
Crosby, who has been at the Brunswick, is just about leav- 
ing for Washington, where she will spend the rest of the 
winter. Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell Scott Moore will sail on 
the Campania on the first, and will go at once to London- 
derry, their future home. 

The news of the death of Page 
Brown was a painful surprise here, 
where he had many warm friends and 
where his wife is widely known. Ar- 
thur Chalmers and Mrs. Chalmers, 
who were a part of the San Rafael 
colony for a few years, are now living 
in New York. Mr. Chalmers is study- 
ing medicine. 

The death of good old Tom Maguire 
has probably been wired to you, but I 
do not know if the sad story has 
reached you that he died in absolute 
want. I am sure that there are hun- 
dreds of his old friends who would 
gladly have helped him had they 
known the truth, but unfortunately 
these melancholy histories are rarely 
known in time. His spare figure, 
with his kindly face, his white hair 
and mustache, and his immaculately 
neat attire, made him a noticeable 
person in Broadway, and I believe he 
will be missed. 

Harry Widmer's widow, formerly 
Kate Mayhew, is to be benefited by a 
performance at Daly's, for which 
many prominent actors, actresses, 
and musicians have offered their aid. 



Her husband's sudden and untimely death left her quite 
without resources, and as she is a very popular woman 
every one is glad to help her on. 

Mrs. Willie Brown, as she must still be known, is at 
Asheville, North Carolina, accompanied by her daughter 
and her son. Miss Brown is to be married in June to Hugh 
Fleming, of Erie, Penn., who is young, handsome and rich. 
He is a Yale man, and was a classmate of Harry Hall, Miss 
Brown's cousin, at Yale. Mrs. Brown will return to her 
Madison Avenue home in May in time to make prepara- 
tions for the wedding. 

Mrs. George Crocker is making her presence felt gradu- 
ally. , She has a beautiful home in West Fifty-fourth street, 
where, she is at home on Tuesdays, when many carriages 
roll up to her distinguished door. She looks simply stun- 
ning, and I cannot pay her a higher compliment than per- 
mitting myself to drop into slang. Slang, by the way, is 
very much the fashion since the production of Mr. Town- 
send's "Chimmie Fadden," and even the daintiest lips now 
find nothing shocking in saying "Wot t' ell." It is a veri- 
table revel for the school-boy and girl. Mr. Townsend has 
much to answer for. 

New York, January 23, 1896. Passe-Partout. 

There was an informal meeting of the 
Gold Mining Exchange on Wednesday 
last, at which Walter F. Turnbull 
presided. After reports of progress 
from the different departments, the following committees 
were appointed: Executive Committee — P. T. Dickenson 
(Chairman), W. R. Smedberg, C. L. Hovey, Louis Glass, 
J. H. Roberts; Finance Committee— E. C. Godfrey (Chair- 
man), W. K. Flint, C. J. Shuster; Committee on Mines and 
Mining — John Daggett (Chairman), George R.Wells, J. R. 
Wilbur, H. D. Ranlett, and B. F. Lacy. The rooms of the 
Exchange are being fitted up elaborately, and it is ex- 
pected that, by the middle of next month, everything will 
be ready to start up business in good shape. 

STIRRED up by attorneys, old pensioners could not 
rest content, but put in pleas for increase. Thus im- 
pelled the pension figure shot up to $106,493,890 in 1890, 
$118,548,960 in 1891 and to $158,155,342 in 1893. The 
maximum seemed thus to have been reached, for the pen- 
sion outgo for the fiscal year ending with June, 1895, was 
but $140,772,164.— February Scribner's. 

«N import tax on silver and a tax on exported gold of 
twenty per cent, ad valerem might equalize matters 
and enable America to retain some of the precious metal 
that she produces. Such a law would be quite as feasible 
as some of the bills to which Congress has devoted so much 
deliberation. — Truth. 



The New Gold 
Mining Exchange. 



comes to stay 

There is more than one food which will cause the body 
to increase in weight. A free supply of sugar will do this ; 
so will the starchy foods; cream, and some other fats. But 
to become fleshy, and yet remain in poor health, is not what 
you want. Cod-liver oil increases the weight because it is a 
fat-producing food. But it does far more than this. It 
alters, or changes, the processes of nutrition, restoring the 
normal functions of the various organs and tissues. 

of Cod-liver Oil with hypophosphites, is pure cod liver in a 
digested condition. So that when a person gains in weight 
from taking Scott's Emulsion, it is because of two things : 
First, the oil has acted as a fat-producing food ; and, second, 
it has restored to the body a healthy condition. Such an 
improvement is permanent: it comes to stay. 

jo cts. ana U a bottle. SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists, New York. 



February 



FRANC 






THE LONG ARCTIC NIGHT 

Cr <lu 

riiul tht 

niL'lit. 

rored tl»- 



jnit 
ror 



• he lishing 

warmth and heavy room 
1 come in earnest. On the day when the 
bud si for the last time all hav'ds went i 

(0 bid it farewell. It remained In Bight tor half an 
hour only. For a few days longer there was a morning 
twilight. Then this faded and gave place to black night. 
The Mar* shone the whole twenty-four hours. The huts of 
tony were buried under the snow, of which thick 
whirlwinds tilled the air. The wind shook the huts to 

their foundations. Sometimes for days together the in- 
mates of the different lints could hold no communication 
with each other, though the huts were side by side. If 
anyone went out he was seized by the wind and had to be 
dragged back by means of ropes. In this darkness and 
desolation the aurora borealis did much to entertain and 
cheer them. It lasted sometimes for five days in succes- 
sion, with spiendors of color it seems impossible to des- 
cribe. To enjoy the spectacle I used to remain for hours 
in a hole in the snow, sheltered from the wind. I have 
never seen anything more terrible than a tempest during 
the Polar Dight. Man feels himself over whelmed iu im- 
mensity. When there came a lull in the storm and men 
ventured out. to breathe the air and purge their lungs of 
the exhalations of the smoking lamps fed with seal oil. 
Twilight appeared again in the middle of January, and on 
the 20th the sun rose above the horizon, while the members 
of the little colony stood in line facing it and fired a salute. 
No one had died or been seriously ill, but all had the look 
of corpses and were feeble as convalescents after a long 
sickness. Health returned with the appearance of the 
sun." 



WOMEN IN THE WORKSHOP. 

IN altogether too many of our commercial and industrial 
establishments, stores and factories, the men into whose 
hands is given the power to employ and control girls are 
not fit, from a moral standpoint, to herd swine. And yet 
thousands of our young women are allowed to go from their 
homes to work under the influence of these men and in the 
atmosphere vitiated by them, says Edward W. Bok in 
February Ladies' Home Journal. And why? Simply be- 
cause it is considered more " respectable " to be employed 
in an office, store or factory, than to be engaged in 
domestic service. The very word "servant" has a taint 
about it that the majority of young women dislike, and 
from which they flee. But what else are they in business 
establishments than servants, pure and simple? There 
can be no difference but an imaginary one. That is all. 
Far less leniency is shown in our business houses to women 
employees than is shown, as a rule, in our homes to 
domestic help — infinitely less. Mr. Bok further argues 
that if the mistress would seek to elevate domestic work, 
to treat servants with greater consideration, and to have 
the daughters of the family show some active interest and 
participation in household work, better, more intelligent 
and more reliable women would be attracted to the 
kitchens of our homes, and the destructive rush of young 
girls to work in stores, counting-houses and factories, 
would be largely checked, and a modern evil to a great ex- 
tent curtailed. 



The Grand Canyon Line ! — To the East. 
The "Santa Fe Route " Popular Overland Excursions to Chicago 
and Eastern cities will leave every Wednesday. Manager in charge. 
Through Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are run to Chicago 
every day. This is the only Line by which the Grand Canyon of the 
Colorado River can be reached. Send for illustrated book giving 
full particulars. C. H. Speers, A. G. P. A., 6i4 Market St., Chronicle 
Building, San Fran cisco, Cal. 

The Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reaas all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, ana supplies clippings on all topios, business 
ana personal. 



1 merchants find out 
that it ; iell Mai beth 

lamp-chimne) - because they 
make friends. 

lint look out for the one 
tli.u is made for your lamp. 
Let us send you the Index. 
A Mai i"-t!i I o 

Piit«l>urch Pa 



DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 
Now Basil Cor.tolid.itcd Gravel Mining Company. 

.1 Location 
nty, Cnl 
Nl ITU I , ucnl upon tlir tolli 

■ poet Ive Bean hold 
era, as rotlotrt s 

RAIDS \.» CCl . iu HO. SHARKS. A.M. 

L. Dornbergcr 19 no 187 BO 

C. Hi is nai 62 50 

Ami in accordance u Itb lavt ami an order of the Board or Directors, made 
on the 9th day of November, I8P&, so many shares of ouch parcel or suob 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, al theofnecot 
the company, No 525 Commercial street. Sun Francisco, California, on 

MONDAY. THK IIITll DAY OF FEBRUARY, 18116, 
at tiie hour of 12 oYloi-U M of said day. to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses or sale. 

F. X SIMON, Secretary. 
Oftlce: 525 Commercial street. San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Crown Point Gold and Sliver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill. Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 16th aay of January, 1806. an assessment, No. 66, of 25 cents per 
share, was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 35, third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Montgomery 
and Bush streets, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
20th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1896, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Thursday, the 12th day of March, 
1896, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS. Secretary. 

Office — Room 35, third floor. Mills Building, northeast corner Montgomery 
and Busb streets, S. F., Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Holmes Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Holmes Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 
309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on 

TUESDAY, the 11th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1896, 
at the hour of 12 o'clock m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Sat- 
urday, February 8. at 12 o'clock m. CHAS. E ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office — Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

DP? R I PO R l"Y <3 RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genn- 
urv. ruv-'V-Ttl-' o ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, 81 25; of 100 pills, 82; of 200 pills, 
83 50; of 400 pills, 86; Preparatory Pills. 82. Send for circular. 

J. A. W. Lundbora, Dentist, 



336 POST STREET, Rooms 3-3. 
Telephone 2275, San Francisco. 



(Opposite Union Square 



Dr. F. C. PAGUE, 

Dervtist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 



819 Market street 



[)R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 



40914 Post St., San Francisco. 



Dentist. 




THE LATEST AND THE BEST BRAND OUT 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 



(lit ©<?«• 







DEAR EDITH:— The square-necked bodice is the fashion 
now and it is very popular with young women who 
are not quite certain of the softness and delicacy in one's 
shoulders which the decollete round neck requires. 

As for colors everything runs to greens, nowadays. 
For boudoirs green decorations a la Pompadour are the 
style, with soft green velvet carpets; emerald and bronze 
— in fact they run the entire gamut of green— serve for 
picture frames and bric-a-brac. 

The Paris Figaro in remarking of the perfect figure of 
the beautiful Queen of Servia, and of her exquisite and 
stately carriage of her head, attributes it to the fact that 
Her Majesty has never used a pillow, and that she was 
trained from girlhood to sleep upon a narrow, hard 
mattress. This is a fad it would seem among European 
monarchies. Queen Amelia, wife of Louis Philippe, had 
the same notions. The late Prince Consort of England 
underwent similar discipline. In a fashionable female 
seminary not far from New Haven, Conn., attended by a 
number of our California girls, I am told that the old 
fashioned " back-board " of our ancestresses is in full 
sway. In other words, a young gentlewoman attending 
this female place of learning is not permitted to acquire a 
willowy stoop. 

A sensible matron, the wife of a very wealthy merchant, 
living in California street, not so very far from the Art 
Gallery has, to my mind, a far wiser solution of the pro- 
blem. Every morning, the pretty little daughters go 
through twenty minutes of Indian club swinging, and in 
the evening before dinner, they carry, perched ou the 
crown of the head a moderate weight — just for ten minutes 
only. They have exquisite, graceful figures, and yet their 
mamma says that she believes in letting her daughters 
have luxurious beds and soft pillows, and that a comfort- 
able sleep is as necessary, to beauty as exercise. 

Fans continue to be tiny. The very latest are of white 
gauze, shirred on each stick and showered with [gold 
spangles. The little Josephine fans of kid or gauze have 
dainty medallions painted ou them. 

In gloves, the recent fashion has tended toward pure 
white, or very light shades for all occasions — an expensive 
custom for the ordinary purses. Gloves in delicate even- 
ing shades are fastened with buttons of Roman pearl. 
Rose-colored pearls are used on flesh and pale pink opera 
gloves. The tops of the long wrinkled ball-gloves are 
slashed at intervals and threaded with inch-wide ribbon 
exactly the same shade tied in a knot on the outside of the 
arm. 

But for ordinary wear the brown English glove is con- 
sidered to be in perfect taste. It comes in the finest 
Suede with heavy black points. For driving or coaching 
at Burlingame or Del Monte, a pair of soft Suede gloves 
lined with squirrel, which I saw the other day, must be 
admirable. 

Velvet and fur is still the popular combination. 
Black Bear is especially in favor now and Blue Fox, 
Marten, and Thibet are all the vogue also. Theatre wraps 
of India shawls lined with white-angora are another 
fashionable vogary. Then there are many mixtures in 
furs, such as ermine with seal, or seal with chinchilla, 
chinchilla with sable, Thibet and Persian Lamb. 
Thibet capes on a yoke of Persian Lamb are, in 
fact, all the rage, and for evening wear, wraps are lined 
with white Thibet, ermine, or white or gray fox. 

Belinda. 



The public has reason to be thankful for the access it has to fresh 
sea water bathing in the center of the resident population of the city. 
The Lurline baths, on the corner of Bush and Larkin streets, erected 
and furnished by the Olympic Salt ^Yate^ Company, are the finest in 
the State. The accommodations are perfect for hot and cold salt water 
bathing in tubs or for those who prefer a swim. Baths open for 
early bathers at 6 o'clock a. m. Tickets— Plunge bath, in blocks of 
50, at the rate of 5 for ifl. Single tickets, plunge or tub, 30 cents, 
or 4 for %h 



flsk 
TO 

See 
Them. 



Guarantee a perfect fit and grace- 
ful appearance to any variety of 
figure, and are comfortable and 
durable. 

Made in short, long, extra long and 
extremely long waists; four, five, 
and six-hook clasps. 
We take pleasure in recommend- 
ing W. B., for the fit and wear of 
which we hold ourselves responsi- 
ble. We cheerfully and promptly furnish a new pair 
in all cases of dissatisfaction from any cause. 





MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

MME. MftRGHflND'S GREME DE, LA GREME. 



Endorsed by 

W. T. Wenzell.M.D., Ph.G. 

Ph M. 
Wm M. Searby, Ph.C. 
0- F. Jones, Ph.C. 
C. A. Clinton, M.D., ex- 
member Board of Health. 
G. W. Gerlach.Ph.G. M.D. 
W M. Logan, Ph.G. M.D. 
Dr. Lichau, 
Dr. Murphy, and others. 

MME. M A RG HAND Hair and Com Ptexion Specialist, 

Rooms 30 to 41. 121 Post St. Tuber's entrance. Telephone 1349. 
Send for booklet. 



A delightful preparation 
for pret-erving and beau- 
tifying the complexion. 

Awarded diploma at Me- 
chanics' Fair. 1895, for 
superior merit. 

Samples of Creme de la 
Creme given away. 




Well 

Dressed 

Woman 



Should have 

Fashionable Modes, Well Fitting, 
Perfect in Workmanship and 
Elegant Finish. 

I furnish these requisites. 

Mrs. fl. J. Bradley, M ° dis,e . 

313 Geary St , San Francisco. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners. dyers, Hour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stablemen, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F 



Tel. 5610. 



Removal Notice. 

TIREY L. FORD, Mtt'y-at-LaW, 

Has removed his offices to Rooms 156-157, 8th floor CROCKER BUILDING 



Georae B. Merrill 



833 Montgomery St., S. F. 



Has removed his 
Law offices to 

California Safe Deposit Building, 
Rooms 316 and 317, Third Floor, 



February i, 1896. 



SAN" FRANCISCO XF.WS LKTTER. 




w»Si 



PROF. Snore is a heavy built man of slow movement s, 
whose personal appearance »e of ;i bear, 

g also in charge of the astronomical department. 

>!•■• ting student Anjerry. the Professor said: "Thomas, 
do you take any interest in the movements of the heavenly 
bodied -. professor. I like to look at the Btars 

once in awhile." " Well, if you want to observe the move- 
ments of the Great Bear, come to my room to-night. I'll 
be in." — Texas Siftil _ 

"Maria." said Boggles to his wife, with an idea of in- 
structing her in political economy, "do you know what 
civil service is? "Jasper." said Mrs. Boggles, with 
memory of recent contact with the cook, "there isn't 
any." — Illustrated Monthly. 

" Brows seems to be very excitable. I saw him chase 
his hat to-day down a crowded street." "Well, what of 
that?" "If he'd only been cool and waited somebody would 
have caught it, brushed it and brought it back to him." — 
Chicago Record. 

Tue Hostess — Oh, yes! Her people were as poor as 
church mice; but since her marriage to wealthy John Got- 
more she has it easy. The Visitor — Easy ? I should say 
so! Why, she hasn't a single thing to do all day but sit 
and worry. — Puck. 

Magistrate — You must be subjected to a great many 
temptations, you are before me so often. Prisoner — Dat's 
de fac'. boss. Dis here am de world of temptations and 
trials. But de trials hit me de hardest, boss. — Hartford 
Times. 

"Colonel, what do you think of the theory that it is in- 
jurious to drink water while eating? " " I don't see, sah, 
why it should not be as injurious then as at any other time, 
sah." — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

The man who was looking at a house for rental asked 
the pretty servant girl if she was to be let with the house. 
"No, sir!" she replied. "If you please, I'm to be let 
alone." — N. Y. Vanity. 

" Dearest Emma, will you be mine? " "Oh, this is so 
unexpected — you must give me time." "How long?" 
"Just a moment. Mamma is waiting in the next room." 
— Fliegende Blatter. 

Timid Old Lady (watching the agitated water) — Are 
there ever any persons lost in this river, boatman? Ferry- 
man — Bless yer, no, ma'am; we alius finds 'em agin the 
next day. — Tit-Bits. 

Mr. Peoo Long — A basket of patent medicine ! What 
on earth you got 'em for? Mrs. Doser's Boy — Mar's go- 
ing to take 'em. She wants to git her pictur' in the papers. 
—Truth. 

"Queen Victoria and Emperor William are relations, 
are they not?" asked Bloomfield. "Yes; strained rela- 
tions," replied Bellefield. " — Pittsburg Chronicle-Telegraph. 

Briggs is hurrying home, having been notified of the ar- 
rival of twins. Newsboy — Extra " Sun," Mister? Briggs 
(bitterly) — Yes; just my luck. — Texas Sittings. 

Pater — This is an awful big bill for Turkish baths. Why 
do you go there so often. Daughter — Where else can a 
girl go who has nothing to wear? — Truth. 

"I was so tipsy that when I met you and Jones together 
I couldn't tell you apart; that is, at first." "How did you 
at last ?" "Jones offered me a cigar." — Truth. 

Forward Watch — Eight bells, and all's well. Seasick 
Passenger — He wouldn't say so if he knew how bad I feel. 
— Tid-Bits. 

Bennie — What's a conversationalist ? Jennie — Oh, it's 
a man that doesn't have to stop talking when he hasn't 
got anything more to say. — Truth. 

Sir Edwin Arnold is going to Japan again for curios. He is a 
great friend, by the way, of George T. Marsh & Co., who have such 
a splendid collection under the Palace Hotel. 



IS THE 

MOUNT 
FOR 00 




BARNES 
I ICYCLES 



HOOKER & GO. 

16-18 Drumm St, 

RETAIL STOftC: I 

1640 Market St 1 

Baa Francis, Cat. 



,/ WHITER 

' RIMMED \1 

hummer, 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 383-884 Pino street. 
Rooms for ladies and families, private entrance. John Bergez, Proprietor. 
Bay State Oyster House. 15 Stockton & 109 O'Farrell. N. M. Adler, Prop, 
Montgomery-St. Coffee and Lunch House. Good coffee and fresh eggs 
a specialty. Cream waffles. 426 Montgomery St. H. H HJUL, Prop. 
Malson Tortoni, French Rotisserie, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 
rooms and banquet hall. S. Coustantini, Proprietor. 

Nevada Restaurant, 417 Pine st. Private rooms; meals 50c Lodpy Bros 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Priwite 

"rops. 



dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. 



. B Blanco & B. Bruno, Props. 



DENTISTS. 
Dr. Thomas L. Hill, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows' Building, southwest corner Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours : 4 to 5. 
Dr. H. G. Young, 

Bridges and teeth without plates. 1841 Polk street. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

MEDICAL 
Dr. R. Elmer Bunker has removed to 630 Sutter street. 

Office Hours : 1 to 3 and 6 :30 to 7 :30 P. M. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St., near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval; any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 
Neuhaus & Co., 115 Kearny, up-stairs. Suits to order $12 50. Over- 
coats, $10. Pants $4 and upwards. Samples by mail. 
*S"A perfect fit guaranteed. 

VOCAL CTJLTURB. 
Miss Caroline Shlndler, Soprano. Vocal Culture. Hours, 1 to 3, 2416 Clay 
Joseph Greven, Vocal Teacher, Neumann Piano Store, 82 Ninth St. , S. F. 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES.— Don't leave the city without a box of ROBERTS' Best, 



ON WHEELS. 



G. &S. 



AXLE. GREASE. 



HOME PRODUCTION. 

G0BURN, TEV1S & CO., 107 Front St. 



Does your 



Root Need Repair? 

We will examine it without cost, and give 
estimate for putting in good order, and 
keeping it so for a term of years. 

Paraffine Paint Co. Kafte?;!™ 1 ' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 




'l 6 l^^S 



INDIRECTION .-exchange. 

FAIR are the fiowers and the children, but their subtle sugges. 
tion is fairer; 
Kare is the rose burst of dawn, but the secret that clasps it is 

rarer; 
Sweet the exultance of song, but the strain that precedes it is sweeter 
And never was poem yet writ but the meaning outniastered the 
meter. 

Never a daisy that grows, but a mystery guideth the growing; 
Never a river that Hows, but a majesty scepters the flowing; 
Never a Shakespeare that soared, but a stronger than he did enfold 

him, 
Nor ever a prophet foretells, but a mightier seer hath foretold him. 

Back of the canvas that throbs the painter is hinted and hidden ; 
Into the statue that breathes the soul of the sculptor is hidden ; 
Under the joy that is felt lie the infinite issues of feeling ; 
Crowning the glory revealed is the glory that crowns the revealing. 

Great are the symbols of being, but that which is symboled is greater ; 

Vast the create and beheld, but vaster the inward creator; 

Back of the sound broods the silence, back of the gifts stand the 

giving, 
Back of the hand that receives thrill the sensitive nerves of receiving. 

Space is as nothing to spirit, the deed is outdone by the doing ; 

The heart of the wooer is warm, but warmer the heart of the wooing; 

And up from the pits where these shiver, and up from the heights 

where those shine, 
Twin voices and shadow'd swim starward, and the essence of life is 

divine. 



IN .CONCHA PASS.— john it. hiluaro in ihoiaharous journal. 

Wind of the west, 
Wind of the western plains, 
Wind of the gray-girt hills, 
Wind of the winding trails- 
Blow pure, blow soft, blow sweet 
Across the land I love. 

Soft is the wind of the west, 
And cool, and drenched 
In odors lily-sweet. 
And soaked in wild perfume 

That drips 
From dew-drenched lips 

Of roses as they sway, 

To and fro, 
In the soft embrace 

Of the passionate 
Wind of the west. 

Wind of the west, 

Wind of the wailing harps, 

Of grass and grain, 
Wind of odors subtly blent 

Within the Occident. 

Wind of the wanton plains, 
Wind of the winged clouds, 
Wind of the grassy sea 
Blow pure, blow soft, blow sweet 

Across the Concha Pass, 
And kiss the wild blooms 

On her grave. 



A PARTING.— MICHAEL 0RA1T0N. 



Since there's no help, come, let us kiss and part,— 

Nay, I have done, you get no more of me; 
And I am glad, yea, glad with all my heart, 

That thus so cleanly I myself can free: 
Shake hands forever, cancel all our vows, 

And when we meet at any time again, 
Be it not seen in either of our brows 

That we one jot of former love retain. 
Now at the last gasp of love's latest breath, 

When, his pulse failing, Passion speech less lies, 
When Faith is kneeling by his bed of death, 

And Innocence is closing up his eyes— 
Now if thou would'st. when all have given him over, 

From death to life thou might'st him yet recover! 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 
309 and 311 Sansome St. .... San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and 46 Tbreadneeale St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 39 South Castle St.. Liverpool 

FUERST BROS. & CO 2 and 4 Stone St., New York 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Fireman's Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY. OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 

PHENIX INS. CO. OF BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Assets, $5,783,243 Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,661,401 

THE AMERICAN FIRE INS. CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $697,627 

PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INS, CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

Assets ,098,77* Surplus to Policy Holders, $1,889,252 

THE SVEA FIRE INS. CO. OF GOTHENBURG 

Assets, $5,493,831 Surplus to Policy Holders, 81,083,321 

Pacific Department, 407-409 Montgomery street, 

BROWN, CRAIG 6. CO., Managers. 



Assets, $2,296,083 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F. 
FlBB INSURANCE. 

Founded A. D. 1792 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA. 

Paid-up Capital $3,(100,000 

Net Surplus 2,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 

412 California St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11.000,000 

Assets 3, 192.001 . 69 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,506,409.41 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 401 Montgomery St. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF AIX LA 'CHAPELLE, GERMANY. ^Established 1825 

Capital, 12,250.000 Total Assets, $6,854,653 65 

UNITED STATE EPARTMMJT: 204 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Es "*>»*>»* ™- 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated 1799 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 
413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital 16,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. F 



nary i, 1896. 



I-RAXCISCO ni:\\s 






SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

Train. Urat« *o4 are I> 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



rmmcot 

- 



WISE AND OTHERWISE. 














■ 






: 


ISP 




« 


ISP 
















1 


ISP 




•7 


ISP 



.-aodro Haywards at;. t \Y..y 



moml. 
-..• "a Bartmru, 



M&rtlocx and Stockton 10 

10:00 A San Lcamlro. HnywimU, N 
t*:0Dii San Loandro, HuvwaMs and Waj 

Suttona 

- iu Joso and Livermore. . . 8 

- V 

tldOF i' i Way Stations. . tr 

.ndro. Hay wards and U'av 

Stations 

4^0 P San Lcandro, Haywards and Wuy 

Stations 6 

4:00 P Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo. 
Napa. Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9 

4:O0P Benicia. Esparto, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 

Oroville, and Sacramento 10 

4:30p Xiles. San Jose, Livermore and 

Stockton 7 

5:00 P Sao Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 8 

3:30p New Orleans Express, Fresno, 
Bakerstield. Santa Barbara, Los 
Angeles. Deming. El Paso, New 

Orleans, and East 10 

3:30 P Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 10 

6:00 P European mail, Opden and East . . : 
6:0U P Haywards, Niles and San Jose. .. 7 

I7:00p Vallejo f? 

7:00 P Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 10 

7:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations 10 

9:00 P San Leandro, Haywards and Way 

Stations t+12 

fl0:05p "Sunset Limited, - " Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans 

and East §12 

ttU:15p San Leandro, Haywards and 

Way Stations 7 



lap 
46A 

: 16 p 

:l.ir 
:t.iA 

16 P 

45 P 
:45 p 



45A 
15 P 
45 P 



:45A 
45 A 
:45 a 
:45p 



:45 a 
:50p 
;00a 

:45P 

;15a 



Santa Cruz Division {Narrow Gauge). 

8:15A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
F t( i .HoulderCreek, SantaCruz 

and way stations 5 :50 P 

*2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *11:20a 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, LosGatos 9:50 A 

til :45 p Hunters' Excursion. San Jose and 
Way Stations \1 :20 P 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:45 a San Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only 1 :45 P 

8:15 A San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe and prin- 
cipal way stations 7 :05 p 

10:40 A San Jose and way stations 5:00 p 

11:45 A Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

*2:30pSau Jose, GUroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10 :40 A 

♦3:30 p San Jose and principal way sta- 
tions 9:47 a 

*4 :30 P San Jose and Way Stations *8 :06 A 

5:30p San Jose and way stations *8:48a 

6 :30 p San Jose and way stations 6 :35 A 

tl 1 :45p San Jose and way stations f? :45 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 
(Slip 8). 

*7:15, 9:00, and 11:00 A. M., \\ :00, *2:00, 13:00, 
*4 :00, J5 :00 and *6 :0G P. M. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway. 

♦6:00,8:00, 10:00 A. M.; {12:00, *1:00, 12:00, 
*3:00, J4:00 *5:00p. m. 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

{Sundays only. ^Tuesdays and Saturdays. 

ft Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

gSundays and Thursdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



mm flgfal the r ;n*-n.i- 
mt. 
wblofa wt dart not thrfhk 

int. Aimti. 

Brills wrouclit by want of UlOUghl u 
i^ by want ■■( h*\iri. 11 i 

Poverty i* the teal <>f civility ami Ihe 
toaclistoofl of friendship. Hi slit t 

All a rhetorician's rales teach oothlng but 
to name his tools. -Samuel Bojtler, 

ive what vre want i> rich' 
able to do without Is power. ■ ;. Haodonald. 

A life of pleasure makes even the ^trniiK- 
est mind frivolous at last. - Buiwer. 

The one prudence in life is concentration ; 
the one evil is dissipation - Emerson. 

tt is hard for a haughty man ever to for- 
giveonewho has caught him in a fault,— 
Bruyere. 

The injuries we do anil those we sutler 
are seldom weighed in the same balance.— 
imona. 

No liberal man would impute a charge of 
unsteadiness to another for having changed 
opinion.— Cicero. 

Sarcasm is the language of the devil; for 
which reason I have long since as good as 
renounced it.— Carlyle. 

The sure way to miss success is to miss 
the opportunity.— Chasles. 

Our deeds determine us as much as we 
determine our deeds.— George Eliot. 

No man doth safely rule but he that hath 
learned gladly to obey. — Thomas A. 
Kempis. 

They who do speak ill of themselves, do 
so mostly as the surest way of proving how 
modest and candid they are.— Anon. 

Get together a hundred or two men, how- 
ever sensible they may be, and you are very 
likely to have a mob.— Johnson. 

The contagion of crime is like that of the 
plague. Criminals collected together corrupt 
each other. — Napoleon. 

To-morrow I will live, the fool does say ; 
to-day itself 's too late ; the wise lived yester- 
day. — Martial. 

The child taught to believeany occurrence 
a good or evil omen, or any day of the week 
lucky, hath a wide inroad made upon the 
soundness of his understanding.— Watts. 

Our own opinion of ourselves should be 
lower than that formed by others, for we 
have a better chance at our imperfections. 
—Thomas A. Kempis. 

We should be careful to deserve a good 
reputation by doing well; and when that 
care is once taken, not to be over anxious 
about the success. — Rochester. 

Our real blessings often appear to us n the 
shape of pains, losses and disappointments ; 
but let us have patience and we soon sh:ill 
se^ them in their proper figure.— Addisun. 



fl. BUSWELL, 

Bookbinder, Paper Ruler, Printi r 
and Blank Book Manufacturer. 
516 Commercial St., S. F. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

Fob Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 p M, for YuKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
steamers for SHANGHAI. 

Coptic (via Honolulu).. . Tuesday. Jan. 28,1806 

Gaelic Saturday. February 15, 180ft 

Doric Thursday, March 5, 1800 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
offloe, No. 425 Market street, corner First. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 
TmmoH FtllHT-Fnnt of M»i 

BAN KUAN. 

P vi Tluir-.t . 

D, ll in. I M. ! 

r h 
EtAFABL TO SAN FRANl 

Urdaja— Kxlra trips nt 1:55 

si MDAY8 B:I0, »:«, n 10 i M; 1:40,8 

'ii Sun PranelBOO and Sclmetzcn Park, 
bOdUle us above. 



D. D. STUBBS. Secretary. 



B. V. | In KHecl 
— ■ |Oot, 88, 1805. 



7:40a m 9:004 u 
5:10pm 5:0Opm 



Arrive ins. P. 



Sunday, jrjj 



Novato, io:40am 8:S0ah 
I'etaluma. 6 05PM 10:30AM 
Santa Rosa. I 7:30 pm 6:15pm 







Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Hcaldsburg, 

Geyservttle, 




7:40 AM 






HI :30am 








.1 ::«! p II 


8:00am 


7:30pm 


6:15pm 


7:40 AM 






8! ""li£lS!*u?SBiJ»«»- 


6:15pm 


gjjOpJJI 8:00AM | Guerneville j 7:30PM 


10 30am 
6:15 pm 


7:40AM! 8:00AM 1 Sonoma, 110:40am 
5:1Upm| 5:00pm 1 Glen Ellen. I 6:05pm 


8:50AM 
6:15pm 


7:40am| 8:00am 1 o„ h „„ f ._„, 110:40am 
3:30pm| 5:00pm | Sevastopol. | 6;05pM 


10;30AM 
6:15 pm 



Stages connect at San Rafael for Bolinas. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelsoyville, and Lakeport. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Saratoga Springs, 
Upper Lake, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Usal, 
Westport, Laytonville, Willitts, Capella, Porno, 
Potter Valley, John Day's, Lierley's, Gravelly 
Valley, Harris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday- to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 



TICKET OFFICE-350 Market St., 
Building. 



H.C. WHITING, 
Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen, Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch sleamors from San Francisco for 
portsinAlaska.il a.m.; Jan. 15,30. 

ForB. C. and Puget Sound ports, Jan. 5,10, 
15. 20, 25. 30, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pom- 
ona." al 2p M.Jan 2 6,10, 14, 18, 32,26, 30 and every 
fourth day thereafter 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a.m. Jau.4, 8. 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Jan. 2, 0, 10, 14 18, 22, 26, 30, 
and every fourth day thereafter, at U A. m. 

ForEnsenada, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, 
La Paz. AltaLa, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer 
"Willamette Valley." 10 a.m., 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Coolgardie gold-fields, 
(Freemantle) Australia, 
$220 first class, $110 steer- 
age. Lowestrates to Cape- 
town, S. Africa. 

O. S. S. Co.'s steamers 
sail: 

For HONOLULU, APIA, 
AUCKLAND, and SYD- 
NEY, S. S MARIPOSA, 
Feb. 6th, 1806, at 2 p. m. 
For HONOLULU, S. S* 
"AUSTRALIA." 
Saturday, Feb. 15, at 10 a m 
REDUCED SPECIAL, RATES for parties Feb. 
6lhand 15th, 1886. 
For passage apply to 114 Montgomery street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market street. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., General Agts. 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 




83F 

' Tfih 



=~^ 




DANCING has come well to the front this week, com- 
mencing with Miss Church's little dance on Monday 
evening; then followed the Burton's leap year domino 
party in the hop room of the Presidio, and George New- 
hall's dinner and cotillion, both on Wednesday evening; the 
Leap Year dance of the Alameda Cotillion Club, on Thurs- 
day evening, and the fancy dress cotillion of the Entre 
Nous Club, at Maple Hall, last night. The postponement 
of the final dance of the Friday Night Cotillion Club, which 
was to have taken place last night, until the 17th of 
April, while a disappointment to some, is not looked upon 
as an unmixed evil. The week has been a tolerably gay 
one, and the members think they will enjoy their assembly 
after the six weeks of enforced quiet of Lent, much more 
than they would now, and, besides, it will be a pleasure to 
look forward to all that time. 

Mr. Ed. Sheldon was the leader of the last Friday Fort- 
nightly Club's cotillion, kindly coming to their assistance 
when the illness of Mr. Grecnway prevented his keeping 
that engagement. The next meeting of the club will be 
their Leap Year dance, when Miss Alice Hobart will be 
the leader of the cotillion, on the evening of St. Valentine's 
Day, the 14th of February. 

The old residence, 501 Harrison street, which has, in its 
day, had many very pleasant gatherings within its walls, 
was again, after a lapse of years, the scene of a charming 
festivity, when Mr. and Mrs. V. T. Lawrence gave an "at 
home" last Friday evening. Music, dancing, and a delicious 
supper were the entertainment provided by them for a 
large number of guests. Mrs. James Otis's tea on Satur- 
day was another reminiscence of old times, for, although 
the residence is modern, and that portion of the city 
(Broadway) newer than the south end, there were many 
ladies present who belong to the older period of social life 
in San Francisco, and who are but seldom seen nowadays. 
The Beaver tea the same afternoon was a largely attended 
and pleasant affair, and so also was the third and final one 
of Miss O'Connell's recitals at Mrs. Jewett's, and the novel 
entertainment of Mesdames Tobin and Jarboe brought the 
week to a most charming conclusion. 

The large salon of the residence on Taylor street was 
arranged as a beer hall, with innumerable small tables, at 
which the guests were seated, and, while enjoying their 
refreshments of beer, cheese, and pretzels, could also enjoy 
the pretty tableaux which were given upon a stage across 
the lower end of the room. The " pretty waiter girls " 
were all becomingly attired in peasant costume, and in- 
cluded the Misses Helen Smith, Jennie Blair, Minnie Hough- 
ton, Sallie Maynard, Jennie Catherwood, and Lizzie Carroll. 
The Misses Flora Dean, Marian Wells, Helen Wagner, and 
Gertrude Carroll were the flower girls; while Miss Laura 
Bates provided the smokers with cigars and cigarettes. 
There were fourteen living pictures shown, all of which 
met with hearty and well-merited applause, after which 
there was dancing. 

The rival cotillions, as society folk called the Newhall 
and Burton dances, which came off on Wednesday evening, 
were each successful in the different lines. Both aimed at I 
novelty (the fad of the hour). Newhall's was on the pat- 
tern of the present New York style, a dinner-dance, and 
Mr. George Newhall received able support from several 
friends, who gave dinners at their respective homes before 
proceeding to the general n »,/, ivout. the Newhall residence I 
on Van Ness avenue, where the cotillion was danced, led 
by the host alone. The Monte Wilsons, Mayo Newhails. 
Joe Crocketts, and Mrs. NewhaU? mire, were the dinner 
givers, and the guests numbered nearly all the young mar- 
ried people of the swim, with a few of the older girls, the j 
beaux being of the "eligible " set. The cotillion was com- 
menced immediately upon the assembling of the guests at 
the Newhall residence, and was distinguished by the intro- 



duction of new figures and costly favors, both importations 
from Gotham for the affair, and at midnight a recherche 
supper was served in the large upper room which is a 
feature of the house. After supper the much feasted 
guests again gave themselves up to the pleasures of the 
dance, and it was long past midnight when adieus were 
said. Five figures were danced in the cotillion: Double 
Circles, Military Flags, the Snake, The Musical Chair, and 
The Surprise. The favors for each were statuettes, fiags, 
helmets, bows and arrows, jeweled hearts, musical instru- 
ments of all kinds, including tiny pianos, work boxes, sew- 
ing machines, and pug dogs in bronze. The genial host 
was the recipient of hearty congratulations upon the 
brilliancy of his entertainment, and the general comment 
was that Greenway had better look to his laurels. 

The Burton Leap Year cotillion partook largely of a 
military flavor, being held in the hop room of the Presidio, 
which was decorated with flags, crossed sabres, guns, etc., 
the music furnished by the regimental band, and the 
beaux nearly all the young officers, who are so popular 
with the girls. The young buds of the season were 
ensconced in domino and mask, and much hilarity was the 
result; many a wild guess being made as to who owned the 
bright eyes so provokingly peering from the mask. A 
great deal of taste was displayed in the arrangement of 
the flirtation corners, which were cozily furnished with 
lounges, soft cushions, etc. and the lights being all covered 
with red shades, gave a roseate hue to the scene, which 
was very becoming. A favorite spot, evidently, from the 
frequency of the visits paid there, was the brilliantly 
lighted tent where punch was dispensed. A delicious sup- 
per was served at 12 o'clock, after which the young people 
began the cotillion led by Lieutenant Coffiu and Miss Bur- 
ton. The figures were principally of a military character 
and the favors suggestive of the occasion, being dolls in 
dominos, army buttons, silver sabres, and bows and arrows, 
as surely many a shaft was sent forth and found a resting 
place at this most delightful affair. Little Miss Kathron 
Burton and Miss Pearl Sabine distributed the favors, and 
so happy were the guests it was nearing daylight when 
final good-nights were said. 

A brilliant and successful affair of the past week was 
the Fancy Dress german given by the Entre Nous Cotillion 
last evening at the Palace Hotel. Three new and pretty 
figures of the german were danced: Flags of all Nations 
and Lanterns, Grecian Cross, and Parisian Star and Circle. 
The costumes worn were both handsome and elaborate. 
The following are names of participants and costumes: 
Miss E. Cudworth, German Peasant; Miss Netta Creigh- 
ton, Spanish Dancing Girl; Miss Eleanor Croudace, Night; 
Miss Anna Papp, Queen Elizabeth; Miss Mae Ludlow, 
Queen of Butterflies; Miss Maud Haas, Moorish Princess; 
Miss Emma Prosek, Winter; Miss- Lotta Musto, Pierette; 
Miss Ala Keenan, Spanish Priucess; Miss A. Cousin, 
Morning Star; Miss Beatrice Hughes, Carmen; Miss Mae 
Folsom, Bo Peep; Miss Mabel McFadden, Marie Antoi- 
nette ; Miss Lauretta Cook, Night. Mrs. George D. 
D. Graham, Fishermaiden; and Mr. Marshall Borel Wood- 
worth, Lord Chancellor; Mr. Wallace Alexander, Louis 
XVI.; Robert Haight, Pasha; J. H. Wheeler, Mat- 
ador; O. M. Howard, King Rex, March Gras; J. O. Gau- 
tuer, Romeo; Fred G. Gautuer, Hamlet; Clarence Musto, 
Henry II.; Gaston Roussey, Matador; Edward J. Bigelow, 
Henry VIII.; Wm. G. Barr, Egyptian King; Sanfbrd G. 
Lewald, Don Caesar de Bazan. Led by Sanford G. Lewald, 
those in the first set were: Mr. Henry Whitley, and Mrs. 
Geo. D. Graham; Mr. A. H. Meussdorffer and Miss A. 
Sbarboro; Mr. Fred G. Gautuer and Miss Emma Prosek; 
Edward J. Bigelow and Miss E. Cudworth; Wm. F. Hooke 
and Miss Mae Folsom; Mr. J. O. Gautuer and Miss Jessie 
Lyon; Wm. G. Barr and Miss Mae Ludlow; Clarence 
Musto and Miss A. Cousins; Geo. F. Heuer and Miss Bea- 
trice Hughes; Sanford G. Lewald and Miss Gould. 

In spite of the exceedingly wet weather that day, 
Beethoven Hall held a large assemblage on Monday after- 
noon at the annual meeting of the Philomath Club, where 
essays were read and songs were sung for their entertain- 
ment. In the evening there were numerous theatre par- 
ties at the California and the Columbia, followed by sup- 
pers. To-day Mrs. Antoine Borel will give a tea at her 
residence on Stockton street. 






February i, 1896. 



SAN FRANCISCO XKWS LETTER. 



25 



liU has again thin 

' i|uart«T ibcrt- 

.in en- 
treet; 

I the 
ncc. Thf 
at the Christian Association Auditorium i>n 
xlay evening waster the benefit of tl 3 troari- 

..illy, musically, and 
' ids "f the now 
i>e given at Qolden Gate Hall on next Saturday 
afternoon. 

is not to receive a visit from the Oelrichs 

in the near future, as their Mends had hoped, as they sail 

rope about the middle of March, anticipating an al>- 

abroad of some duration. Mrs. I.oland Stanford is 

coming, though, and will soon be here. Mr. and Mrs. Dan 

Murphy. Colonel.) G. C Lee, and Mr. and Mrs. Al. Bou- 

vier have returned from tbeir Eastern visits, glad to be 

here again. Mr. and Mrs. .1 w Mackay are in New York. 

having come to the United States with the remains of their 

11. Mrs. W. J. Younger is in Paris. Dr. Younger 

is in Chicago, but is not exported to arrive here until late 

in February. 

A most entertaining concert was the farewell testimonial 
tendered to Mr. C. T. Wendell, the tenor of the California 
Quartette, at Odd Fellows' Hall, on Tuesday evening. In 
addition to solos, duos, and quartettes by the members of the 
California Quartette, the ladies of he Treble Clef Quartette, 
John and Mme. Marquardt contributed to a bright and 
interesting programme. Mr. Wendell has a clear ryric 
tenor of good quality, which, though not cultivated to any 
irreat extent, he uses with admirable effect. Mrs. Beatrice 
Priest-Fine's singing of Maseagni's " Ave Maria " was an 
exceptionally enjoyable number. 

Weddings are to be a leading feature in the social world 
next week — the Grant-Pond on Monday, the Goad-Hooker 
on Wednesday, and the Jarboe-Bull on Thursday. But 
there will be other festive affairs also, and first among 
them comes the dance at Lunt's Hall on Tuesday evening, 
when a Leap Year Cotillion will be given by a number of 
young ladies who, as the hostesses of the affair, will con- 
duct it in regular leap year fashion. 

A week from next Monday, February 10th, at noon, will 
occur the wedding of Miss Grove Crittenden and Mr. C. 
A. Windels, at Brighthurst, Ross Valley, the residence of 
Mrs. George E. Butler. The lady is descended from one 
of our oldest Kentucky families, and her grandfather was 
the celebrated lawyer, A. P. Crittenden. Mr. Windels 
has been connected with the house of Geo. C. Shreve & 
Co. for many years, and is universally popular. Right 
Rev. Bishop Nichols will conduct the ceremony. 

Mrs. and Miss Meyerdom and Mrs. John Corning of San 
Francisco registered at the office of the Cairo Sphinx 
recently. Mrs. Corning, after spending a few weeks at 
Shepheard's, left on January 31st for the Upper Nile in 
order to compare the Egyptian sunshine with that of the 
Golden Gate. 

The grand ball of the Cercle Francais, which takes place 
this Saturday evening, will be an event in the French col- 
ony. As usual, this year the Union Square Hall will be 
the scene of its annual elaborate festivities. The beautiful 
club rooms will be thrown open for the guests. 

Next week we are to have a visit from a scion of royalty 
in the person of Prince Luigi, who comes hither on the 
Italian frigate Colombo, and who will no doubt be feted by 
his countrymen during his stay in San Francisco. 

Recently announced engagements include those of Miss 
Georgie Wightman to Douglas B. Crane; Miss Edith Con- 
nor to Rudolph Ver Mehr. 

Mr. H. E. Huntington has gone East to assist at the 
Huntington-Holladay nuptials next week. 

Our losses include Miss Clara Huntington and Miss Joe 
Blackmore, who left for the East last week. 



Till 
musl 

read that he had got Into a real Bgbt and 
lost hi- equilibrium In an encounter with an ei 
theatre It goes to Bhow thai it is one thing to light for 
glory and fun according to the book of arithmteic, w 

ou on. and another to know how to prac 
the noble art of self-defense In case of a genuine 
attack. It also Bhows thai Corbet! is as far a 
siiilo from being a gentleman, or he would not have 
violated the rules of the theatre with his nasty 

cigarette smoking, and that be is only a contempt- 
ible bully. Hut why waste clean paper In an attempt 

ass a Sloggerf Be lias DOSed already too long 

a- a gentleman, and. longing to prove that no brute is 
more brutal than he can Be, he is waiting to defend himself 
against the victor of the approaching light in Mexico. If 

Heaven is good to him it will prick bis vanity, and, after 

liis next encounter, will inscribe Ins name among the in- 
glorious Have Beans. 

A GENTLEMAN of considerable color entered a barber 
shop the other day for the purpose of getting it in the 
locality contiguous to the neck. He was a Spaniard, next 
to the sun. The barber mistook him for 11 negro, and re- 
fused to tackle him upon the ground that he handled scis- 
sors and not sheep-shears. The Spaniard immediately 
grew wild, if not a little woolly — to speak figuratively. 
Now the unshaved has brought a damage suit for $25,000. 
If he will go to the barber for a shave now it is probable 
that he would learn something new about the dullness of 
that tool which often makes a rough man look smooth. 
This occurred in Southern California, where occurrences 
are quite frequent. _ 

THE sweetest and most inoffensive path of life leads 
through the avenues of science and learning; and who- 
ever can either remove any obstruction in this way, or 
open up any new prospect, ought, so far, to be esteemed a 
benefactor to mankind. — Hume. 



Cream of Orange Blossoms, creates spotless complexions. 60 cents, 
druggists or by muil. Pacific Perfumery Company, San Franoisco. 



THE Alameda girls who have sworn not to let young 
men kiss them before they, the young women, are 
married, would do well to extend the. oath a little and pro- 
hibit young men from kissing them after their marriage. 

MRS. Rudolph Herold Jr., met with a serious accident 
on Saturday last which will confine her to the house 
for several weeks. 



There is no place better known or more popular than the Original 
Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. It stands without a rival and has 
stood the test for years. The most delicious meals are served by 
gentlemanly attendants, and the management takes pride in having 
everything orderly. It is just the place for business men and ladies 
out shopping to lunch. 

The Langtiam Bar and Gate. 

CHENOWETH & WXLMOT will be pleased to see you and 
your friends at the grand opening of this elegant saloon, 



149 ELLIS ST., Corner Mason, 

SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 1806. 



Cafe Entrance: Masou street 



Cooper & Co., art stationers and heraldic engravers, 746 Market St. S.F 



Dave Samson, 

PROGRESS 
RESTAURANT. 



Fine Mercantile Lunoh. 
Imported Pilsener, Franctsoaner, 
and Extra Pale Lager on draught. 

327 and 329 Bush St. 



-r„„:^„„ r\ n ^ nn II r\ Tel., East-33. Residence iuk sutler. 

Tenison Deane, M. D. omcc, cn y or pan* Bunding N o.u 

Grant avenue. Ex-surgeon U. S. Army ; Ex-surgeon S. F. Receiving Hos- 
pital. Hours, 11 a.m. to 2:30 p. M.; 5 to 5:30 P. M. 

The modern oxygen cure Tor 
disease. 

Watson & Co. 

Pacific Coast Agents : 

124 MARKET ST. 
Send for circulars. 




26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 



HOW THE BRITISHERS BUY MINES. 

LONDON " Society " tells the following story, which 
illustrates how the British brother buys mines: 

According to Frank M'Laughlin, or Major M'Laughlin, 
as he is called at home, it is the easiest thing on earth to 
sell a mine in London for almost any price, providing you 
have anything to show an expert. The Major has been 
narrating to his friends in San Francisco the result of his 
trip to London, undertaken for the purpose of disposing of 
some mining property. "Of course, the first thing I had 
to do was to let capital know what I was there for. Then 
when enquiries commenced, I simply said, 'Gentlemen, I 
have mining property to sell. If you mean business and 
want to buy, send your expert out to examine the pro- 
perty and make a report on it; you will know then what 
you are buying.' A company was organized, an expert 
examined the property and reported favorably, and a 
meeting was held to discuss terms. 

" 'Now, Major,' said the spokesman, 'wehave found that 
the property may be worth something. What is your 
price?' 'Two hundred and fifty thousand' I said. 'That 
is more than we expected to pay. We expected to pay 
about two hundred. There is not much difference between 
two hundred and two hundred and fifty. If you drop the 
fifty, we will take it.' I had expected to get about one 
hundred thousand dollars for the property; so with a show 
of reluctance, I agreed to accept the offer. When the 
papers were made out. I was surprised to learn that they 
were talking about pounds, and I about dollars; but I was 
careful not to let my surprise leak, and that way I got one 
million dollars for the mine.'' Under these conditions, is 
it remarkable that Barnato et al. have well lined their 
capacious pockets? 

SN Odorless Region. — In that country once known as 
the " Great American Desert," embracing a portion 
of Texas and Arizona, there are no odors. There luscious 
grapes and many other fruits grow, especially near the 
cross-timber country, but there is no perfume; wild flowers 
have no smell, and carcasses of dead animals, which in dry 
seasons are very plentiful, emit no odor. It was always 
supposed to be a treeless plain, upon which no plant could 
grow or breathing thing could live, but a large part of it 
is now successfully cultivated, and but for the rarity of the 
atmosphere, causing the peculiarity named, ar.d the 
mirages, which are even more perfect' than in the Desert 
of Sahara, no one would look upon it as a barren country 
now. Another singular feature common to the desert land 
is that objects at a great distance appear greatly magni- 
fied. A few scraggy mesqulte bushes will look like a 
noble forest. Stakes driven into the ground will seem like 
telegraph poles. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

THE accusation of being intollerant which is charged by 
some American papers against the Germans because 
the latter refuse to give a place to the Heine memorial, 
causes amusement among the Teutons. The Volk, Berlin, 
says that nobody denies Heine's poetic talent; nor is there 
any animosity against him because he was a Jew ; but he 
threw mud at his country and his people, and the French 
archives prove that he was secretly paid to do so. One 
may just as well otter the Greeks a statue in honor of 
Ephiultes, as the Germans a memorial of Heine. 

IN Palestine one could pen a brick epistle, which in the 
space of a few inches contained as much information as 
can now be condensed into a sheet of notepaper. Such 
letters were neither heavy nor bulky, and could be carried 
in the turban or in the folds of the shirt bosom, just as 
easy as paper letters are now so carried, with the addi- 
tional advantage that they were imperishable, as is wit- 
nessed by the fact that they are now being read three 
thousand five hundred years after they were written. 

Saint Augustine! well hast thou said, 

That of our vices we can frame 
A ladder, if we will but Head 

Beneath our feet each died of shame. 



BANKING. 



chS wli* ESq8£ ™ " ' ^ Wng SyruI> " ,or >'™ r 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 
Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits, 81,181,910 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan 
iamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Ta 
coma, Washington. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Livekpooi-— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
SouTn America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China ana 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October I, 1804).. 3.158,129 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vice-Fres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust aDd Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Stkf.ets. 

Deposits. Di'c. 31, 1895 $24,202,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,63] 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be seut by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Oftlce hours— 9. A. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid-up $2,450,000 

Reserve $375,000 

San Francisco Oftlce— 124 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St. 
Portland Branch— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER I Ass't Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— Third National Uauk. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Oor. Sansome and Suiter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital J2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital t2,UOU,0u0 

Reserve Fund $800,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street. London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal ci ties of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENBAUM 1 „„„„„„„„ 
_ O. ALTSCHUL } Managers,. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK 0PSAN fkancisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid- Up Capital tl,000,000. 

WM.H. CROCKER President 

VV. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F.Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 | Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout thu 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART \ M . natrpr , 

P. N. LILIENTHAL J Wana £ ers - 



February l, 1896. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



PLATONIC FRIENDSHIP. 

I|m > not know of a suhjtvt more difficult to treat tlian 
this, ami I 001 on in approaching it 

at 11! - ■■ an in Tlir Woman at Home 

Plutonic Friendship a Friendship pup 

simple, into which do question .>: .rx enters, or anj 
bilitv of marria_- 

by some, and even held to be one of the most satisfying of 
human relationships. This I oouid very well believe, only 
I have never met with a perfect instance of such friend- 
ship, though 1 have seen very many attempts at it. The 
nearest approach to it I have observed between men and 
women who have known each other all their day.-, whose 

families have been on terms of close intimaev for years. 
and who feel almost like brother- and sisters, though bound 
by no tie of blood. There is no doubt that the relations 
between the sexes have of late years undergone a con- 
siderable change, and this is largely owing to the greater 
freedom accorded to women, who now work side by side 
with their brothers in almost every field of labor. And 
out of this greater freedom of action and life has arisen a 
comradeship which is helpful and stimulating in many ways. 
But this is a kind of general principle, and when we come 
to closer quarters, that is. to an intimate friendship be- 
tween a man or woman, married or unmarried, complica- 
tions are very apt to arise. 

Friendship implies a good deal. It is not a mere ac- 
quaintanceship, characterized by a casual interest in the 
affairs of another, but an intimate relationship, which con- 
cerns itself affectionately and constantly with the joys, 
anxieties, and sorrows of another. It also implies a good 
deal of personal intercourse at some period, though separa- 
tion may necessitate that intercourse being continued 
through the medium of letters. It is exacting and apt to 
be jealous and exclusive in the ordinary human breast. I 
am speaking, of course, of the average type of man and 
woman, very faulty and very human, yet lovable withal. 
The few paragons who inhabit this earth must necessarily 
be judged from a different standpoint. Then we have na- 
ture to reckon with, and in all my experience and obser- 
vation of men and things I have never seen a case of so- 
called Platonic friendship which did not come to some is- 
sue fatal to its continuance. I am not afraid to say boldly, 
though I very well know that. I shall be arraigned for it by 
a host of opponents, that I think it well-nigh, if not utterly, 
impossible for an average man and woman, unmarried and 
otherwise unattached, to continue the intimacy involved 
in the word friendship for any length of time without a 
change coming over the spirit of their dream. Unfortu- 
nately it is too often the case that in only one awakens the 
desire for that nearer relationship which in the perfect 
marriage, still possible to the few, gives to friendship its 
crown. Once awakened, this desire obviously makes the 
friendship impossible of continuance; its very intimacy is a 
source of torture, its sympathy and union of taste a mock- 
ery. I am of course writing of Platonic friendship as seri- 
ously as I would of any other friendship. It has many 
counterfeits, and some fondly imagine that they are set 
apart from their fellows by a unique relationship which has 
nothing at all to distinguish it from ordinary acquaintance- 
ship. I am far from saying that friendship between men 
and women does not and cannot exist. This would be ab- 
surd and untrue. In every walk of life such friendships 
are to be found; helpful, stimulating, and soul-comforting 
they are. But I do not hesitate to say that Platonic 
friendship, involving that close, dear, and constant inter- 
course which makes all true friendship so sweet and satis- 
fying, is a relationship fraught with danger to the peace 
of mind of the men and women who essay it. 

LOST wealth may be restored by industry, the wreck of 
health regained by temperance, forgotten knowledge 
restored by study, alienated friendship smoothed into for- 
getf ulness — even forfeited reputation won by penitence and 
virtue. But who ever looked upon his vanished hours, 
recalled his slighted years, stamped them with wisdom, or 
effaced from heaven's record the fearful blot of wasted 
time. — Mrs. Sigo urney. 

Both comfort and health may be secured by the wise selection of 
underwear, and the splendid stock carried by John W. Carmany, 
25 Kearny street, affords every opportunity for a wise choice. I 



BANKING. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

n Post Stmkkt. bki>>w kkah.it. Mi iron hi-h.iuko. 

Guaranteed Capital, iiiiri.aii Paid. Up Capital, kumid. 
urn 

JAMES l> I'HK.I. AN r .. irOBPBl 1. nt 

JOHN A HOOPER, Vloe Praaldont 

Dihk-tiihs— Jamrv 1, I' Dmlsr, John A. Hooper 

Honker. James Mnflll, S cl Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McKlroy, 
and Joseph D, Grant. 

Interest paid on Term a nit Ordinary Deposits Loans on approved so- 

A. STORY. Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Well. Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts aend signature. 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. COIlNKIl SANSOME & StJTTRIl STREETS. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,350,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier! B\ L. Llpmnn Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City.H. B. Parsons. Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, BenJ. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Hunttngton. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1 ,250,000 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

James K. Wilson President. C. F. A. Talbot, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill, Cashier. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, Charles Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, 
Wm. P. Johnson, C. F. A. Talbot. James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, $1,000,000. Reserve Fund $ 715,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1895, $30,727,586 59. Guaranteed Capital. .$1,200,000 

OFFICERS— President, B. A. Becker; Vice-President, Edward Kruse; 
Second Vice-President, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

Board op Directors— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Shoemann, 
A. C. Heineken, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart, 
Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

332 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

Wm. Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Lincoln. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No, 18 Geary Street. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 

ERNST BRAND Secretary 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Paoiflc Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest Improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sannome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

O A T E N I S . AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PATENTS. 

BOONE. & MURDOGK. (E. F. Murdock. Jno. L. Boone). 
San Francisco Office: Nucleus Building, Cor. Market and Third Sts. 
Washington Office: Opposite Patent Office. 




REMOVED TO 624 MARKET STREET, PHELAN BUILDING 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i, 1896. 



THE INDIGNANT SPEOTRE. 



By Stuart W. Booth. 



NOT a word could it utter — riot a particle of its intense 
indignation could it manifest. It was merely a spectre, 
if such is the proper name for that which hovers around 
after that which is material has turned to dust. 

The fact that the spectre while in the flesh had been ab- 
normally inspired with its own importance did not have a 
tendency to make it, now that it was no longer a thing-, 
patient or philosophical. It was simply an indignant spec- 
tre, and lil<e most of its kind was unable to proclaim its 
presence. 

Six men sat in the private room of a lawyer's office. 
They were discussing the will of a dead millionaire. Each 
lace expressed jubilation, and there was in each eye a look 
of mutual distrust, coupled with a suggestion of individual 
self-confidence. As one of them read the document it 
seemed to please them mightily. 

The customary "In the name of God, Amen," only 
caused a slight, derisive laugh, but as the various clauses 
were read the interest increased. To the ordinary mortal 
the will would have appeared an ordinary one, but to that 
little coterie it appeared extraordinary. In fact, they 
thought it was a very clever piece of work. So it 
was. from a criminal point of view, and each had contribu- 
ted in some degree to what they were pleased to call their 
success. 

Of that six, four were heirs and two were lawyers and 
by substituting certain clauses for others, and by obtaining 
the signature of the millionaire to a duplicate copy, they 
had secured his thousands for themselves and to the legal 
exclusion of many others, whose rights, except for the 
will, would have been indisputable. When the reading- 
was concluded they congratulated each other and sent the 
office boy for a couple of bottles of champagne. 

"So the old fool got badly left," said the nephew. 

" Qm!" came from five pairs of closed lips. 

And the spectre saw and heard it all. But though it 
could not speak, it was conscious of a desire to say some- 
thing, and that something was this: 

"This is the end for which I worked, for which I saved. 
These are the nephews, the 'dear good boys,' who were so 

solicitous of their uncle's welfare. I would to God " 

But the spectral arm was powerless toexpressits wrath. 

• ■ Was it for this I turned a deaf ear to the voice of char- 
ity — aye, and the voice of conscience? Was it for this " 

but the train of thought broke up at this point, and fol- 
lowed a dozen different trails. Wrecked homes, foreclosed 
mortgages, graves, orphans, passed in review and the 
spectre writhed. How he longed to kick over the cham- 
pagne — bought with money that was once his— but a foot 
of air is harmless to injure anything so real as champagne. 

" Not a tear have I seen since my departure — nothing 
but gloating over the fact that I was duped. If I could 
only — " but it couldn't. 

" Here's to the old man's ashes." he heard, followed by 
the tinkling of glasses. 

" May they rest in peace" — some more tinkling. 

■- While we spend his coin" — yet more tinkling. 

All this the spectre heard. It had the same effect on it 
as had the old method of torturing by inserting a red-hot 
iron into the bowels through a horn tube, to avoid all evi- 
dence of the crime. 

It tried to make itself heard, but the immaterial lips, 
though they tried hard to move, were dumb. For half an 
hour the indignant spectre attempted to impress upon the 
company the fact of its presence. Finally, crazed with 
anger and mortification of mind, or that which is akin to it 
in spectredom, and furious at the fact that, though -con- 
scious, it was simply nothing, the spectre wafted itself to 
another scene. If it didn't waft itself there, it got there 
somehow. 



In a little room in one corner of a flat sat a middle-aged 
woman. She was industriously sewing, the while humming 
to herself some well-known ballad. Over the mantel was 
a picture of a comparatively young man that had been in 



her possession nearly twenty years. She had not seen 
that face in life for a long time, but her whole existence 
had once been centered in its owner. After he had ceased 
to care for her and had thrown her, as a toy, aside, she 
withdrew from the world and nursed her grief and shame 
in obscurity. Treasured in her memory was another pic- 
ture, that of a babe whose little face, though it saw not a 
whole year of life, bore a strong resemblance to the face 
over the mantel. 

While engaged with her work the spectre realized that 
it was in the room watching her. Could it have been seen, 
it would have been noticed that the face of the spectre was 
that of the picture on the wall. 

Suddenly the singing ceased. The work dropped from 
the seamstress's hands. She looked over the mantel and 
her eyes dimmed with tears. Not for many years had 
memory been so active or so cruel. 

A scrap of newspaper lay on the floor. She picked it 
up and proceeded to wrap it around some dress goods. As 
she did so. her eye caught a familiar name among the death 
notices. She turned ashy pale. It was his name. 

Going to the mantel she took down the picture, pressed 
it to her lips, and sitting down at the table, allowed her 
head to fall on her hands, while she bathed the portrait 
with her tears. 

And of all this the spectre was conscious. Pity, sympa- 
thy and love were revived. The space of a score of years 
was bridged over. It longed to once more clasp the woman 
who had never ceased to love him, but — he was a spectre, 
and spectres cannot repair wrongs. 

As it noted the anguish of that true heart, the spectre 
suffered the torments of hell; nay, more, it was in a hell 
the torments of which even the imagination of Dante or 
Milton failed to depict. 

For the first time it realized the truth. How much more 
precious appeared that lonely woman, the emblem of fidel- 
ity, than all the lucre for love of which she had been dis- 
carded, fearing lest his so-called friends would chide him 
with a plebeian alliance. 

Racked with remorse and grief, it longed to kneel before 
her and plead for that most comforting of all human 
solaces — forgiveness. But spectres have no power to 
kneel or plead, and this knowledge added to its torment. 
It could only realize and suffer but could uot relieve itself 
or be relieved. But it was conscious of an agony that was 
gradually increasing. Oh, how it longed to groan! 

The sobs of the poor woman came slower and slower. 
She raised her head. Her face wore a look of determina- 
tion. She went to a cupboard and took out a small vial. 

The spectre realized that she placed it by the side of the 
sewing-machine nearest the lounge. Then she stood facing 
that picture over the mantel and gazed at it for what 
seemed to the spectre an hour, but which was less than a 
minute. Opening a bureau drawer she lifted a little baby's 
cape. A tear fell on it, and after folding it neatly, she re- 
placed it and knelt by the lounge. 

The spectre was conscious of what she was about to do. 
A burning desire to snatch that vial from where she 
placed it, ere she rose, consumed the millionaire's shadow. 
Could it have done so remorse would not have been so 
bitter, but — spectres can't snatch. 

Slowly, and with a peaceful expression on her flushed 
face, she arose from her knees. Taking the vial from off 
of the sewing-machine she glanced once more at the 
picture on the wall and lay down. She took a deep 
draught of the contents of the vial. A little later bottle 
and stopper fell from her hand. Her breathing became 
heavier and slower. After a few minutes a deep groan 
issued from her lips and the millionaire's victim was be- 
yond the reach of faithlessness and torment. 

At the same time the spectre's hell became tenfold 
more intense than it had ever been before. 






The breadth and generosity of the people of California account 
largely for their readiness always to help those in distress. It is a 
significant fact that the generous, warm-blooded gentlemen who are 
accustomed to the use of the J. F. Cutter.Whiskey are those who gen- 
erally are foremost in kindly deeds and acts of public enterprise. 
Hence it may be observed that the better class of men-about-town 
are sure to call fcr J. F. Cutter whiskey, and that they are never con- 
tent with the assurance that something else which is offered them is 
"equally as good " or "costing much more." They know the J. F. 
Cutter by long experience, and will be satisfied with nothing else. 



Latter. 



F«bru*ry 8, 1896. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 8, 1896. 



monopoly privileges" of the company, is past finding out. 
The ei ■' is on the same, basis respecting rights of 

way as is any other of its kind in the State, and has no 
roads which it docs not use. 

The real obstacle to the construction of more railroads 
in Northern and Central California is not any existing 
monopoly of privileges, but the rabid anti-railroad senti- 
which the gr